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November 12, 1969 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-12

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 12, 1969

WHISTLE STOP EMPLOYES

Ed school

Y

Police i
By TIM BRANDYBERRY
The Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment announced yesterday that it
has shut off a major source of
supply for the local marijuana
market with the arrest of two
employes of the Whistle S t o p
Restaurant on South Forest.
Eugene A. Waxman, 25, man-
ager of the restaurant and Jeri L.
Hess were arrested along w it h
seven others in a raid Monday af-
Pentagon
inored
on ROTC'
(Continued from Page 1)
insisted the Navy would not con-
tinue its program if academic
credit is eliminated.
With Assembly's passage of the
report fairly assured, the next
question at this point is what the
reaction of the Regents to the re-
port will be. The Regents must
approve any decision to change
ROTC status.
Several Regents have indicated
previously they oppose changing
ROTC's status. Four Regents con-
tacted yesterday, however, de-
lined comment.
"I wouldn't want to second guess
the Regents," Payne says. "It's
a politically sensitive issue-it's
hard to say how they will react.
I said before and I still feel that
the entire University community
should get behind and support the
report. The demands are reason-
able."
The Regents will be meeting
with students and faculty on
Thursday, Nov. 20 to discuss the'
issue.
DAILY OFFICIAL'
BULLETIN
I +
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Day Calendar
Anatomy Seminar: Prof. Richard J.
Blandau, Univ. of Wash. Med. School,
Gamete Transport in the Fallopian
'ube"; North Lec. Hall, Med. Sc. TI,
1:00 p.m.
Mental Health Seminar: Prof. Rich-
ard L. Sidman, Dept. of Neuropathol-
ogy, Harvard Med. School, "Genetic
Analysis of Mammalian Developments";
1057 Mental Health Res. Inst., 3:45
p.m'
Near Eastern and North African
Studies Seminar: John K. Cooley,
Middle East Correspondent, The
Christian Science Monitor. "N e w
Actors in the Middle East Crisis"; 200
Lane. 4:00 p.m.
Physics Colloquium: J. Weber, Univ.
of Maryland, "Gravitational Radiation
Room, 4:00
Experiments"; P & A Colloquium Rm,
4:00 p.m.
Department of ,Journalism Illustrat-
ed Lecture: Barney Rosset, Publisher,
Grove Press, "The Case Against Censor-

nake major drug arrests reforms

SGC ELECTION RESULTS

ternoon and charged with selling ' ier's counter and then go pick
marijuana. Their bond was set j it up.
at $15,000 each. A former manager of the Whis-
Police Chief Walter Krasny said I tle Stop, who asked to remain
that the other seven had been| anonymous to avoid possibly har-
released pending investigation. He: rassment, said that the police ver-
said that if there are prosecutions, sion of the story sounded "fishy."
they would be charged with First, he said, "ther3 was no
either possession of marijuana or dope in the place at the time and
conspiracy to sell, which carries, there hadn't been for weeks be-
a stiffer penalty.

fore the arrest, so they can't claim
to have found any inside.;
"It would have been very easy
for the police to have made up the
whole thing, because no one has
seen the dope that the narc was
supposed to pick up. It's just their
word that these people made a
deal with the narc to sell him
dope," he said.

Krasny said that the restaur-
ant, which had been under close
surveillance for some time, "a
major narcotics outlet for the
area."-
According to witnesses, a man
named Gerald Lee Boulder, who
had been hanging around t h e
Whistle Stop for several w e e k s
trying to buy and sell drugs, walk-
ed in Monday and handed t h e
cashier money.
As the cashier took the money,
Boulder pointed & gun at him and
told him he was under arrest. At
that moment four state police-
men entered and arrested every-
one on the premises, including the
customers.
Police also entered the h o u s e
where many of the Whistle Stop
employes live, searched it a n d
found a small bag of marijuana.
They then arrested several of the
occupants, including Miss Hess,
who was sleeping at the time of
the arrest.
Detective Richard Anderson of
the Ann Arbor Police Force s a i d
that the officers had a warrant
for Miss Hess's arrest. However,
at least one person arrested at the
house said that no one in the
house saw the warrant.
Police said that Miss Hess and
Waxman had made a deal with
Boulder a few days before the ar-
rest to sell him a certain quantity
of marijuana. The marijuana,
they said, was to be placed some-
where near the restaurant. Bould-
er was to pay for it at the cash-
ship": 'Aud. C. Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Department of Speech (Student Lab
Theater): A Slight Ache by Harold
Pinter: Arena Theater, Frieze, 4:10
p.m.
Voice Dept. Student Recital: School
of MusicsRecital Hall, 5:00 p.m.
Chemistry Colloquium: Dr. G. Vin-
cow. Univ. of Wash., "ESR Hyperfine
Splittings of Methyl Radicals"; 1300
Chem., 5:10 p.m.
Geography Seminar: Prof. Walter
Isard, Univ. of Pensylvania, "Time and
Space as Basic Primitives"; 4050 LSA,
5:15 p.m.
University Choir: Maynard K I e i n,
conductor: Hill Aud.. 8:00 p.m.
The Stanley Quartet: Gilbert Ross,
violin; Gustave Rosseels, violin; Ro-
bert Courte, viola; Jerome Jelinelt,
cello Rackham Lecture Hall, 8: 00 p m
Placement Ser-vice
Summer Placement Service: 212 SAB,
lower level.
Register for the following interviews
at Summer Placement:
Wednesday, November 12, Camp
Mataponi, Maine girls, from 10-3. Open-
ings for waterfront landsports, arts,
nature and camperaft.
Thursday, November 13: Camp Birch-
trails, Wisconsin, girls, from 10-5.
Openings in arts and crafts, gymnas-
ties, tripping, water balley, and ten-
nis.

