100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 02, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STUDENTOURS
ROSE
BO WL
PACKAGES
for
University of Michigan
AIR ONLY
$14QQQ0*
Leave Saturday, December 27th
Return Sunday, January 4th

Lynn

encourages

lawyers

to

buck system

By CARLA RAPPOPORT
Conrad Lynn, a criminal lawyer
from New York City, called on law
students yesterday to fight for human
rights.
In a speech in the Lawyer's Club
Lounge, Lynn predicted a major rev-
olution of the social structure in the
United States during the 70's.
"We can't avoid it. As lawyers, you
will be in the middle of the change.
If you find a niche in a corporation,
you won't be living," said Lynn.
"Too many lawyers in my time got
caught up in the corporation jungle.
Law students today must learn to see
the weaknesses of the society and find

the techniques to drastically alter that
society," Lynn added.
Commenting on Nixon's proposed
"preventive detention bill," Lynn said
the administration is anticipating such
a social revolution. This bill proposes
that men with previous criminal rec-
ords when arrested may be held in
prison without bail until their trial.
Lynn said this bill was ridiculous
because preventive dentention already
exists. He cited several instances where
some of his clients were kept in fed-
eral prison for up to two years before
being brought to trial. "If this is the
federal situation imagine what hap-
pens on the state level."

On the subject of imperialism, Lynn
said, "The government buys allies."
Lynn mentioned te 250 million dollar
tube steel order given to Japan in order
to "buy Sato off" in the recent Oki-
nawa talks.
Lynn predicted an economic reces-
sion to strike the country soon. This
recession, due to an over-production of
market items, will lead to an indus-
trial slow-down, and thus pay cuts.
"This loss," Lynn explained, "in the
average working-man's pay will anger
him and goad him into joining the
movement for social change."
Speaking on the draft, Lynn assert-
ed, "any army the government might

call up to stop the revolution will be
ineffective." The U.S. Army is mainly
made up of the sons of middle-class
workingmen who will be angered with
the recsession hurting their parents,
Lynn said. Vietnam veterans still in
the services Lynn predicted, would not
be willing to suppress a social revolu-
tion after seeing the corruption of
Vietnam by the Americans.
"Nixon's best bet is to abolish the
draft and he knows it. The draft as it
now is can only build an army of dis-
senters," said Lynn.
Talking on the leadership of this
impending revolution, Lynn said,

"Leaders of today's revolt aren't com-
munists. He pointed out that such
organizations as the Time-Life-For-
tune syndicate and the New York
Times Company run articles and feat-
ures nearly every day on social in-
justices.
In closing Lynn emphaisized his
hope that these law students would
heed his projections and become aware
of the troubles plaguing our country.
"There will be no World War III to
save the unemployed today. The solu-
tiion lies with us; we must fight for
it," he said,

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
CHANCELLOR WILLY BRANDT threw West Germany's full
weight behind Great Britain's bid for Common Market member-
ship yesterday.
Speaking at a summit conference of Common Market nations,
Brandt also presented an ambitious plan for the strengthening of the
European economic community including the creation of a European
reserve fund, and a timetable for monetary and economic union.
However, French President Georges Pompidou repeated the de-
mand that a "definitive" arrangement for the financing of farm
prices be fixed before France will discuss new measures or the ad-
mission of new members.
BRITAIN WILL PRESS for suspension of the Greek military
regime from the Council of Europe.
Diplomatic sources reported yesterday that the move will be made
later this month despite U.S. appeals to reconsider.4
The United States is concerned that suspension would do nothing
to restore democratic rights in Greece and could cause Greece to with-
draw from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
The British believe that European public opinion is outraged over
reports of atrocities against political prisoners in Greece and theyj
think that enough votes can be gathered to suspend Greece from the
council.
JUDGE CLEMENT HAYNSWORTH JR. will confer with Pres-
ident Nixon this week on whether to remain as chief judge of the
4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
Haynsworth said Nixon was delaying a statement concerning hisj
future until he could go to Washington to talk to Nixon.
Haynsworth returned to the bench yesterday after a two-month
absence to preside over a series of school desegregation cases.
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin Laird has admitted $16.2
billion dollars in cost overruns in the military's 34 major weapons
programs.'
The overruns, disclosed by Laird in House appropriation com-
mittee testimony released yesterday, include the C5A cargo plane, the
minuteman missile, and the Navy shipbuilding program.
Laird blamed the overruns on inflation and design changes rath-
er than poor estimates.
FORMER SEN. DANIEL B. BREWSTER (D-Md), a national
mail order house, and a Washington lobbyist were indicted by a

