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November 14, 1969 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-14

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 14, 1969

P age Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, November 14, 1969

DISCUSS REFORMS

Ed School plans class workshops

Workshops, rallies
mark local activity

By SHARON WEINER
Instead of going to class next
Tuesday, most students and fac-
ulty in the education school will
attend "class-seminars" to dis-
cuss innovation and reorgani-
zational proposals.
These proposals, an out-
growth of a student-faculty re-
treat at Waldenwoods 1 a s t
weekend, were approved "in
principle" by the school's execu-
tive committee Nov. 11, and will
be considered by the faculty at
a special meeting next Tuesday.
The proposals include:

-a demand for 20 per cent
black enrollment in the school
at both graduate and under-
graduate levels and 20 per cent
black faculty;
-the immediate formation of
an ad hoc student-faculty as-
sembly to oversee structural
and curricular reform;
-the immediate appointment
of an interim associate dean in
charge of research; and
-the development of experi-
mental multiple-option teacher
education programs.
"These workshops are partial-

Doves discuss policy

(Continued from Page 3)
And with the departure of each
planeload of our troops, Amer-
ican's ability to bring about poli-
tical accommodation will dimish."
A few minutes later, debatingE
the question with Sen. Robert J:
Dole (R-Kan), Gore asserted that
in the speech "the President re-
treated from the constructive pro-
posals for a political settlement
which he advanced in his speech
of May 14."
The Tennessee Democrat said
that United States should let
Hanoi know "that we are willing
to compromise and to use our in-
fluence to seek compromise with
respect to the character of gov-
ernment in Saigon.
"That is the central issue. In-
deed, that is what the war is
about. Unless we are willing to

compromise that central issue,
then we really have not offered
a basis for political compromise
and negotiation."
Three days later, Sen. Edmund
S. Muskie of Maine, the 1 9 6 8
Democratic vice presidential nom-
inee, criticized Nixon, saying
"There was not one word of in-
centive for the South Vietnamese
to accelerate the strengthening of
their forces or to make political
efforts to end the war."
And he presented an analysis of
the letter exchange between Nix-
on and the late North Vietnamese
President Ho Chi Minh, saying
Ho's letter offered the possibility
of a U.S. initiative w h i c h the
President ignored.
"I do not think we are going
to end the war," the Maine Demo-
crat said, "unless we do something
about the political questions."

ly informational-we want stu-
dents and faculty to know and
understand the proposals which
will be acted upon Tuesday af-
ternoon," explains Jack Eisner,
president of Students for Edu-
cational Innovation (SEI).
The seminars are primarily
designed to involve the students
up to the point where they feel
they have a commitment to the
school, he says. "We also hope
to gain some faculty support
for the proposals through these
60 or 70 workshops."
A schedule of Tuesday's ac-
tivities will be circulated and,
according to 'Eisner, the work-
shops will be held with the fac-
ulty in their regularly sched-
uled classrooms when possible.
"Classes aren't cancelled of-
fically, but we think most of the
faculty are participating," - he
says.
Madeline Campbell, a member
of SEI, says, "Students are often
apathetic because they feel
nothing they do carries weight.
These sessions should convince
them otherwise."
Education Dean Wilbur Cohen
will be attending various work-
shops Tuesday. "There may be
good ideas coming out of the
day's discussions," he says.
"I wouldn't like to predict
what will happen at the faculty
meeting," he adds.
The proposal asking a mini-
mum 20 per cent 'black enroll-
ment for the school was intro-
duced by a "black caucus" rep-
resenting black students and
faculty in the school. The execu-
tive committee has recommend-

ed that Prof. Alvin Loving, one
of its members, be appointed to
a committee which would work{
to implement the black de-
mands.
The ad hoc student-faculty
assembly would work to reform
the teacher training program
and reorganize the departmental
structure of the school.
"The assembly is a way to
get a larger degree of both stu-
dent and faculty input into the
,Achool's decision - making ma-
chine," explains Eisner.
"We'd like to build an ad-
ministrative structure around
the classroom so it would be
responsive to the students'
needs," he adds.
The third proposal asks for
appointment of an interim dean
in charge of research to de-
velop policies for the handling
of present and future research
and training proposals in the
school.
The proposal also asks for the
development of an "institutional
evaluation unit" to scrutinize
education school projects and
help with the development of
experimental instructional pro-
grams.
Suggest Cohen
for state post
State Rep. George F. Mont-
gomery (D-Detroit), suggested
Gov. William Milliken should
either name Dean Wilbur Cohen
of the Education School to fill
the vacancy on the State Board
of Education or leave the seat
empty.
Montgomery said "perhaps the
most fitting tribute which the
state could give in memory of
the service which Dr. Leroy
Augenstein has provided would
be to retire his seat on the
State Board of Ednca'tion."
Augenstein was killed early
last Saturday when his airplane
crashed.
When informed Montgomery's
suggestion last night, Cohen
said "no comment,"

(Continued from Page 1)
underground paper, took the mi-
crophone next. He opened by dis-
counting the "myth" that all GIs
are against the peace movement,
"We can't believe that Vietnam is
worth devoting our lives to. We
can't believe that it is worth los-

the government planted agents,
provacateurs, in the crowds in
Chicago. Action like this is some-
thing to think about."R
Just as Joyce was about to
speak, a woman came down from
the courtrooms, which are on the
sixth floor of the City Hall, and
asked if the rally could move.
"There's a contention trial (re-
sulting from the LSA sit-in) going
on and the defense attorney is
concerned that the rally is pre-
judicing the jury," she reported.
Upon hearing this, Graysonj
grabbed the mike and told t h e
crowd that the trial was all the
Prof. William C. Rhodes, pro-
ject director for psychology of the
University's Institute for the Study
of Mental Retardation, will speak
3 at the Second Annual Conference

