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November 26, 1969 - Image 3

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SUBSCRIBE NOW!

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

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page three
Wednesday, November 26, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

THE DEPARTMENT OF Health; Education and Welfare de-
tailed Tuesday what it called widespread misuse of federal aid
money in Mississippi schools.
The department's investigation concluded that federal aid aimed
at enriching the curriculum for poor children was being used to meet
the schools' normal operating expenses. A further finding was that
federal money has financed building construction and portable class-

i
i

Nixon

rooms that furthered racial discrimination.
THE UNITED STATES is keeping up the withdrawal of U.S.
troops from Vietnam beyond the goal announced by President
Nixon last September, a Pentagon spokesman said yesterday.
Nixon's stated objective, the withdrawal of 60,000 U.S. troops by;
Dec. 15, was reached last week. This was about 25 days earlier than
planned.
The Pentagon spokesman described the withdrawal as an "on-
going, continuing program" and said the United States is maintain-
ing the momentum of withdrawal.
A new presidential statement, expected by late December, will set
new goals which likely will bring the total of troops withdrawn to over
100,000 by early 1970.

use

of

renounces
b iological

all

U.S.

weapons

1

WICOA14U#. MnAtcN 15.
::I 2SA A C5''.S O~
A CHERFU, JOYFUL &L 72.7j~c
BLISSFULLY IRREVERENST
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charge Army
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By The Associated Press
VICE PRESIDENT SPIRO T. AGNEW has no desire to keep Antiwar leaders at Barksdale Air
up his attacks on the news media, a spokesman said yesterday, Force Base, La., say men h a v e
and will very likely let the matter drop. beestdetedraserredntior In-
Agnew is described as believing he has made his point and stim- vestigated because of antiwar ac-
ulated discussion and self-examination among the press and tele- tirities.
vision. He has attacked both in nationally broadcasted speeches ini Other protesters, Army fied
the ast wo weks.hospital soldiers in Vietnam,
the past two weeks. were told yesterday that they face
The vice president's next scheduled address will be Dec. 11 at a possible disciplinary action f o r
conference of Republican governors in Hot Springs, Ark. There, Her- planning a 24-hour Thanksgiving
bert Thompson, Agnew's press secretary said, Agnew will most likely Day fast.
! speak on an entirely different subject. At Barksdale, a Strategic A i r
Command (SAC) base of 7,000
men, organizers charged that the
NORTH VIETNAMESE and U.S. troops fought a series of I Air Force obstructed their ef-
battles yesterday along the Cambodian border. forts to express dissent legally and
The battle, one of the largest in weeks involving American troops, harassed some men by putting
took place at the base of Black Virgin Mountain. them in posts where access to
The Americans reported 25 North Vietnamese killed in the fight- classified material was denied.
ing in dense underbrush and nine more in other action. Two Ameri- Leaders of the protest group
i ~said that during the Oct. 151
cans were killed and 18 wounded. Moratorium, some of them had
The action was one of the largest in recent weeks involving been sent out of the state for over-
American troops. Most of the recent fighting has been between North due medical examinations while
and South Vietnamese, who the Communist command apparently has others had been detained for ques-I
been testing as government troops are gradually assuming a larger tioning by investigators and were
combat role. forced to miss protest activities.
In Pleiku, Vietnam, Col. Joseph
Bellas, commander of the 71st
BEATLE-JOHIN LENNON sent back the medal Queen Eliza- Evacuation Hospital said that the
beth II gave him, saying he was protesting "British Involvement fast leaders would be subject to
in the Nigeria-Biafra thing and our support of America in Viet- punishment not solely because of
nam." the fast but because they also pub-
The award was Lennon's membership of the Order of the British' licized it.
Empire, which was given to all the Beatles for helping Britain earn protest fast told newsmen they
dollars. had collected the names of 165
Lennon said he thought the British government action against soldiers on a letter explaining the
Biafra was disgraceful and, although he was patriotic, it had made reasons for their action.
him almost ashamed to be an Englishman. "As long as Americandsoldiers
* " continue to fight and die in a
ADLAI E. STEVENSON III was endorsed by Democratic senseless war that cannot be won,
party slatemakers yesterday as their 19'78 candidate for the U.S. 'wte the undersigned feel that we
partyeatemaers. etrdyat. have very little to be. thankful
Senate from Iillinois. for," the letter read.

