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December 03, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-03

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)age Six

THE !MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, December 3, 1969

Healy discusses

Wolverine campaign

By TERRI FOUCHEY
Brian Healy, since he led his
high school team to the state
championship of Ohio and was
named All-State and high school
All-America, has had, obviously,
a lot of big moments in his life.
But a little sign placed in the
Michigan lockerroom last January
began the path to his biggest
moment.
The sign, put up by Coach
Schembechler at the start of win-
ter conditioning stated simply,
"Those who stay will be cham-
pions." Last Saturday, Healy and
the others who stayed became
champions. And the sign had
helped. It offered incentive and
helped foster in the team a tre-
mendous cohesiveness.
As Healy describes this situ-
ation, "We had just as good mate-
rial my sophomore year but we
weren't as tight a unit. From the
beginning of winter conditioning
this year there was no class dis-
tinction on the team. We usually
call the sophomores 'rookies' and
this year it's more in a joking
manner than before."

Healy is not only part of aI
championship team but also a
member of what many consider to
be the best defensive secondary in
the country. He gives several rea-
sons for the secondary's success.
"Small, fast men make the best
pass defenders and the three of
us certainly fit the small part of
this formula. We have at times
been bad tacklers but that's not
our main job, pass coverage is.'
ANOTHER REASON is the fact
that "we're very well coached by
Coach Hunter." He adds, "We're
well-prepared, too. We don't just'
go through pass coverage but we
study individual tendencies and
cuts. This makes it a lot easier to
cover because if a receiver makes
a certain cut I know he's going in-
to a certain pattern and can ad-
just to it."
As far as thtir tackling is con-
cerned, Healy feels that it im-
proved as they learned it. "Tack-
ling is just a matter of knowing
how. You have to explode into the
guy, not just stand there and ex-
pect him to fall over your body."

Healy's method of explosion in-
spired teammate Paul Staroba to
nickname him "Hornet" because
he's little and he stings. During
many practices Staroba had been
on the receiving end of his stings.
His size makes Healy one of the
smallest players in the Big Ten.
It has not, however, made him
afraid of any particular receiver
or of injury. "Nobody goes onto
the field with the intention of
hurting anyone. I know I've hurt
a few guys but I didn't feel bad
and I know the guy who hurt me
last year didn't feel bad either.
You just go out there to do your
job and sometimes that means
someone gets hurt."
HE'D LIKE to give the pros a
try in spite of his size but he's very
interested in going to medical
school. "I picture myself making a
living as a doctor, not playing pro
football."
The medical school was a factor
in his choice of Michigan and he
likes the overall orientation of the
campus. "Learning here is 75 per
cent from books and 25 per cent
from influences outside of classes
-the contact with all kinds of
people and ideas."
This formula has worked for
Healy. He received the Dr. Arthur
D. Robinson award as the out-
standing senior scholar on the
team. He has maintained a B
average throughout college.
HIS ONLY major complaint
about the campus is the prevalent
attitude toward athletes. "Athletes
are looked down upon, the "dumb
jock" idea. People don't seem to
want to realize that you're an in-
dividual, a human being with
something more to you than just
being an athlete."
He is proud of the fact that the
defense forced 42 opposition turn-
overs with interceptions account-

ing for 24 of these. The intercep- of 28 in one year, But we forced
tions were, he thinks, part of the them to throw and we were sur-
consequences teams paid for "hav- prised that we managed to grab
ing to throw." "The secondary six of them."
wasn't beat on a deep pass this
year. No one managed to get be- AS FOR Southern California
hind us. At times we may have and the one remaining game he
given a team the short ones but views them as "very much a
never the long one." The longest worthy opponent as we are for
touchdown pass against them was them." He hasn't seen enough of
for 22 yards. them to judge but feels that talent-
"Going into the Ohio State game wise they are a lot like Ohio State.
the defense had 18 interceptions "They're not quite as fundamen-
and we figured this would be our tal, though. They also have a good
season's total. We were somewhat quarterback and good receivers."
disappointed because we were Like the rest of the Champions
hoping to break the NCAA record I of the West he's glad he stayed.
Wisconsin fires Coata
Sanders challenges NBA/
By The Associated Press
0 MADISON - Wisconsin Coach John Coatta, who suffered
through three losing campaigns at the Badger football helm, was
fired last night.
Athletic Director Elroy "Crazylegs" Hirsch said a search for a
new head coach would begin immediately.
* * *
! CHICAGO - Alphra Saunders, former Bradley University bas-
ketball star, filed a $2.5 million suit against the National Basketball
Association Tuesday, challenging the NBA player draft as uncon-
stitutional.
The suit was filed in U.S. District Court by attorneys Phillip
Festoso and Phillip Witt. It charges that the NBA "unlawfully con-
spired" to bar Saunders from competition that the draft system
"deprived him of his right to earn a livelihood in his chosen pro-
fession."
Saunders, now a math teacher at Chicago's Harper High School
and a player on local teams, allegedly was involved in the 1961 college
basketball scandal. Reportedly, he and a Bradley teammate, Tim
Robinson, rejected bribe offers but failed to report them to authori-
ties. They were expelled from school.
* * *
* LOS ANGELES - Sid Smith, All Coast offensive tackle for
the University of Southern California, underwent a knee operation
Monday and will miss the Rose Bowl game against Michigan Jan. 1,
USC officials said Tuesday.
Smith, a senior from Long Beach, injured the knee in practice
before the University of Washington game.
ABERDEEN, Scotland - Anti-Apartheid demonstrators in-
vaded the field at Aberdeen's Linksfield Stadium Tuesday and stopped
the rugby union game between the South Africans and North Scotland.
Play was held up for seven minutes while police struggled to clear
the playing area.

HE FEELS THIS attitude had
a lot to do with the team becom- D|oStand
ing champions. "This team has the P ro Sdings
kind of closeness you find on high
school teams. College teams usual- Eastern D ision
ly don't have it because they w L T Pt. GF GA
haven't played together or known New York 14 4 5 33 77 53
each other as long. But we study Montreal 11 3 830 80 50
Yf 4 $ Boston 11 5 6 28 78 62
together, hang around together Detroit 10 7 4 24 58 54
and party together and that's con- Chicago 10 7 3 23 56 41
tributed to closeness." Toronto 8 10 3 19 57 65
He continues, "Everybody con. -Western Division
-Daily-Jim Diehl nected with the team is a part of St. Louis 10 8 4 24 70 53
Minnesota 7 9 4 18 56 58
Tont Curtis this closeness. We all realized that Pittsburgh 6 10 5 17 53 62
we weren't individuals in this en- Philadelphia 3 8 9 15 44 62
- -- - -- terprise but a part of a team. We Oakland 6 13 2 14 42 77
Los Angeles 3 15 1 7 39 73
Read and Use knew we had to make certain Last Night's Results
sacrifices and everyone was willing Los Angeles at Oakland, Inc.
Daily Classifieds to." Today's Games

Briant Healy (24) blocks for I

It's the "joy Is Like The Rain" gals ...
Sister Miriam Therese Winter
and the.. .
MEDICAL MISSION
SISTERS

I
I

-

Toronto at Minnesota
Chicago at New York
Detroit at Pittsburgh
Philadelphia at Los Angeles
Oakland at St. Louis

Wed., Dec.
4:00 P.M.

3

Society of Classical Liberalism
presents
Dr. Anthony T. Bouscaren
"REASONS FOR U.S. INVOLVEMENT
IN VIETNAM"
THURSDAY, DEC. 4-8:00 P.M.
3B Union

CANTERBURY
THURSDAY, DEC. 4

HOUSE
7,9, 11 P.M.

