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November 16, 1969 - Image 6

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 16, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 16, 1969

1' REVAMPS PROGRAM

I

I V S
International Voluntary Services, Inc
opportunities overseas in-
" education
" agriculture
* community development
SEE RECRUITERS
Tuesday, November 18

'Poverty law'

courses expand

WALL-TO-WALL BODIES:
Harts open home to
D.C. war protesters

8:30 A.M.-5 P.M.

3516 SAB

NED'S BOOKSTORE
YPSILANTI
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.

By TAMMY JACOBS
and JIM NEUBACHER
The Law School's only for-
mal course in the field of pov-
erty law has been dropped -
but there are more opportuni-
ties than ever for law students
interested in working with the
poor.
Legal problems of the Poor, a
course offered on a temporary
basis for the past two years,
was dropped this semester. How-
ever most of the information
taught in that course is still be-
ing presented as part of the
subject matter of other cours-
es, says L a w Prof. Terrance
Sandalow, chairman of the
school's curriculum committee.
The course, which was taught
by five profesors, included see-
tions on welfare, consumer cred-
it problems, landlord - tenant
problems, procedural problems
in test litigation, and general
problems of providing good le-
gal services to the poor.
' "Each part should have been
a course in itself," says Prof.
David Chambers. "It was drop-
ped for just the right reason -
to expand."
However, many law students,
while admitting that the school
is attempting to expand its pro-

grams in the area of poverty
law, are not satisfied.
"They're making efforts, but
the offerings a r e still inade-
quate," says Judy Munger, sec-
retary of the Law Club Board
of Directors, the school's stu-
dent government.
Mary Bery, a member of the
Black L a w Students Alliance,
says the "b i g problem is re-
forming the whole curriculum
so that there are more alterna-
tives available for students in-
terested in community law."
However trying to develop a
number of specific, relevant
courses in the field of poverty
law has not been an easy job
for the school.
Prof. Joseph Sax, currently on
leave from the school and work-
ing for the Ford Foundation,
was one of the original backers
of a poverty law course. In a
telephone interview recently,
Sax said that Legal Problems of
the Poor had b e e n intended
from the start to exist only un-
til more specific courses could
replace it.
"Two years ago, we began,
along with Berkeley and Colum-
bia, this sort of 'slap-dash'
broad course," he explained. "At
that time there was a real lack

We
We

think we're interesting-
hope you will.

of persons qualified and avail-
able to teach such specific
courses, and a real lack of good
textual material."
"No one had even compiled a
case book of the relevant de-
cisions in the field," he added.
Despite the difficulties, Sax
said the course was satisfactory
at the time. "We were operating
with a real sense of urgency."
Sandalow agrees with Sax,
and adds that the original objec-
tive-to- offer a stopgap course
until better material could be
gathered - has been accom-
plished.
"Our offerings in the area of
poverty law have grown much
richer, and will continue to ex-
pand," he says.
Both the consumer credit and
welfare sections of the old course
have been expanded this year
into new individual courses. In
addition, aeffirst-year' property
course, offered consistently in
the past, now contains the in-
formation on landlord-tenant
problems.
The section on slum housing
is now dealt with in a seminar
on metropolitan area legal prob-
lems, and Sandalow is incor-
porating the section on test lit-
igation into his course The Fed-
eral Courts and t h e Federal
System.
Besides courses dealing di-
rectly with poverty law, several
courses which on their face ap-
pear not to be relevant to the
field include material on the
subject. T h e "corporations"
course, Sandalow says, has in-
creased its emphasis on small
businesses and is taking a look
at legal problems involved with
black capitalism.
Other courses, such as those
dealing with civil rights and
civil liberties, have been made'
increasingly relevant to the situ-
ation of the country's poor.
In addition to the formal
course offerings, there are a
number of special credit pro-
grams dealing with poverty law.
Last summer, for example,
Prof. James White sponsored
and supervised ten students who
I worked half time at the Wash-
tenaw County Legal Aid So-
ciety. The students earned four
hours credit.
Some law students have ful-
filled requirements in research
courses by working for Legal
Aid, while 100 others have work-
ed for the society counseling
persons who come in for serv-

