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November 14, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-14

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NEWS -0532I

If your prevailing circumstances are
not extraordinarily conducive to
exemplary contentment with your
personal appearance there is a
reasonable probability that you
should contemplate a transferance
of patronage to our facilities.
I NTERNATIONAL/HAIRSTYLISTS

Sell
a
POT
in Daily
Classifieds

Friday, November 14, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Threc

Senate doves discuss postwar

WASHINGTON JP' - The Senate's
doves, recognizing President Nixon's com-
mitment to a substantial if not total U.S.
withdrawal from Vietnam, are turning
their attention to the question of South
Vietnam's postwar political structure,
Basically, as Sen. Albert G o r e, (D-
Tenn.), and others put it last week, they
fear the Nixon administration is doing
little to assure a broad-based, democratic
government able to maintain itself once
the half-million U.S. force is substantial-
ly withdrawn.
In part, this concern is political: a de-

sire to find a new focus for criticism in
view of Nixon's simultaneous embrace of
the need to withdraw and his rejection
of any speedy, total pullout. But, at the
same time, it focuses on what many con-
sider to be the fundamental question in.
volved in Vietnam: Who is to g o v e r n
South Vietnam and what kind of govern-
ment will that be?
Despite the emphasis by many of the
antiwar groups on speeding U.S. with-
drawal from Vietnam, political leaders are
stressing the more complex yet crucial po-
litical question. This always has been at

the heart of the criticism of U.S. Vietnam
policy by such figures as Sens. Eugene J.
McCarthy, Mike Mansfield, the late Rob-
ert F. Kennedy and others.
More than ever before, comments this
week in both House a n d Senate con-
centrated on this point.
While in part this represents a response
to Nixon's Nov. 3 speech, it points to the
long-run shape of the Vietnam issue as
more and more U.S. troops leave.
While it does not indicate war critics
intend to accuse Nixon of losing the war
if South Vietnam collapses in the years

Vietnamr
ahead, it does foresee a time when the
outcome of the political arangem t>s
made by the administrations becomnes
the focus of Vietnam debate in this
country.
Gore, in a speech Tuesday said: "It the
President has decided to bring about the
complete and one-sided Withdrawal of
U.S. forces without laying the foundation
for a compromise political settlement,,, ,e
will be inviting the death knell of demo-
cratic processes in South Vietnam and a
bloodbath of vast ptoport ions.
See DOVES, Page 8

- - - - - - -

The School of Music and Department of Art

in English!

November 21, 22, 24, and 25
8:00 P.M.
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
All Tickets $3.00
Information 764-61 18
Mail orders accepted. Make checks payable to
the University of Michioan. Send self-addressed,
stamped envelope to School of Music Opera.
Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48104. Box Office opens Monday, November
' 7 12:30-5:00 P.M

SENATORS ALIGN

the
news today
/ Thr "X A ocia1ed i' e Old College Press Service

Haynsworth debate nears

C TNIBUIRYTiiUgE
JOHN FAHEY
-He is one America's finest guitarists; does blues and traditional
melodies; some are made modern. Author and composer of the
revised "Bicycle Built for Two." And others. And a guy comes up
to me everyday and asks if I want to buy them rubber ducks I say
'No.' He says 'Why?' I say 'Because.' He says 'Because Why?' I
say 'Because I said so that's why!'
TONIGHT: $2.00; Doors open at 8. People-yummies
- - - -

