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November 12, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BILUES FESTI VAL
IS ECSTATICALLY ANNOUNCING
THAT YOUR BIG CHANCE HAS COME!
Petition for General Chairman
PETITIONS NOW READY,
2nd floor, Michigan Union Department QB -
7112IYR(BUt. OUSE
Presents
JOHN FAHEY
-Emerging from legend to defy your concepts
of guitar playing and stage presence-
THURSDAY *DTWONIGHTSONLY *" FRIDAY
Doors open 8 P.M. 665-0606 $2.00
Let the Music Flow Down Like Streams from the Mountain

three

T I P

ir ri ttn

I- I

NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

Wednesday, November 12, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Senate compromise clears

way

for

agreement

on

draft

lottery
- WASHINGTON (M - Presi-

the
n e ws oday
by TheL Associtebd Pressand CollegePrss Servtice

HALF

A

SIXPENCE

THE ,ARMY announced yesterday that soldiers who wear
their uniforms in this week's anti-war demonstrations in Wash-
ington will be arrested and face possible court martial.
A Sept. 12 directive from the Pentagon bans servicemen from
demonstrating in uniform and forbids them to engage in protests
"when violence is likely to result."
Because the Justice Dept. has said that violence is expected in
Washington some military authorities feel that they may also be
able to deal with servicemen who participate in civilian clothing.
The armed forces police detachment of the Military District of
Washington has been assigned to watch for violators of the rule,
who could incur maximum punishment of two years at hard labor
plus a dishonorable discharge.
HEAVY FIGHTING erupted near the Cambodian border as
North Vietnamese troops attacked an American artillery base
after a day-long battle with South Vietnamese mercenaries a mile
away.
The fighting centered near the town of Bo Due, 83 miles north
of Saigon, where up to two North Vietnamese regiments may be
massing. Field reports said the allies lost 15 men with 75 wounded
while 80 North Vietnamese were killed.
The U.S. artillery base, three miles from Bo Due, was hit for
the second time in four days, leaving at least five Americans killed and
five wounded.
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT decided not to appeal a court
decision that will hamper cutting off federal funds to racially
biased school districts.
A ruling by the New Orleans Apellate Court had objected to the
Department of HEW's policy that proof of discrimination in pupil
and faculty assignments is sufficient evidence that all programs con-
ducted by the school district are discriminatory.
The Department of HEW will now lhave the additional burden of
finding whether each school program receiving federal funds is in
violation of the law instead of basing cutoffs on discrimination in
one particular area.

Soph Show
TICKETS ON SALE NOW
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BOX OFFICE

-Associated Press
SEVERAL THOUSAND demonstrators proclaim their support for
President Nixon's Vietnam policies at a Veterans Day rally at the
Washington Monument. Police estimated the crowd at 7,500,
short of the 10,000 people hoped for by rally organizers.
Demonstrators bac k
Nixon Vietnam plan
WASHINGTON (/P) - Waving flags, banners, and placards, sev-
eral thousand persons turned out yesterday for a Veterans Day rally
at the Washington Monument to proclaim their support for President
Nixon's Vietnam policy and denounce its opponents.
"Let there be no mistake: the silent majority is no longer si-
lent," Lee Edwards, coordinator of the "Freedom Rally," shouted into
a microphone on the monument grounds.
National Park Police estimated the overwhelmingly white crowd
at 7,500, somewhat short of the 10,000 hoped for by the organizers.
Edwards, on the other hand, estimated 15,000 were present.
Earlier, about 3,000 persons climbed the long hill into Arlington
National Cemetery for the traditional laying of the presidential wreath
at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

dent Nixon's proposal f or a
draft lottery cleared its ma-
jor Senate obstacle yesterday
as advocates of broader draft
reform agreed to drop their
efforts this year in return for
a commitment to hearings
and possible legislation in
1970.
The agreement was reached at
an hour-long meeting in Demo-
cratic leader Mike Mansfield's of-
fice, opening the way for Senate
approval of the House-passed
measure, possibly before Thanks-
giving.
Sen. John C. Stennis (D-Miss),
chairman of the Senate Armed
Services Committee, told reporters
"I feel greatly encouraged that a
bill can move along and will pass
the Senate without amendments."
The House bill would repeal a
sentence in the 1967 Selective
Service Act that forbids use of a
lottery if 19-year-olds are drafted
first.
Stennis and Sen. Margaret
Chase Smith of Maine, the rank-
ing Republican on the Armed
Services Committee, both pledged
they would hold comprehensive
hearings next year with a view
toward reporting new draft legis-
lation to the Senate. The present
draft law expires June 30, 1971.
The Nixon administration had
said it would switch to the 19-
year-old draft next year and de-
clared it would use other, more
complex methods, if Congress did
not permit a lottery.
The aim of the changes is to
limit a young man's liability to one
year, either the period he is 19 or
the year after expiration of a col-
lege deferment.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of
Massachusetts, the assistant Dem-
ocratic leader anda key advocate
of broad draft reform, said Sten-
nis' pledge "gives me the kind of
assurances I would need to sup-
port the repeal and the institution
of a random selection system."
He also said Stennis' promise
on hearings and action "made a
strong impact" on those at the
meeting, including several other
senators who have sponsored draft
reform proposals.

Nov. 13
Nov. 14 and 15
Mendelssohn Theatr

8: 00 P-.M.