Local Women's Liberation
forms discussion groups

endorsed
(Continued from Page 1)
the handling of present and future
research and training pr oposals
in the school.
In addition the proposal asks
for the development of an "in-
stitutional evaluation unit" to
scrutinize education school pr'o-
jects and help with the develop-
ment of experimental instructional
programs.
Prof. Joseph Payne, a member
of the executive committee, said
last night the faculty would "give
good support" to the proposals
recommended by the committee.
"There will be some discussion
on the black students demands,"
he said, "because there are some
objections to the quota system and
some problems involved in trying
to get that many black students
and faculty members."

9328 ballots were cast
Six candidates elected for
one year terms
FARRELL . 3966
ANDERSON 3290
SCOTT 2828
DeGRIECK 2715
NELSON 2541
BRAND 2359
Three candidates elected for
half year terms
MARTIN 2233
LEWIS .2035
WARRINGTON 1966
Not Elected

YES-8230

REFERENDUM 1: Shall a University bookstore with a student-
faculty policy board be established as follows: 1) The money to estab-
lish the store will come from $100,000 from the "Student Vehicle Fund"
and the remainder from a $5 returnable fee to be paid by all students;
2) The $5 deposit will be returned to each student on request .when he
leaves the University as long as the bookstore is solvent; 3) The deposit
will be levied in Sept., 1970 on all students currently enrolled. There-
after newly entering students will pay the deposit on entering. The
deposit will be collected through the normal University administered
method [or collecting student fees.

NO--833

REFERENDUM 2: Shall the student body have the authority to
determine when new student fees shall be added to tuition for construc-
tion of University facilities?

By JUDY KAHN
To say men and women must be
equal doesn't mean they must bej
identical. It simply means every-
one should be able to fulfill his-
or her-own potential.
This seems to be the consensus
of Ann Arbor Women's Liberation,
which held its first fall organiza-
tional meeting last night in theI
UGLI multipurpose room.
Miss Helen Epps, a member of
Women's Liberation, discussed the
many ways in which women are
being oppressed. For example, she
said women receive lower pay than
a man does for the same work,
and women generally need higher
qualifications to get a job.
Miss Epps added that house-
wives are a "slave labor force"
which is forced to work without
wages.
Women are legally discriminated
against through abortion, birth
control, prostitution, and other
laws, she continued.
Psychological oppression leads
women to think of themselves as
being inferior. Women are treated
primarily as sex objects, and they
are exploited as such, Miss Epps
said.
"Women judge other women
through men's minds. They are so
oppressed they believe in their
own oppression," she added.
Ann Arbor Women's Liberation
is a decentralized community-
wide group now in the process of
creating several small discussions
groups for women. Each group will
be autonomous, and will set its
own goals and establish its own
discussion topics.
Beth Schneider, a member of
Womens Liberation, said last night
she expects that different groups
will be composed of women with
ART AUCTION!
THURS. EVE., NOV. 13
at 8:30 P.M.
Presented by the
MERIDIAN GALLERY
of Cleveland
Featuring original works of
graphic art etchings, litho-
graphs, woodcuts - by lead-
ing 20th century artists

various political persuasions -
ranging from "moderately liberal
to radical."
Miss Schneider added that many
Women's Liberation members are
non-students and many are mar-
ried and have children.
About 60 people including sev-
eral men attended last night's
meeting.

Read
Dillon
Gilbert
Browh
Hack
Schenk
Hodax
Write-in

1812
1239
1189
1155
968
812
758
247

YES-6415

NO--2445

* * *

REFERENDUM 3: Should the'
all its armed forces from Vietnam?

United States immediately withdraw
NO--2438

Absained
Invalid Ballots

1803
56

YES-5979

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RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL
Directd by LUIS BUNUEL

HA Product of -S -
COLUMBIA, RECORDS

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realist imagery with leftist social protest."
-Life

"Throughout, Bunuel continues his career-
long attack on church and state.'
-Time

Luis Bunuel is often compared to Goya, another great Spanish artist, for they
both dealt in the horror and degradation of life and placed their dreadful

I

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