PRIME MINISTER INDIRA GANDHI, bolstered by a show
of support within her divided Congress party, manuvered to keep
her majority in India's Parliament.
After her expulsion from the ruling Congress party by old guard
leaders, Mrs. Gandhi won a vote of confidence from about 300 of the
429 Congress members.
At a special party caucus. the Congress members adopted a reso-
lution declaring "invalid and unjustified" Mrs. Gandhi's expulsionl
Wednesday. But she lost the support of some important party figures,
including Labor Minister Jaisukhal Hathi.
A IIIG-LEVEL PURGE of liberals in Czechoslovakia's se-
curity forces was revealed.
The official Communist Party weekly Zivot Strany said the purge'
was carried out during the past few weeks, but did not give any names,
Ousted were "the best known representatives of right-wing op-
portunism in some functions of the security apparatus, and organiz-
ers of illegal nationalistic and anti-Soviet actions in 1968."
Those purged were active supporters of reformer Alexander Dub-
cek - especially security officials who helped in passive resistance af-
ter the Soviet-led invasion in 1968.
THE AMERICAN DELEGATION to the Paris peace talks
minimized citizen support for the anti-war moratorium.
U.S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge warned the North Vietna-
mese and the Viet Cong against relying on "false expectations about,
events in the United States''
Lodge cited a resolution signed by 301 congressmen as evidence
of American support for Nixon's policy.
Meanwhile North Vietnamese Ambassador Xuan Thuy said that
Nixon's position statement Nov. 3 "has aroused a strong wave of
protest in American. public opinion" and that "the American people
will oppose with increasing vigor the Nixon administration's policy of
aggression."
SECRETARY OF STATE WILLIAM ROGERS declared that
the U.S. has three objectives for a "balance strategy of security"
in entering strategic arms control talks with the Soviet Union.
The first objective, he said in a speech yesterday, is to enhance
international security by maintaining a stable U.S.-Soviet strategic
relationship through limitations on the deployment of strategic arms.
The second is to halt the upward spiral of strategic arms and
avoid the tensions, uncertainties, and costs of an unrestrained con-
tinuation of the arms race.-
The third objective, he said. is to reduce the risk of an outbreak :
of nuclear war through a dialogue about issues arising from the stra-
tegic situation.
A PENTAGON OFFICIAL has urged the development of a
synthetic biological warfare agent against which t h e r e is no
k nown defense.
The development should be taken to avoid "technological sur-
prise" by an enemy and to learn if defensive measures can be devised,'
Dr. D. M. MacArthur, deputy defense director for research and tech-I
nology said in congressional testimony.E
MacArthur gave no details on the biological agent except to say;
victims could not build up immunity to the synthetic agent as they1
can to natural biological warfare weapons.
He added that the development of a new type of germ warfare
weapon could lead to an end to controversial stockpiling of poisonous
weapons, possibly in the next decade.
THE FBI charged three men and two women with conspir-
acy in a four month series of bombings in New York City.
Anonymous letters to news media said the bombings were attacksI
against American big business, the government, and the military.
The arrests followed an attempt by two of the men to place ex-
plosives Wednesday night in U.S. Army trucks outside a National;
Guard Armory.

Pearsoi Symington
CHICAGO 8 TRIAL:
Hoffmnan rescimds
order to jalnu bill

CHICAGO
J. Hoffman
his order to

(A Judge Julius grant the motion but he added:
rescinded yesterday "I must caution all the defend-
jail Jerry C. Rubin ants that I expect them to attend