ices. A special court order al-
lows students to try certain
kinds of cases for Legal Aid
clients, Sandalow notes.
He points out that "almost
everything we do in the training
of law students is relevant in
teaching them to represent the
poor. Many techniques are
equally important whether the
lawyer is representing a rich
corporation or a small ghetto
business."
Just how relevant the school's
offerings are is open to dispute.
"You can't even talk about rele-
vance unless you have the stu-
dents to take the course," says
Ed Fabre, chairman of BLSA's
communications committee. "A
major problem is the lackhof
black students in this law school
to take the courses and a lack
of black faculty members to
teach them."
Sandalow admits a major
problem still exists in getting
professors to teach poverty
courses. The law school turn-
over, which is always high, hit.
the poverty law program par-
ticularly hard this year.
The increasing demand for
poverty law courses at other
schools across the country may
make qualified personnel even
more scarce, but the Law School
plans to continue its expansion
in the field.
"I've s e e n a significant
change, one which will -n-
tinue." says Sax. "If you'd pro-
posed such a program for con-
centrating on the problems of
the poor in 1960, a lot of people
would have just laughed at you."
But times have changed, and he
says, "I think the law school
has been reasonably responsive
to the change."
Sociology untit
asks changes
(Continued from Page 2>
sponding concur that some re-
vision of course credits and re-
quirements is necessary. But
they are divided over specifically
what should be changed.
Reform will depend on how
the department's all-faculty ex-
ecutive committee will interpret
the poll whose results may be
considered by the executive
committee at a meeting t h is
Tuesday.

Jq A*m

'AW f

04
It'

By TAMMY JACOBS
"We had wall to wall bodies"
laughed Mrs. Janie Hart, wife.
of Michigan Senator P h illi p
Hart.
The Washington D.C. home of
the Harts has been invaded for
the last few days by students
participating in the moratorium
activities. As many as 39 stu-
dents at a time have slept in the
Hart house this week.
"It's a good place for them to
take shelter from the wind and
the cold," Senator Hart com-
mented, adding that he wasn't
worried at all about the many
strangers in his house.
"I don't think he's scared of
anything - that guy," com-
mented a coed from Chicago, a
friend of a friend of the Harts'
daughter.
Senator Hart spent most of
yesterday downtown. "I march-
ed from about 11th St. to the
Washington Monument," he
said.
He added the demonstration
was "wonderful", but express-
ed regret at the "ruckus" late
last night, "although it was just
caused by a tiny handful."
"It's all very casual," ex-
plained University student Janis
Braun. "People walk in and out
of the door and just mill
around."
The Hart's have a roster in
the front hall that keeps track
of who is visiting and records
guests messages. As each stu-
dent leaves he crosses off his
name.
"They have been filing out
as they have found some form
of transportation," Mrs. Hart
explained, saying that Friday
night was busiest. "But we're
getting eight more tonight,
friends of one of the students
who are here from Boston."
Mattresses covered the flpors
of most of the house, and stu-
dents sprawl on the floors in
sleeping bags or wrapped in
blankets. "We turn over our
bedrooms to them." Mrs. Hart
said, "and the boys kind of
shift in and out." But she add-
ed their two youngest children
and her daughter Ann have re-
tained their own rooms.
"Ann has been doing a won-
derful job. She ran the place
while I was away." Mrs. Hart
was in Ann Arbor part of Thurs-
day and Friday.

"The Harts have been really
fantastic to all of us," Miss
Braun said.
"I'd rank the accommoda-
tions somewhere between the
Sheraton and the Hilton," joked
Wilson.
Its been delightful," Senator
Hart said. "I wish it would hap-
pen every night."
' Yipies, police
clash in streets
(Continued from Page 1)
downtown area. However the large
contingents of police and troops
in the area had not been removed
from duty, they said.
Yippie and SDS leaders called
a protest rally for 10 p.m. last
night in DuPont Circle, scene of
Friday's violent action, to plan
retaliatory action. The rally drew
only a small number of persons,
however, and fizzled.
Many of the anti-war demon-
strators, some who have been in
the city since Wednesday, began
leaving tonight, and police officials
said they expected the situation
to remain quiet.
Five policemen were reported to
have suffered minor injuries, at
least two of them felled by tear
gas inhalation. Police said 97 dem-
onstrators were treated at local
hospitals.
Assembly to
jaet on ROT
RC TC
Continued from Page 3)
Campus", not just this Univer-
sity, says Rieke.
The most important aspect of
the resolution, said Payne, is that
it gives the faculty an option
on whether to participate.
Students supported a bookstore
referendum in the Staudent Gov-
ernment Council elections 1 a s t
week by a 10 to 1 majority. This
institutes a rolling assessment of
$5 per student upon the student's
entrance to the University, and
can be returned upon his request
when he leaves, provided the store
it solvent. Students already en-
rolled will be assessed for the first
time this September along with
incoming freshmen.