CBS President Frank Stanton
CBS presi dent hits
Anew's media stand
NEW YORK D - Dr. Frank Stanton, president of the
Columbia Broadcasting System, said yesterday that it does
not take overt censorship of the news media by the govern-
ment to "cripple the free flow of ideas."
He said the "ominous character" of Vice President Spiro
T. Agnew's criticism of television news media "derives di-
rectly from the fact that it is made upon the journalism of a
medium licensed by the government of which he is a high
ranking officer."
Speaking to communications industry leaders at an In-
ternational Radio &,Television Society luncheon at the Pla-
za Hotel, Stanton s a i d the--

WASHINGTON D. - Presi-
dent Nixon announced yester-
day t h a t the United States
will never use germ warfare-
even if attacked by an enemy
using such weapons.
The President also endorsed
"the principles and objectives" of
a British-sponsored proposal for
an international agreement to ban
the use of biological warfare tac-
tics.
Nixon promised to destroy all
existing stockpiles of bacteriolog-
ical weapons and to halt all fur-
ther research on such weapons.
In the future, the President told
newsmen, research will be confin-
ed to efforts to counter any germ
warfare attack. These might in-
clude development of immuniza-
tion shots to protect the popula-
tion.
Because of the shift of research
emphasis, programs of this kind
henceforth will be supervised by
the Department of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare rather than
fby the Pentagon.
Nixonalso broadened the offi-
cial policy on u se of chemical
weapons - notably poison gas -
in war, to include incapacitating
agents.
The President's announcement
capped a six-month review of
chemical and biological defense
policies and programs, completed
last week by the National Security
Council.
"On the basis of this review," he
told reporters, "I made a number
of decisions which I believe will
sharply reduce the chance that
these weapons, either chemicalor
bacteriological will ever be used
by any nation."
"Mankind already carries in its
own hands too many of the seeds
of its o w n destruction," Nixon
said. "By the examples that we
set today, we hope to contribute
to an atmosphere of peace and
understanding between all na-
tions."
In a more formal printed state-
ment, Nixon said he regarded his
moves "as an initiative toward
peace."
The President acted after Con-
gress had shown marked reluc-
tance to appropriate money for
germ warfare research. And there
were indications that destruction
of present stockpiles of bacteriol-
ogical weapons would pose little
problem since, it was understood,
they deteriorate rapidly.
Meanwhile, in the United Na-
tions General Assembly, the Brit-
ish plan was coming under sharp
attack from the Soviet Union. So-
viet Delegate A. A. Roschin pro-
posed a draft treaty backed by the
Soviet Union and eight other com-
munist states.
The communist prgposal de-
manded a b a n on all chemical
weapons, as well as biological ones.
Diplomats expect that the General
Assembly will refer both drafts to
Geneva for detailed consideration.
While terming his decisions
"major initiatives in the disarma-
ment field," the Nixon statement
said the moves he was taking will
not leave the United States "vul-
nerable to surprise by an enemy
who does not observe these ration-
al restraints."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 784-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by malt.
summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

Although the 38-year-old state treasurer had offended party ?
regulars in the past with his independence, he apparently pacified
them. Stevenson was chosen by 80 Illinois Democratic leaders over named assistant director of Place-
six others who sought the endorsement. ment Services effective Dec. 1. ac-
While the primary still lies ahead, there is little doubt that with cording to Evart W. Ardis, direc-
the party organization's backing Stevenson will have any trouble tor.
winning. Audas, who has worked in stu-