$2.25
$2.50

7:00 and 10:00 P.M.

IA(9

Michigan League

U

iIHEED'

THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION acknowledged
I it has failed to remove a single drug from the market in its two-
_ year campaign against ineffective drugs.
Court suits challenging government action and administrative
delays have blocked the removal of 175 of the 200 drugs which were
ordered to be phased out in January, 1968. An additional 25 little-
used and unprofitable drugs have been voluntarily removed by manu-
facturers.
. . .

no-MMNWA

Ann Arbor's Favorite Movie Has Been
HELD OVER AGAIN By Popular Demand
4th BIG WEEK
"Let us not mince words. It is the funniest movie I
have seen in ages and it had me screaming with
laughter. Go see it. It's a resounding winner."
-Stewart Klein, WNEW-TV
"A zoo of weird characters ... hilarious ... total
insanity ... provokes uncontrollable laughter."
-Neal Gabler, Mich. Daily
C _
S- r
l ~ W
PUTNEY
t'"*%%A l/""N F" . f" I

THE APOLLO 12 ASTRONAUTS said everything "looks Nixon observed the day with a quiet,
fine" for their Friday blast-off toward the moon. pital and his wreath was placed'
Astronauts Charles Conrad, Richard Gordon, and Alan Bean at the tomb by David Packard,
enjoyed a day of relaxation, inspecting the Saturn V rocket that will deputy secretary of defense.
launch them moonward at 11:22 a.m. Friday. The rally at t h e Washington
Conrad and Bean will attempt to land near the Surveyor 3 Monument was one of a number
spacecraft, already on the surface of the moon, while Gordon re- of occasions when supporters of
main inluna orit.the administration's war course
-___ __ ___ seized upon Veterans Day for a
show of support and a counter-
weight to the week's planned anti- WA
war activities. judge
Only 1,500, however, turned out of Co
at the 100,000-seat L o s Angeles perfoi
Memorial coliseum to h e a r the that
Wednesday, Nov. 12 nation's only surviving five-star quick
ALFRED H ITC HCO K FESTIVAL ;generaOmar Bradley, 76, de- Sho
Clare: "If we as a nation lack the
SP ELBO U N DI belief we are pledged to upholdi the ri
PU D then we do not deserve the heri-'ion'c
tage which is ours." a sco
In New York City's Union U.S
Suspenseful INGRI D BERGMAN and GREGORY Square, a young man and woman hard,
PECK love story with complex psychological over- were removed from a memorial a ph
tones. Salvidor Dali did the concluding dream se- service after their antiwar plac- cuted
quence. ard caused an argument. Fiv e Ges
"It's just another manhunt story wrapped up in wreaths were placed at the Eter- banni
psuedo-psychoanalysis."-A. Hitchcock. nal Light monument in Madison neces
7al&L9g75monRCnITECTUdEs'nwoma
7 & 9 7ARCHITECTURE Square park after a 15-block pa- vague
662-8871 AUDITORIUM rade down Fifth Avenue by abouti consti
1,000 members of veterans groups. Iltl

ourt rules against
.C. abortion statute

visit to a local veterans' hos-

kSHINGTON OP)-A federal
has struck down a District
lumbia law banning abortions
rmed by doctors and urged
his decision be appealed
ly to the Supreme Court.
ould the high court uphold
uling, prohibitions on abor-
could come tumbling down in
re of states.
.'District Court Judge Ger-
A. Gessell held yesterday that
ysician may not be prose-
for performing an abortion.
ssel ruled that the 1901 law
ng abortions except when
sary to save a pregnant
an's life or health was so
and indefinite as to be un-
itutional.
;hough his ruling dealt most

r

directly with the rights of a Wash-
ington doctor acused of perform-
ing an illegal abortion, the judge
added:
"There has been increasing in-
dication in decisions of the Su-
preme Court of the United States
that as a secular matter, a
woman's liberty and right of pri-
vacy extends to family, marriage
and sex matters, and may well in-
clude the right to remove an un-
wanted child, at least in the early
stages of pregnancy."
His ruling came after two per-
sons, the doctor and a nurse's
aide, asked him to dismiss their
indictments on the basis of a Cali-
fornia Supreme Court decision
that California law was not "suf-
ficiently certain to satisfy due
process requirements."
ART AUCTION !
THURS. EVE., NOV. 13
at 8:30 P.M.
Presented by the
MERIDIAN GALLERY
of Cleveland
featuring origiinal works of
grahic art etchings, litho-
narohs. woodcuts - byl
led n 20th century artists
r.

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MICHIGAN

LAST 2 DAYS
(ends Thursday)

1

lopop

LI

I

11

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1

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WOO
A

Ir

ACADEMY AWARD WINNER!
BEST ACTRESS!
BARBRA STREISAND
BARBRA OMAR

I

mmii.

NEXT SEMESTER:

FILMS OF THE 60's
SCEPTICS, GET A'HOLD OF THIS!

"A Moqnificent Motion
Picture! Every Line, Every
Sonq is Superperfect!"
-WABC-TNv

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JAN. 9-11
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HARD DAY'S NIGHT
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY
HUD
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Pablo Picasso
Johnny Friedloender
Bernard Buffet
Victor Vasarely
Alexander Calder
Leonard Baskin

FEB. 6-8
13-15
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THE MISFITS
YELLOWFSUBMARINE
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W A MTC YMI D RfY

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