Is YOUR Car Safe
To Drive Home Thanksgiving 1
Have us check your transmission

i

SWe'll Keep You
in Stit ches"
By Travis Cash
The recipe for a good speech includes some shortening.
First busrnessman: 'Is y our adverising getting results?"
Second businessman: "It sure is. Monday we advertised for a
night watchman, and that very night we were robbed!"
A "I
Friend: a person who goes around saying nice things about
you behind Four back.
A synonym is a word you use when you can't spell the other
one.
Traffic light: a device that helps.you get halfwav across the
street safely.
Speaking of safety, you're always safe in trusting us for the
greatest clothing values availablc.

ASHLEY
Auto Service

10% to
students with I.D.
507 S. ASHLEY

( -r.
J-_i

There's that
something sexier
about a man with
that Swinging Swash-
the cMustache!

} ^ V
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And we've got the sexiest looking mustaches.
Totally real! Several styles and colors. Instant
transformation brings Mustache Power to
your modest mate! Every man wants that
something sexier look - of a mustache!
by BLACK WATCH $7.95

DR. EMIL LEFFLER I

AZ2L,-
.. r

will interview liberal arts graduate stu-
dents for the 146 colleges, universities,
schools of theology, and other schools of
The United Methodist Church.

FIGHT SUNDAY NIGHT BLAHS
with
MIXER

419 Detroit
At Kingsley
(N, of Huron
Ann Arbor

t l ,
i Iti
l
^ft
'OS

Phone
663-2008

We featore gently used clothing from gracious hones
Open Friday evenings 'til 9

.("et a8t iorth Ut et nnA~' .
b . r ae 1b7.011.

Call for appointments.
Placement Office
Wednesday & Thursday. November 19 & 20
THE UNIVERSITY OF

Nov. 16-8 P.M.

Food, Music

1429 Hill

i

.
,
;-.
' ,
'" _
9 N
y ,fir ,

MICHIGAN
Ann Arbor
RING DAY
November 19
9:00-4:00
at FOLLETT'S
- - - - - - - - - --'

HOW MUCH FREEDOM CAN YOU HANDLE?
WE'RE A SMALL NORTH COUNTRY COLLEGE FAMILY
DOING WHAT WE KNOW WE HAVE TO DO. NO ONE
TELLS US WHAT OR HOW OR WHEN. WE PLAN OUR OWN
EDUCATION, CREATE OUR OWN LIFE, STYLES, DEFINE OUR
OWN WORLD VIEWS. THERE'S A LOT OF RESPONSIBILITY,
A LOT OF WORK, A LOT OF SHARING, AND A LOT OF
GROWING.

If you think you could fit,
maybe you should talk with us.

I

i "COMIk
jotiece

FOLLETT'S BOOKSTORE
322 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan 481041
SERVING THE THIRD GENERATION OF AMERICA'S COLLEGE STUDENTS

For
MARK

information contact:
A. CHAIN, Admissions

Franconia, New Hampshire
03580

- - -_______________ ___-_-_-__ ______-__- __. ___ I

The Henry Martin Loud Lectureship
PRESENTS

T,

SISTER ANN IDA GANNON
President of Mundelein College
SPEAKING ON
A New Faith for a New Culture
SUNDAY, 7:00 P.M. at
WESLEY FOUNDATION LOUNGE

1~

11 l4 N t ' ^ A t D-l,, 40 !Mr R ?1 fCt1l

I

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