"We sold all the bus tickets a
few days ago," said New Mobe or-
ganizer Jim Schreier. "As it
stands now everyone looking for
a ride is getting one," he said.
Schreier estimated that 7,000
people from Ann Arbor were go-
ing to Washington.

more reason for the people to be
there and that, "some of us should
go up there and sit in on it."
About a dozen people did go
up to the courtrooms, but were
talked out of going in by the law-
yers and defendents.

ing our lives for." The New Mobe office in the
Student Activities Building was
Frank Joyce, of the Chicago con- the scene of constant activity yes-
spiracy defense staff, gave t h e terday. People looking for rides
background of the trial and spoke and rides looking for people had
of conspiracy by the government, to be put together along with all
specifically the CIA. the details of buses and rented
"It seems quite clear now that cars.

Apollo 12 gets okay
for moon shot today
(Continued from Page1)
If all goes well, Conrad, Gordon and Bean will first thunder into
a circular earth orbit 118 miles high, then reignite the upper stage of
their Saturn 5 rocket after 1% circuits of the globe to kick them out
of orbit toward the moon.
With the lunar-landing craft they call "Intrepid" hooked to the
nose of the command ship named "Yankee Clipper," the three as-
tronauts are to swing into moon orbit Monday at 10:57 p.m.
Late the next day, Conrad, 39-year-old veteran of two Gemini
flights, and Bean, 37-year-old rookie astronaut, are to crawl into In-
trepid and land on the eastern "shore" of the Ocean of Storms Wed-
nesday at 1:53 a.m. Gemini veteran Gordon, 40, is to remain in moon
orbit taking care of the Apollo 12 command ship.
Apollo 12's planned landing site is within walking distance of the
unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft which landed 150 feet down the slope
of a lunar crater 2% years ago. Conrad and Bean hope to ease down
the 15-degree slope, snip off pieces of the Surveyor and return them to
earth so engineers designing moon bases can learn how materials wear
on the moon.
"I think we're starting what we've really been shooting for -- and
that's to explore the moon," Conrad observed.

THE HOUSE Invites the Community to
Participate in a
"PEACE SHABBAT"
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14-1429 Hill St.
CREATIVE/REFORM SERVICES BEGINNING AT 8:30 P.M.

on r oessionaiU ractice in To
ronto this weekend (Nov. 13-15). MARCH TO DIAG AT 9:00 P.M. CONCLUSION OF SERV-
The conference, sponsored by ICES AT THE DIAG.
the Lions clubs of District A-7,
will deal with the treatment and ALL THOSE NOT GOING TO WASHINGTON, D.C., FOR THE MOBILIZA-
education of emotionally disturbed TION ARE URGED TO PARTICIPATE IN A MOST UNIQUE AND REWARD-
children. Dr. Rhodes will speak
on "Alternative Models in the Ed- ING JEWISH EXPERIENCE.
ucation of the Emotionally Dis-
turbed Child."
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-Associated Press
The 'March Against Death' passes the White House

'March Against Death'
proceeds peacefully

*4fZ.
DI

-
~~.f
--

(Continued from Page 1)
at 6 p.n. following a short cere-
mony at the west entrance of
Arlington Memorial Bridge.
Among the first marchers was
Dr. Benjamin Spock, the anti-
war leader who recently had his
conviction for conspiracy to aid
draft-dodgers overturned.
Dr. Spock told newsmen he con-
sidered the n nnerical response
to administrative warnings of
violence "one of the few encour-
aging things" about the present
anti-war outlook.
"Instead of being scared away
the marchers have been alerted,
challenged, to come here," he said,
Meanwhile, New Mobe officials
indica tfd yesterday that several
problems complicating the three
days of anti-war activities had
been solved while others had be-
come more acute,
The housing iproblem, f o r
examlle, appears to have worsen-
ccl since Wednesday.
According to members of the
New Mobe housing staff onlyf
11.000 of the expected 45,000 par-
ticipants in the March Against:
Death will be provided with lodg-
Ing during their stay in Washing-
toi.
The decrease in accommnoda-

tions has been attributed in part,
to gross over estimates in the
amount of spaces available in sevx-
eral colleges in the Washington
area-particularly George Wash-
ington University and American
University.
In addition, housing spaces
which had been reserved for sex-
eral out-of-town delegations- in-
eluding the contingent from the
University-will be unavailable,
Gene Gladstone, Michigan co-
Drdinator of New Mobe, arrived
here yesterday and discovered that
the spaces reserved at George
Washington University for the
Michigan delegation had been of-
fered to all participants on a first
come, first served basis.
Although unavailable for com-
ment yesterday, Gladstone was re-
portedly attempting to make ar-
rangement for housing at George-
town University.
Efforts to provide sanitation
facilities for the half-million peo-
pie expected to participate in to-
morrow's mass march were more
successful.
Although New Mobe was unable
to persuade the National Park
service to provide the 600 portable
toilets they said were needed, they
were able to come up with enough
money to rent the facilities.

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