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THE MICHIGAN HEAR
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CORONARY CARE UNITS, with an ultimate potential of
saving 54,000 lives a year, are one of several Michigan Heart
Association heart saving programs. In four years the Associa-
tion, a Michigan United Fund member, has helped increase
CCU's in Michigan from none to 91. Advances in medical treat-
ment since 1950, when the Government and Heart Associations
began massive research, have reduced cadiovascular death
rates of persons under 65 by 20.1%. Still, heart and circulatory
diseases continue to kill more Americans under 65 than cancer,
accidents and pneumonia combined.
For further information on CCU training, write CCU,
Michigan Heart Association, 13100 Puritan, Detroit 48227.

Reesed by COLUMBIA PCTURES
COLORjJ
Program Information 662-6264
SHOWS at 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9:05 P.M.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

dent center management at West-
ern Michigan and Eastern Michi-
gan Universities, will succeed
David A. Gillette.

vice president used "misin-
formation, inaccuracies and
contradictions" to "strength-
en the delusion that... tele-
vision is plunging the nation
into collapse and can be de-
terred only by suppressing
criticisms and by either with-
holding bad news or contriv-
ing a formula to balance it
with good news."
Stanton said that because of
implicit intimidation in Agnew's
criticism, his repeated disavowals,
of censorship are meaningless.
"Reprisals no less damaging to
the media and no less dangerous
to our fundamental freedoms than
censorship a r e readily available
to the government-economic, legal
and psychological," he said.
"N o r is their actual employ-
ment necessary to achieve their
ends; to have them dangling like
swords o v e r the media can do
harm even more irreparable than
overt action."

Apollo crew
heads home
ABOARD USS HORNET 0P)-
The Apollo 12 crew remained yes-
terday under the watchful eye of
a doctor who wants to practice
medicine on the moon.
Dr. Clarence Jernigan, who
aspires to be the first physician
on the moon, pronounced Charles
Conrad Jr., Richard F. Gordon Jr.
and Alan L. Bean in excellent
health after they were plucked
from the Pacific after their Mon-
day splashdown.
They are scheduled to be flown
early Saturday to the Manned
1 Spacecraft Center at Houston
where they will continue in quar-
antine in the elaborate Lunar Re-
ceiving Laboratory.
Eighty to 100 pounds of moon
rocks Conrad and Bean gathered
like Easter eggs from the moon
arrived last evening at the lunar
guarantine station in Houston.
All three men had minor skin
iritations from the biomedical sen-
sors that had been attached to
their bodies during much of their
10-day mission.
It was only natural that Jer-
nigan was in quarantine with the
astronauts.
"When we establish a manned
lunar station," he said recently,
"I'm sure they'll have a dispensary
up there and I'd like to run it."

"The LIBERTINE'
COMES ACROSS
INCREDIBLY
WITH WRY
HUMOR
AND TASTE. 4
-Harper's Bazaar
"Catherine Spaak
is Curious Green,
with envy...and
decides to become
a one-woman
Kinsey sex survey."

IM FIF';TH ForU
persons under 18
not admitted

THAT
DOG
ON
WHEELS
IS
COMING

I NOW

Shows today
7:15, 9:00
'Makes
Hugh Hefner's
Playboy Penthouse
look like a
nursery school!"

- SKINNY
THE
ONE '

WHAT MAKES PEOPLE LAUGH SO
HARD THEY CRY? Laurel and Hardy
were perhaps the funniest comedy
team who ever lived. They probably
couldn't tell you why. They just knew
how.
And the reason the secret remains a
secret - is because nobody really
knows the answer. All you can really
do is look at those geniuses carrying
on-and sit back and laugh. The best

I

Bel Midrash of Ann Arbor

I

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Hebrew (Intermediate) -Modern Hebrew Literature
-Hebrew (Advanced) -Seminar on Peace
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