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November 19, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-19

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r'

RADICAL FILM SERIES
presents
THE YOUNG AND THE DAMNED
Directed by LUIS BUNUEL
Bunuel who is "an old hand at blending surrealist imagery with leftist social protest
... has always had a special gift for making us see and feel the horrors with which
we know life abounds but which we so devoutly prefer to avoid discussing."-Life.
In Young and the Damned (filmed in Mexico as Los Olvidados) he presents a bru.-
tal study of slum children running wild on the outskirts of Mexico City, where they
steal, beat up a blind beggar, attack a legless man and commit murder. Bunuel ex-
amines the piles of rubble, squallid hovels and garbage heaps where poeple scrounge
for food like animals.
"There is nothing imagined in this film. It is all merely true." Bunuel
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19 7-9-11 P.M.
Admission 75c
CANTERBURY HOUSE-330 Maynard
+ Use Daily Classifieds +
The School of Music and Department of Art
November 21, 22, 24, and 25
8:00 P.M.
Conductor: Josef Blatt
Stage Director: Ralph Herbert
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
0 to All Tickets $3.00
r Information 764-6118
Box Office open: 12:30-5:00 P.M. Nov. 17-20
12:30-8:00 P.M. Nov. 21, 22, 24 and 25
(in English) GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
- -

x4r

Sfipiitn

3 ttti#

NEWS PHONE:
764-055

tree

Wednesday, November 19, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Paperwork swamps draft

By The Associated Press
Paperwork is piling up at d r a f t
boards in some of the nation's large
cities, due largely to an increase of
conscientious objector applications,
requests for hardship deferments, and
staff shortages a survey shows.
"People are a lot more aware of their
rights and they're taking advantage of
them," said Maj. William Sangemino,
head of the Manpower and Training
office of New York City Selective Ser-
vice.
In an Associated Press survey of 10
areas in the country, New York, Chi-
cago, Detroit, Denver, Baltimore and
Los Angeles, all reported a paperwork
increase.
Heavy deferment requests and ap-
peals were cited by a spokesman for
Los Angeles County draft boards,
which are opening their doors at 10
a.m. instead of 8 a.m., providing two
hours to handle a growing amount of
paperwork.
New York City's 96 draft boards have

been ordered to close each day at 2
p.m. instead of 5 p.m. and spend the
three afternoon hours catching up on
their work.
Sangemino said the pileup was
caused by prospective draftees claim-
ing deferment as conscientious objec-
tors or hardship cases. There also have
been staff shortages, with some per-
sonnel diverted to restore records de-
stroyed during the summer by antiwar
vandals.
Increased draft calls since the esca-
lation of the Vietnam war, plus appli-
cations by conscientious objectors and
hardship cases were highlighted as the
causes of a crush of paperwork at De-
troit's f i1v e boards. However, normal
business hours have been maintained.
"There are a lot more conscientious
objectors these days," said one em-
ploye in Detroit.
Some draft boards in Chicago and
other parts of Illinois are closing for
one hour in the morning. John Ham-

mack, head of the Illinois Selective
Service, said lack of personnel is a
problem.
"There has been some increase in
requests for deferments and conscien-
tious objector status, but not alarm-
ingly so," Hammack added. "Especial-
ly in the farm areas, they think it's a
matter of obligation. 'Dad went, so I'll
do my part for my country' - that's
their attitude.
"There are some in the cities who
have been handed everything and they
don't want to do their part. It's very
hard to convince the public that con-
scientious objectors are a luxury -
only a strong nation can afford them."
Chicago's Selective Service director,
Col. John Siegle, said most of the in-
creased paperwork in that area is the
result of the postwar baby boom, with
those youngsters now coming of age.
He said "maybe 30 per cent" could be
attributed to more deferment requests.
At one Baltimore draft b o a r d, a

I
C
V

iii

the-1
news today
b) The Associated Press and College Press Service

I

THE HOUSE RULES COMMITTEE yesterday voted to con-
tinue a bill for five more years protecting black voting rights in
the south.
The bill which passed 9-6 extends the 1965 Voting Rights Act'
banning literacy tests in seven states and authorizing federal officials
to register blacks and help them vote.
President Nixon has urged Congress to replace the 1965 bill with
one which eliminates literacy tests in all states and filing a standard
residency requirement for voting in presidential elections.
Rep. Emanual Celler (D-N.Y.), manager of the extension bill,
said 800,000 blacks have been registered because of the 1965 bill.
The bill is expected to reach the house floor next week.
* ,~ *
THE SENATE TALLY swayed in favor of Judge Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr.'s nomination to the Supreme Court as Sen. Ralph
T. Smith (R-Ill.), announced yesterday he will vote affirmative.
Earlier in the day Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska) also said he
would vote in favor of the nomination bringing the vote to 41-40 fort
Haynsworth.
The final Senate vote has been set for noon Friday.
* * *
THE UNITED STATES AND SOVIET UNION held their first
disarmament session yesterday in Helsinki, Finland,
Discussion centered around how to stop the nuclear arms race,
but no results of the talks were announced. A second work session is
scheduled for tomorrow. This indicates sessions will be held on al-
ternative days for the strategic arms limitations talks (SALT).
NON-NUCLEAR COUNTRIES voiced opposition to U.S.-Soviet ef-
forts to gain U.N. approval of a treaty aimed at keeping the seabed
free of nuclear weapons.
The nations, led by Canada, also objected to drafts of agree-
ments for preventing biochemical warfare.
Canadian delegate George Ignatieff demanded further modifica-!
tion of the draft treaty because it failed to meet many countries
expectations.