al rP

tir4'tgttn

D&I4

page three
Tuesday, December 2, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Capt. denies role

in

Viet massacre

By The Associated Press
Atty. F. Lee Bailey, representing Capt. Ernest L. Medina,
said yesterday that Medina neither received nor gave any
orders to "butcher anyone" during a sweep through the
Vietnamese hamlet of My Lai on March 16, 1968.
"The company commander," said Bailey, referring to
Medina, "received no orders to butcher anyone or to kill any
women and children-and he issued none."
Medina, now stationed at Ft.w

9 days

---8 nights

Round Trip Non-Stop Jet
from Detroit to Los Angeles
AIR
and
ACOMMODATIONS
$215.OO*
INCLUDES-
*89 days-8 nights
" Hotel accommodations
based on 4 to a room
" Round Trip Jet Air from
Detroit
" Transfer and Baggage
handling
" Transportation to and from
Game/Parade
FOR RESERVATIONS AND
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
call or write
STUDENTOURS
In Detroit:
STUDENTOURS
20930 Mack Avenue
Grosse Pointe Woods,
Michigan 48236
886-0844
In Ann Arbor:
From 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
STUDENTOURS
located at
Apollo Music Center
322 S. Main

1Br(an(t arrives

BenningGa.,has remaindsen
while men who were under his
command described the alleged
massacre of South Vietnamese
civilians at My Lai. The leader of
Medina's first platoon, Lt. William
L. Callay Jr., was charged with the
premeditited murder of 109 per-
sons there. No charges have been
placed against Medina.
Meanwhile the South Vietnam-
ese National Assembly began its
own investigation at Song My, the
resettlement village where the sur-
vivors of My Lai now live, but re-
ported little progress.
Sen. Tran Van Don, leader of
the nine-man team, said Monday's
questioning was largely futile be-
cause the presence of about 25 ac-
companying newsmen frightened
the villagers.
He said newsmen would be bar-
red from future investigative tours,
which he said were needed so as
to "distinguish very carefully what
is the truth and what is Viet Cong
propaganda."

West German Chancellor Willy Brandt arrives at The Hague
yesterday to attend the Common Market summit conference.
'TAX REFORM ?

Mayor calls
for restraint
in Jackson
JACKSON Mich. () - The ma-
yor of Jackson called Monday on
"all in the black and white com-
munities to maintain control and
de-escalate racial tensions" in the
wake of a series of snipings.
There have been six unsolved
snipings in the past 1% months.
In addition, Sunday night, police
reported 11 shots were fired in the
area in which a white youth was
killed in September.
James J. Murphy, editor of the
Jackson Blazer, a Negro weekly
newspaper called on G o v. Wil-
liam Milliken for "immediate as-
sistance," saying this southern
1l ..titi..... ..tr .f en mn *4t.

Senate votes to cut
o il tax allowance

federal grand jury in Washington yesterday on bribery charges. WASHINGTON (P) - The Sen- I figure in the House-passed bill.
The indictment charged that Brewster received $24,500 in ex- ate voted Monday to cut the oil The two actions constituted ac-
change for his vote on "postage rate legislation" while he was a mem- and gas depletion allowance from ceptance of the Finance Commit-
I _. - 1 nr11... .. , . . i ii. '}' .nnv. nnr.4 i. r>>. f mtn f n9 n n." l r.'