WASHINGTON ,P, - - Two
more senators quit the thin-
ning ranks of the undecided
yesterday, one coming out for
t h e Supreme Court nomina-
tion of Clement F. Hayns-
worth Jr. a n d the othe:'
against.
Sen. James P. Pearson tR-Kan.
said he will back President Nix-
on's nominee although "I do ,o
with some concern."
Sen. Stuart Symington ti-Mo.
said he will vote against becaustf
"the feeling of hostility and frus
tration weih this nominat ion ha
evoked could only be exacerbate(
by honoring a jmist who does no
have the highest sense of ethical
considerations."
The declarations cane as I L
Senate moved toward opening iii
the formal debate on the nomina-
tion made by President Nixon las.
August. Haynsworth currently is
chief judge of the 4th U.S. Cir
cuit Court at Richmond.
The debate was scheduled to be
gin around noon but was delayed
by Nixon's surprise visit to Cap-
itol Hill.
The President gave an eight-
minute speech in the Senate
chinber'.
Although Nixon made no men-
hion of the impending debate ini
his speech, there were signs it a.
on his mind.
Twice he told the 70 or so sen -
ators present that he respects
their right to vote as individuals.
According to an Associated
Press tally, t h e declarations of
Pearson and Symington leave 23
senators who have not definitely
committed themselves one way or
the otheri. The AP count shows 40
vho have definitely committed
themselves against confirmation
and 37 who say they will vote for
confirmation.
Pearson told the Senate that
despite charges of indiscretion and
bad judgment leveled against the
nominee, there is in the end onu
basic question "Is the nomine'
an honest man;"
' "Although I know him o n 1
front he cold patge of the record
of the hearings, the expressions o
the committee report and the
evaluations of those who do know
him, I cannot judge him to be dis
honest," Pearson said.
'The Michigan Daily, edited and man
ma-aged by students at the University oV
Mihigan. News phone: 74-0552. Seondt
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
',igan. 4':0 Maynard St., Ann Arbi
Mlehhgan 98104. Published daily 'tus-
day' through Sunday morning Univer-
sityv year. Su1bserition rates: $10o
c'arrier, l$0 by' mail,
Summer Sessmon publshed Tuedchy
through Saturday morning. Suhbrip
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $300 Lb
il
fi's
Th i KOBOB
8:sO

for leaving U.S. District Court
during his trial Wednesday.
Rubin, one of seven persons on
trial on charges of conspiring to
incite rioting during the De m o-
cratic National Convention, spent
the night in Cook County Jail af-
ter his bond was terminated.
He left the courtroom Wednes-
day afternoon to fly to New
Brunswick, N.J., for a speaking
engagement. He left with his law-
yer a written waiver of his right
to b' present in court, but t h e
judge ruled that an oral appli-
cation to be absent from the
courtroom should have been made.
William M. Kunstler, a defense
lawyer, argued that Rubin was ab-
sent only 26 minutes and that he
surrendered to U.S. marshals on
learning at O'Hare International
Airport that an arrest warrant
had been issued for him.
The lawyer said Rubin's absence
was a "mistake and misunder-
standing on our part."
Judge Hoffman said he would

every session. I'm not conducting
a Lyceum Circuit."
His remark about Lyceum Cir-
cuit, an old theater chain,as -
leased to Kunstler's explanation
that Rubin and other defendants
wxere required to make speaking
engagements to raise funds for
their defense.
Judge Hoffman also told the de-
fendants that he may consider
modifying his April 10 order
which permits the defendants to
travel within the United States.
The morning session -w'as de-
voted to arguments on subpoenas
issued by the defense to Chicago
government officials. The defense
has subpoenaed records from the
office of Mayor Richard J. Dal-
ey, the police department, the
streets and sanitation deaprtment
and the Chicago Park District.
Lawyers for the city asked that
the subjoenas be quashed or modi-
fied because they are not specific
in their demands for printed'
'material.

Starling today
lg

-.MI-pGA

SHOWS AT
1 :00-3:40-6:20-9:00

0

c~o 0
to be
crazy.

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THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB

proudly presents its director

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NEXT SEMESTER:
FILMS OF THE 60's

The IYIIDwolviIII
of CLI&IILLOT
The~ 11oi W)l~lU ltr('d(esignedC{to

SCEPTICS, GET A'HOLD OF THIS!

JAN. 9-11
16-18
23-25
30-FEB. 1

HARD DAY'S NIGHT
THE GOOD, THE BAD,
HUD
SHAME

AND THE UGLY

saveC the \\'orld fromi sanity
[G ,rSUGGESTED FO}R GENERALAUIEN;CES1
V. 'dO R OW . \ O~ -.'v A CY IANOAIJ-BRYAN FORBES P0Cj1O
kA; ! API~gLS-i PI PM . THE rL'nwflMA0N OF lRAI flT" ,HV pn. ;spE

MR. WILLIS PATTERSON
JOINT CONCERTS

I bra
oom *! f y .

FEB. 6-8
13-15

THE MISFITS
YELLOW SUBMARINE

II

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