boards
spokesman said, "Our workload is
very high." But another in Baltimore
reported, "There are more conscien-
tious objectors now, but we don't have
any serious backlog."
Maj. Paul Baldwin, deputy director
of Selective Service in Colorado, said
in Denver, "We're plenty busy," but
that so far all nine draft boards in
the Denver area are maintaining nor-
mal hours, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., five
days a week.
"We have some conscientious people
who are putting in extra h o u r s in
some cases because of a heavy run of
work and temporary shortage of em-
ployes," Baldwin said.
Col. Richard Davis, coordinator of
t h e San Francisco Selective Service
headquarters th a t includes 54 draft
boards in 16 northern California coun-
ties, said, "We probably have a back-
log from time to t i m e, particularly
since some of the boards are short-
staffed primarily due to retirements."
Weathermen
arrested on
conspiracy
23 on murder count;
three homes raided
By The Associated Press
Police raided three C a m -
bridge, Mass. homes Monday
night and arrested 23 persons
on charges of assault to mur-
der and conspiracy to murder
in a Nov. 8 shooting at police
headquarters.
Officers identified the 14 men
and 9 women in custody as mem-
bers of the Weatherman faction
of Students for a Democratic So-
ciety.
The raiding party of more than
20 officersmconfiscated various
weapons, ammunition, shotgun
Judkis shells, and pamphlets.
In the Nov. 8 incident at police
headquarters, two shots were fired
argas through a first-floor window. No
ming one was injured.
Police said they also want to
question Eric Mann, 26, Cam-
bridge, a leader of the Weather-
man group.
James K. Kilpatrick, 22, and
James H. Reaves, 22, both identi-
a fying themselves as Northeastern
University students, were charged
with assault to murder and con-
spiracy to murder, with bail at
$10,000 each.
The other 21 were charged with
conspiracy to murder and bail was
set at $1,000 each.
Mann previously was charged
)lumbia with assault in connection with
ent into a Sept. 25 raid on thetHarvard
got out Center for International Affairs in
His in- which about 20 persons invaded
e, t h e the building, assaulted several
d hold- staff members and stenciled ob-
d movie scenities on the walls.
At Princeton University yester-
h, esti- day about 80 members of SDS
d from blocked entrances to a Pentagon-
sponsored "think tank," preventing
Securi- its 40 employesfrom entering.
aritime Ronald Butler, a Princeton,
ly years senior, was arrested and charged
tration with assault and battery after he
ambas- allegedly attacked a man attemp-
ting to enter the Institute for De-
fense Analysis (IDA).
nation About 10 policemen quickly
dolenc- gathered at the building, but took
red his no action. They said they were
strong awaiting instructions from the in-
nation." stitute

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $10 by mail.
Summer Session. published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

-Daily-Jim
It's a gas!
A student presents President Robben Fleming with a te.
cannister at yesterday afternoon's Presidential Tea. Fle
reportedly laughed heartily at the gift.
FORMER AMBASSADOR:
JosephKennedy d
after lengthy ilnc

WHY
ALL THIS TALK ABOUT BLUES,
UNDERGROUND, HARD-ROGK,
GOUNTRY AND BUBBIE GUM,
ETC.?
WHEN IN FAGT WE'RE REAIbY
TAbIING ABOUT
GOOD SONGS F GOOD SOUNDS
...IN SHORT...
ENTERTAINMENT!
HE GRASSROOTS
Is
ENTERTAINMELT
HEY HAVE A NEW AIJbBUM THAT INGbUDES
WAIT A MIbbION YEARS s HEAVEN KNOWS

** * HYANNISPORT. MASS. '(P) - He gained control of Co
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday asked for a new trade law Joseph P. Kennedy, who amassed Trust Co. at 25 and then we
that would simultaneously encourage international commerce and one of America's biggest fortunes, the stock market - butg
protect American industries damaged by imports. and served as ambassador to Brit- before the crash of 1929.1
ain, died yesterday at 11:05 a.m. terests included real estat
The bill has several features, including liberalization of the law Kennedy was the father of the sale of Scotch Whiskey, an
which allows industries hurt by imports to ask for protection through late President John F. Kennedy ings in motion pictures an
such tariff increases on import quotas. and Sen. Robert F. Kennedy (D- houses.
In a message to Congress, Nixon called his trade bill "modest in N.Y.) He is survived by his wife At the time of his deat
scope, but significant in its impact." and son, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy mates of his wealth range
He also said that he would appoint a commission on world trade. (D-Mass>. I $200 to $400 million.
The elder Kennedy had b e en Kennedy served on the
AMERICAN BANKS have been a haven for huge sums ille- ariei ties Exchange and the M
gaily channeled out of South Vietnam in a billion dollar currency heart attack Saturday and had Commisions during the earl
manipulation racket, investigating Senators were told yesterday. been reported growing progress- of the Roosevelt admini
The U.S. banks serve as a collection point for money, a U.S. offi- ively weaker. s tand w laterna e 19S.
cial testified. He added it is generated by a highly organized criminal Kennedy graduated from Har-
syndicate centered in Saigon with ties throughout the world. vard College in 1912 and it is said President Nixon led the
synce Acentef(DCn.,redinSigondwithtiesnthrougot the wuorldthat his biggest ambition at that in sending tributes and con
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D-Cann.), presiding at the subcommittee time was to become a millionaire es, saying Kennedy "inspi
hearings, said the racket has had a disastrous effect on the South by the age of 35. He achieved his family to share his own
Vietnamese economy. goal well before then. sense of dedication to his n

THE BEST OF MUSC...
from past and present
The U of M Men's Glee Club
JOINT CONCERTS with

I

DIAL 5-6290
The motion picture de-
signed to save the world
from sanity.

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