(
i
i,

ber of the Senate and its Post Office and Civil Service Committee.
Attorney General John Mitchell said the indictments stemmed
from lengthy investigations by the FBI and federal grand juries in
Baltimore and Washington.
If convicted Brewster could face a maximum penalty of $90,000
and 62 years in prison.'
Brewster was -defeated last year by Republican Charles Mathias.
. * *
THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION said yester-
day that tires certified as safe by four leading manufacturers
have failed in 24 per cent of independently sponsored tests.
A 25 per cent failure rate was reported by the department last
week in another series of tests on major tire brands.
The new data showed 22 failures in 90 tests of various brands and
sizes of Armstrong, Mansfield, Seiberling, and Uniroyal tires. The tire
manufacturers have replied that motorists' experience with safe tires
should out weigh "a few isolated laboratory tests."
- - - - - - -

27% per cent to 23 per cent - in tees figure of 23 per cent, leav-
an action which had been pin- ing the final outcome to the Sen-
pointed as a measure of the chain- ate-House conference- who will be
ber's desire for major tax reform. charged with compromising t he

The 2712 per cent figure, which'
critics said had become in nearly
half a century a chief symbol of
industry favoritism, fell by a
startlingly wide margin.I
By a vote of 30 to 62, the Sen-
ate rejected an amendment by
Democrat Allen H. Ellender of
Louisiana to restore the 271 per
cent which t h e Senate Finance
Committee had voted to cut to 23
per cent.
CThe Senate then voted 52 to 38
to reject an amendment by Sen.
John J. Williams, R-Del., to cut
the allowance to 20 per cent, the
"I

two bills. The conferees c o u 1d
agree on either the 23 per cent or
the 20 per cent or, more likely,
could adopt some figure between
the two.
President Nixon in his campaign
for election endorsed the 271/2 per
cent figure and has since said he
feels it should be retained. But
he has said he will go along with
a reduction if it is the will of Con-
gress.
The reduction in the allowance
for depletion of oil and natural
gas reserves to 23 per cent would
bring in an estimated $175 million
in new revenue compared with
$345 million that the 20 per cent
House cut would yield.

Many of the men who talked MichganUityo0,700 is becom-
were protected by a Supreme Court in "virtually an armed camp"
ruling, that under present laws, with "the potential f or a holo-
former servicemen could not be caust."
tried for alleged crimes committed Milliken replied by saying he
while in the armed forces. has named two advisers to make a
Congress yesterday moved to complete report on the Jackson
close this loophole as Sen. Sam J. situation.
Ervin (D-NC) introduced a bill to The governor said further steps
permit such trials of former GI's "to be taken by my office will de-
in U.S. District Courts. pend on the outcome of these ini-
At about the same time Sen. J. tial contacts. State police are
V.FulbrighRela oAk)sCo itte available for any assistance re-
would send two investigators to quested by local authorities."
Vietnam this week to look into
"the prospects for Vietnamization The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
of the war and the general polit- Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
ical and military situation in Sal- Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
gon and the field." igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
However, Secretary of Defense Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
Melvn Lirdsai atan *n day through Sunday morning Univer-
Melvin Laird said at n sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
promptu news conference yester- carrier, $10 by mail.
day that he doubts that the al- summer session published Tuesday
leged U.S. massacre at My Lai will through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
undercut American support of the tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
Nixon administration's war policy.

}
e
a
s
e

f
i
,
P

SUBSCRIBE N(

d

1I POrUv

1

5 GREAT PLAYS!
2 Performances Each
FR.-SAT, JAN. 23-24
"A REAL TRIUMPH"
BEST PLAY'
I,.. D2NA Cwx$ MW r-
im A x8 ~I
AF 19b8,e
a14c1 GrndeNsttRN
*A~e ed'

TUES.-WED, FEB. 24-25
AfTHUf >

"The LIBERTINE'
COMES ACROSS
INCREDIBLY
WITH WRY
HUMOR
AND TASTE.ar

IIXiI
persons under 18
not admitted
features
7:15 and 9:00
'Makes
Hugh Hefner's
Playboy Penthouse
look like a
nursery school!"

WED.THURS. FE. 4-5
'A STUNNING MUSICAL BRIIIANTLY CONCEIVED"
-KERR NKY TIMES

WEDTURS, MARCH 18-19
BEST MUSICAL
NEW YORK
O RAMA CRITICS c
CIRCLE AWARD 1968r,

OuRz
4%US m

"Catherine Spaak
is Curious Green,
with envy...and
decides to become
a one-woman
Kinsey sex survey.'

I

'"WqW"A

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan