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November 18, 1969 - Image 6

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 18, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IMPROVED CURRICULUM

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A hidden sh
for junior
Brief little sli
a lightlys
bra complen
the young
fashion idea
in sun coral
violet. . s
in non-cli
with a
Slip, 5-13 s
Bra, 32-36
Half-slip, 5
Not shoa
5-13 si

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/,
iow of color
s by Warner's
{
ips and
shaped '
ment
or
heer luxury
ng 'nylon crepet
appliques.
izes. 6.00
A. B. 4.00
-13 sizes.4.00
vn: Bikini pant,
zes. 2. 25
Y-

By ANITA WETTERSTROEM
A group.of students and fac-
ulty members in the physics de-
partment is taking steps toward
revamping the undergraduate
curriculum.
The Physics Curriculum Com-
mittee, the brain child of fac-
ulty members, is made up of
three professors, one graduate
student and five undergraduates.
The committee will review
courses to determine deficiencies
and overlap in course material.
The main tasks of the com-
miteee, which sees itself as more
of a concerned citizens group
than a representative body, will
be researching course material
and talking to the instructors
about courses needing revision.
In other words, said Dr. Harvey
Gould, one of the initiators of
the committee, "It's mostly leg
work."
Having no formal authority.
their method for effecting
changes will be "simple convin-
cing," he said.
Overlap in courses was the
major concern expressed at the

committee's first formal meeting
Friday. Following one student's
report of the course material in
Physics 405, another student ex-
claimed "That's 438."
Dr. Gabriel Weinrich identi-
fied the problem as one of de-
termining "what is necessary
for students to know and what
is necessary for (individual'
courses." The problem, he said,
is compounded by "the wide
variety of students with a va-
riety of backgrounds."
Another dimension of the
problem, according to Nancy
Federman, a student on t h e
committee, is that of coordinat-
ing investigation to cover phy-
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
3328 LSA before 2 p.m. of the day
preceding publication and by ?
p.m. Friday for Saturday and Sun-
day. Items may appear only once.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. Ior
information, phone 764-9270,
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER I8
Day Calendar
Real Estate Institute: Michigan tin..
io, 9:00 a.n
Physics & Astronomy 'Theoretical
seminar: G. Furlan, Institute for Ad-
vanced Study, Princeton, "Current Al-
gebra": P&A Colloquim Room, 4:00
p.mn.
Degree Recital: Marion Schrock, clar-

sics requireIents in the math
department.
Ken Perlow, another student
member, is dissatisfied with
"professors who seal themselves
off on North Campus with their
cyclotrons and a few grad stu-
dents,
"They hold weird, impossible
office hours like 4 to 5 on Fri-
day afternoons," he complain-
ed, "and refuse to discuss course
material at any other' time."
Perlow is not sure whether the
Committee will be able to rem-
edy such problems.
"No instructor's in danger of
losing his job." said Perlow, "so
iet : School of Music Recitai Hall, 8:00
p.mi
Sigma 'theta Tatt( Ro Chapter) An-
nual Lecture: Dr. Rozella Schlotf'ldt,
D3ean. Frances Payne Bolton School of
Nursing, Cleveland, "Nursing and Nurs-
ing Education: Models for the 70's'":
T1owsley Center, 8:00 p.mn.
Degree Recital: Allan Shaffer, organ:
Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Department of Psychiatry Lecture:
Harold L Lief, M.D., Director, Division
of Family Study, University of Penn-
sylania. i'"Training in Marriage Coun-
seling for Psychiatrists": CPH Audi-
tor um.800 p.m.
General Notices'
St tident 'accounts:Your attention is
(alled to the following rules passed
by the Regents on February 28, 1936:
'Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or sum-
mer session Student loans which are
not paid or renewed are subject to this
regulation, however, student loans not
yet due are exempt. Any unpaid ac-
counts at the close of business on the
l-t day of classes will be reported to
the Cashier of the University and
iar All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester

they are really not too concern-
ed."
Perlow also described short-
comings in Physics 125: "The
labs are horrible. If they weren't
so easy they would be hated."
Someone suggested that since
the majority of students taking
125 are pre-med students, per-
haps the department should re-
structure the material to better
fit their needs.
Weinrich disagreed, He said
it was the medical school's de-
cision to make 125 a prerequis-
ite therefore "it is the med
school's problem, not ours."
"We have enough problems of
our own," Gould said.
or sunnr session just complete will
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
-i) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or summer
session until payment has been made."
WINTER COMMENCEMENT
EXERCISES
DECEMBER 13, 1969
To be held at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Aid-
itorium. All graduates of the 1969 fall
term may attend.
Reception for graduates, their rela-
tives and friends in Michigan League
Ialroom immediately following t It e
ccereony. Please enter League at west
entr an1ce.
Tickets: Four to each prospective
graduate, to be distributed from Mon-
day, December 1, to 1:00 p.m. Satur-
day, December 13, at the Diploma De-
partment, 1518 L.S.&A. Building, ex-
cept on Saturday, December 6, when
office will be closed. Saturday, Decem-
her 13, office will be open from 9:00
am.. to 1:00 p.m.
.Academic Costume: May be rented
at Moe Sport Shop, 711 North Univer-
s:itv avenue. Orders should be placed
Coitinu d on Page 10)
ORGATNIZATION
NOTICES

Physics group strives for reform

Is Washington Enough?
RADICAL CAUCUS
Moss Organizational Meeting
On War Research
8:00 TUESDAY
2nd Floor SAB

U-M Oceanological Society: Regular
meeting Tuesday, November 18, room
10-8 Natural Resources Building, 7:00
p.m. Our guest speaker will be Pro-
fessor Karl F. Lagler speaking on the
United Nations' Food and Agriculture
Organization and world fishery re-
sources. Coffee and refreshments after-
wards. All welcome.
Concert Dance Organization, Nov. 18,
'tue. 7:00 p.m., Barbour Gym for
Men's Modern Dance Class . . . 8:00
p.n. for for Beginning Intermediate
Ballet. Nov. 19, Wednesday at 7:15 p.mu
for Advanced Modern Technique, Ba-
bour Gym.
University Lutheran Chapel. 51 1
I Washtenaw, Wed,, Nov. 19, Student-led
DevotIon, 10:00 p.m., Communion, The
Rev. A. Scheips, Officiant.

INTIMATE APPAREL-STREET FLOOR

I-

p-

12.

11

,.
s"

TOD

Y

r

ED SCHOOL WORKSHOPS
* The demands of the Black Caucus for 20% Black student
enrollment in the school.
* The immediate formation of a STUDENT-FACULTY
assembly with the functions of:
1, Recommending to the governing faculty the final
reorganization plan for the school.
2. Incorporating the concept of mutual accountability of
students and professors in both classrooms and
programs within the school.
3. Studying the potential of a Student-Faculty Assembly
in the final reorganization plan.
* The immediate appointment of an interim Associate Dean
in charge of research
* The development of experimental multiple teacher education
programs. Such programs to be developed by both
students and faculty in the school

L

Come and discuss these

issues and others

r

The Career Scene at NSA: As a mathematician at NSA, you will play an
active part in defining, formulating and solving communications-related prob-
lems, many of major national significance. Statistical mathematics, matrix
algebra, finite fields, probability, combinatorial analysis, programming and
symbolic logic are but a few of the tools applied by.Agency mathematicians.
Theoretical research is also a vital concern at NSA, owing to the fact that
the present state of knowledge in certain fields of mathematics is not suffi-
ciently advanced to satisfy NSA requirements.
Your Imagination, a Vital Factor: Because you will be working at and be-
yond the present-day state-of-the-art, your imagination will be stretched to
its limits. Mathematical problems will seldom be formulated and handed to
you. Instead you will help define the problem by observing its origin and
characteristics and the trends of data associated with it. You will then deter-
mine whether the problem and data are susceptible to mathematical treat-
ment, and if so, how.
Career Benefits: NSA's liberal graduate study program permits you to pursue
two semesters of full-time graduate study at full salary. Nearly all academic
costs are borne by NSA, whose proximity to seven universities is an addi-
tional asset.
Starting salaries, depending on education and experience, range from
$9,169.00 to $15,000.00, and increases will follow systematically as you
assume additional responsibility. Further, you will enjoy the varied career
benefits and other advantages of Federal employment without the necessity
of Civil Service certification.
Check with your Placement Office for further information about NSA. or write

9:00 A.M.
4200 Merhab, Weber, 0. Nelson
4009 J. McAdoo, Conrey, Lehsten
4001 Madlin, J. Brown, Agard
1430 Lippitt, Scholl, Bergmon
2431 M. McAdoo, Hutchcroft,
Allen
2432 Byrn, Pearl, Grambeau
2435 Bidwell, Friedman, Cave
2436 Hallahan, Eiber, Peterson
2022 Goodman, Barritt, Morich
2016 Blackburn, Lowther,
Carpenter
3014 Ring, Larson

12:00
4200
4009
4001
2431
2432
2435
2022

1:00 P.M.

4200
4009
4001
2431

Massialas, Coxford, Loving
Collet, Dixon, Eggertson
Grede, Rigan, Hunsicker
Moore, Schwertfeger,

O. Nelson, Favreau
Weiss, Bennett
Grede, Angus
A. Glenn
Sitko, Cooper
Judson
Penix

10:00 A.M.
4200 Spinazola, Weber,
1. Anderson
4009 J. McAdoo, Conrey, Hughes
4001 Medlin, J. Brown, Helms,
Agard
1430 Starks, Hodges, Bergman
2431 H. McAdoo, Dimond, S. Allen
2432 Byrn, Scobie, Grambeau
2435 Price, Judson, Marich
2436 Hallahan, Eibler, Bennett
2022 Peterson, Angus, Ring
?nm , Rlnkir n Cnv

Walter
2432 Scobie, Inwood, Walker
2435 Johnson, Dunning, Keen
2016 Angus, Wingo, Jacobson
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2:00 P.M.

4200
4009
4001
1430
2431

Mossilas, Coxford, Foss
Wingo, McCluskey, Dixon
Penix, Rigan, Hunsicker
Hutchcroft, Jenson, Hodges
Schwertfeger, Walter

II

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