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November 21, 1969 - Image 6

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 21, 1969

TO PREPARE FACT SHEET:

I

Young Dems discuss strategy
in fight for legalization of 'pot'

RETURNED OVERSEAS VOLUNTEERS
R. P. C U 's, I. V S etc.
PARTY
Call Diana, 769-0947 for info.
Friday, Nov. 21--9 P.M.

By ART LERtNER
Preliminary plans for waging a
campaign to legalize marijuana,
%ere discussed at last night's
meeting of the Young Democrats.
The YD's agreed to gather in-
formation from scientific studies
and print a fact sheet on mari-
juana to mobilize campus support.
The YDs believe they can be
successful in the legalization drive
because their group is an "estab-
lishment" organization in the
"mainstream" of American politics.
Much of the discussion centered
around what groups to pressure
and the tactics that might be em-
ployed. Several members pointed
out that a legislator who is recep-
tive to legalization may be wary
of taking a stand because of the
political consequences involved.
Others suggested sending liberal
congressmen information in t h e
mail which advocates the legali-
zation of pot. There was also some
interest expressed in testing the
present marijuana laws in t h e
courts.
But one member pointed out
that Ann Arbor because of re-
latively light court sentences
handed down here -- might not be
a good location to press for court
action.
Another said that waging such
a fight required substantial finan-
cial backing, which the YD's do
not presently have.
"Give for grass" was suggested
as the slogan for a bucket drive
to raise money for the legalization
campaign.
It was also mentioned that
smoking tobacco is illegal in Mich-
igan for those under 21, although
tobacco can actually be purchased
at the age of 18. This, one stu-
dent argued, shows the absurdity
of the present legal system as well
as the inequity in enforcement of
laws by the state.
YD's have previously expressed
support for the rent strike and

the grape boycott and have re-!
cently been working in coopera-
tion with the New Mobilization'
Committee.
The group has also coordinated
its efforts with other Young Dem-

ocrats' chapters to modernize and
reform the Democratic p a r t y
structure. Students are already
active within the Ann Arbor Dem-
ocratic party as vice-chairmen
and precinct chairmen.

l

Gradual revolution
overruns Ed school

RAICAL. CAUCUS
INTERNAL EDUCATION DINNER
"WOMEN'S LIBERATION"
6:00-FRIDAY
GUILD MHOUSE
802 Monroe

The sur vi ors
These Vietnamese men, now located at a government resettlement center at Son My, claim to be
the survivors of a massacre of hundreds of Vietnamese men, women and children on March 16,
1968. On that day a company of American GIs allegedly entered the hamlet of Mai-Tai No. 4,
rounded up the villagers, and shot them because they believed most to be Viet Cong, or Viet Cong
sympathizers. The men said they survived by playing dead. Most of them do have old bullet wounds.
NEWS MONO POLY:
Agnew raps Post, NY Times

('ontinmed from i e 1
Prof. Percy Bates, who along
with Prof. Alvin Loving, the
school's other black faculty mem-
her, works in the caucus, feels a
time limit is not important. "As
long as we are moving toward that
goal. it doesn't matter if we ever'
reach it. It's a question of moving
in a direction," he says.
However, more formidable prob-
lems logistical ones- face the
education school. A program ofj
recruitment of faculty and stu-
dents will be costly, especially at a
University where the budget is al-
ready tight.
Everyone in the school relies1
on Dean Cohen to secure suffi-
cient resources to develop the de-
sired programs.
If black students and professors
do not meet current admission and
employment standards the Uni-
versity may have to junk its pre-
sent standards.
Some of the education s c h o o 1
students and faculty hopa so.
Buntin feels the present admission
standards for undergraduates
should be revised. But since the
education school does not admit
undergraduates until junior year.
the admission of more blacks will
necessitate a change in standards
by the University's office of ad-
missions.
Either LSA will have to create
a mechanism to handle the new
students during their first two
years, or the School of Education

will have to begin admitting stu-
dents in freshman year.
Faculty members are quick to
point out that the new admissions
policies will not amount to a quota
system or "open door policy where
kids last only one semester." Prof.
Arthur F. Coxford explains that
the school's tendency is not to,
dramatically increase its size, but
to make sure the students who
enroll successfully complete the
programs.
Other faculty expect that the
endorsement of the demands in-
dicates a shift in the orientation
of the school away from increas-
ing size and the number of certi-
fied teachers produced. Prof. Loren
Barritt expects more experimen-
tal education programs can be de-
veloped along the lines suggested
by a special study of the school
made last year. But the professor
is reluctant to predict what spe-
cific directions change will take.
"This is a chancey business,
certainly," Barritt says. "But it is
terribly exciting."

See Ann Arbor's own
FLO""ATING "OPERA
n a benefit dance-concert
FRIDAY, NOV. 21, 1969
8:30-11:30 P.M., UNION BALLROOM
BENEFIT: UNIVERSAL LIFE CHURCH
DONATION 50c

iCoutinued iromPage Ii
should get up at a PTA luncheon
in Sioux City and attack the Pres-
ident's Vietnam policy, my guess'
is that you would probably find it
reported somewhere the next
morning in the New York Times,
But when 300 congressmen en-
dorse the President's Vietnam
policy, the next morning it is
apparently not considered news fit
to print," charged Agnew.
In coinil
st Lde~lt e(
(Continued from Page 1)
rate of interest on the money
which would be borrowed to fi-
nance construction. The tuition
increase would be used to pay off
the loan.
Smith's letter to Canhai also
indicated the administration had
ruled out the possibility of reno-
vating the Waterman-Barbour
gymnasiums.
This, Smith wrote. "would cost
a minimum of 50 per cent of the
proposed new structure and would
yield a building of uncertain life,
limited program, inefficient oper-
ation and located on a site which
is far more appropriate for aca-
demic undertakings."
At the committee's mneting yes-
terday, there was mention of hold-
ing a referendum to determine

He also blasted the Washington
Post Co. saying, "A single com-
pany, in the nation's capital, holds
control of the largest newspaper
in Washington. D.C., and one of
the four major television sta-
tions, and an all-news radio sta-
tion, and one of the three major
national news magazines - all
grinding out the same editorial
line."
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, presi-
ttee advises
lnsl tation1
student opinion on the funding
question, but no definite decision
was made.
One committee member, Educa-
tion School Prof. Loren Barrett,
said "it is unthinkable to go
ahead with student funding with-
out eliciting support for that
funding."
But he added, "since fe('s will
not be levied until the facilities
are opened, students voting now
would be dictating what a future
generation of students would have
to pay."
Smith has said he will welcome
student input, on the funding
question, but added he doubts the
result of a student referendum on
the question would be given signi-
ficant weight by the administra-
tion.

dent and publisher of the Times,
responded in a statement, that
"Vice President Agnew is entitled
to expriess his point of view, but
he is in error when he implies
that the New York Times ever
sought or enjoyed immunity Ironi
comment or criticism...
Sulzbeirge'r also' reacted to Ag-
new's charge that. the Times did
'not carry a vord' on a story
about congressmnen and senators
endorsing President Nixon's Viet -
nam policy. It failed to make the
city edition--which reaches Wash-
ington, but wvas cariied. he said,
in a later edition.
Katherine Gralham, president of
the Washiignion Post Co. and pub-
lisher of the Post, denied that the
Post "gi'inds otit the same edi-
toirial line.''
"It is a long standing policy of
the Post Co. to enlist in each of its
enterprises the best professional
journalists we can find and give
them a maximum of freedom in
which to work," she claimed.
The Society of Naval Architects
and Marine Engineers has award-
ed two of thiee prizes for student-
written papers to University stu-
dents.

David Mill 'iand Andras
both i naval architecture
marin enmieering received

Toro.
and
$100.

ALTERNATIVES
-IN
EDUCATION
CIDOC INVITES YOU TO

JANUARY 19
T O--
APRIL 25
CUERNAVACA for sixteen

PROSPECTIVE
LAW STUDENTS !
Representativesf rom the Law
Schools of Universtv of Miami
(Florida) and Georqe Washing-
ton Universitv will be here Fri-
dov, Nov. 21 (UM) and Mon-
doy, Nov. 24 (GWU) Phone
the Jr.-Sr. Counselina Office for
details, 764-0312.

seminars aimed at finding ways to free education
from schooling. Seminar leaders will include:
JEROME BRUNER JOHN HOLT
PAULO FREIRE IVAN ILLICH
PAUL GOODMAN JONATHAN KOZOL
Take the entire program or enroll in individual seminars. Take advon-
tage of conference and courses on Latin America and of INTENSIVE
INSTRUCTION IN SPOKEN SPANISH.
For detailed information write: CWOC-SPRING 1970
APDO 479, CUERNAVACA, MEXICO

WHY
Abb THIS TA6II ABOUT BbUES,
UNDERGROUND, HARD-ROGK,
GOUNTRY AND BUBBbE GUM,
ETG.
WHEN IN FAGT WE'RE REAbbY
TAbKING ABOUT
GOOD SONGS s GOOD SOUNDS
...IN SHORT...
ENTERTAINMENT!
A GROUP GALLED SMITH
IS
ENTERTAINMENT~

/J

F4
"<1
=..'

Little
Banking
Trick

Z55nZ4

Do all your banking in one place" It's more convenient to
keep your Savings account and Checking account at the same
place. If you need a loan, your banker can make a decision

x R Y k

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