I -

Benefit for the Alternative $1

Lutheran Student Center
801 S. Forest (cor. H ill)

WARRENDALE
An Evergreen Film presented by GROVE PRESS/produced and
directed by ALLAN KING

I'

"Probably one of the most telling,
even shattering documentary films
ever made is WARRENDALE, win-
ner of several festival prizes dur-
ing the last year or so, but only
now being released here by Grove
Press."-Hollis Alpert
INTERNATIONAL FILM CRITICS'
PRIZE (with "BLOW-UP") 1967
Cannes Film Festival
"WARRENDALE is so moving, so
fascinating and fine, that I hesi-
tate to say what it's about. The
moment I mention the subject, the

reader will perhaps think that the
film is noble and worthwhile but
that he is willing to take its worth
for granted and spare himself. This
would be self-cheating: not of in-
formation of duty but of human-
ity and, in a paradoxical way, of
joy. WARRENDALE is a documen-
tary about emotionally disturbed
children. It is not a study, it is
not propaganda. It is an experi-
ence, passionate and compassion-
ate." - Stanley Kaufmann, Satur-
day Review

Environmental Action For Survival
PRESENTS
DONALD MICHAEL
Author and Program Director of CENTER FOR RESEARCH
ON UTILIZATION OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE
'ENVIRONMENTAL KNOWLEDGE, POLITICS,
PASSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES'
DECEMBER 3-7:30 P.M.
AUDITORIUM B, ANGELL HALL

Free Will Offering

All Welcome!

I

S.G.C. AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

OF

IC IAL

ROSE

BO

L

ST

E

FACUL

TOUR

As the official agent for the Michigan.Rose Bowl tour, Conlin-Dodds Travel Limited
has spared no effort to provide a well-planned, exciting experience for University of
Michigan students. The tour has been planned to offer organized activity when appro-
priate, but, also, to place maximum emphasis on free time for exploration of Pasadena

and the surrounding area. Several supplementary optional tours can be added to the
package program, such as: a New Year's Eve party, a trip to Disneyland and a tour of
Universal Studios . . . all at specially reduced rates. Further, the package program
includes free shuttle bus service to many exciting points in Los Angeles and Hollywood.

1.1
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

TOUR INCLUDES
Round-trip by Air Jet-Detroit or Chicago
Hotel for 5 nights (Deluxe International Hotel)
Bus to Rose Bowl Parade, to game and return
Reserved grandstand seat at the Rose Parade
Deluxe box lunch, including beverage, day of the game
Transfers-airport to hotel and return, including
luggage--includes tip
Flight and medical insurance
Rose Bowl Game ticket
Free bus shuttle -service to various L.A. areas

THE OFHIAL TOUR INCLUDES THE GAME TIKET
-do not go to the Athletic Ticket Office when the general sales
begin as ALL TOUR MEMBERS WILL RECEIVE THEIR GAME
TICKETS DURING THE FLIGHT TO LOS ANGELES.
AMPLE SPACE IS AVAILABLE-You may sign up through De-
cember 5 and be assured of a place on the tour.

OPTIONAL TOURS

(1) Disneyland and Knotts Berry
$8.25 per person includes: round
admission, 10 rides

Farm (full day). Cost:
trip bus transportation,

(2) Universal Studio Tour. Cost: $6.00 per person, includes:
round trip bus transportation, admission, tour

National Rent-A-Cars available at the International
offering a 20% discount for all Tour members.

Hotel

COST WI
STUDENTS: M(
1. COMPLETE PACKAGE:
(Supplemental Jet Airlines will be used)
$230 from DETROIT
$216.00 from CH ICAGO
2. AIR ONLY PACKAGE:
(Many airline seats will be on scheduled airlines) SCHEDULE FOR S
$150.00 from DETROIT TUESDAY,
$136.00 from CHICAGO
WEDNESD
FACULTY, STAFF & MARRIED STUDENTS MONDAY
COST IS $240.00 PER PERSON including all items in the (Sales clos
student package from Detroit. However, accommodations
;;:- - k * A * A ^ i

HERE TO SIGN UP
CHIGAN UNION, THIRD FLOOR, RM. 3K
(YOU MUST BRING YOUR ID CARD)
PHONE 665-3671 or 665-3672
SALE OF TOURS*
November 25-10 A.M.-8 P.M.
)AY, November 26-9 A.M-12 Noon
, December 1 through Friday, December 5-10 A.M.-8 P.M.
se 8 P.M., Dec. 5)

I

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