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November 09, 1969 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-09

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Sunday, November' 9, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Mine

Sunay Nvebe 9 169THEMIHIANDALYPae in

Re tts,
By JOEL BLOCK
Sports Editor
Special To The Daily
CHAMPAIGN -- Yesterday's
57-0 humiliation of Illinois, be-
sides pushing Michigan one step
further to Pasadena, proved to
be a coming out party for a cou-
ple of Michigan's unheralded
players.
Both Bruce Elliott and Jim
Betts found their niches of star-
dom on the historic turf of Me-
morial Stadium here in Cham-
paign.
Defensive back Elliott, w1 h 0
has been playing in and out of
the shadow of t h r e e veteran
backs - Tom Curtis, Barry
Pierson, a n d Brian Healy --

lioti
found his glory in a spectacular
40-yard interception return for
a touchdown.
Betts, second string quarter-
back behind Don Moorhead,
finally realized his potential as
he threw two touchdown passes
and ran for another in a wild
Wolverine fourth quarter scor-
ing burst.
For Elliott, the accomplish-
ment was a lot more t h a n a
simple interception and touch-
down. Middle guard Henry Hill
analyzed the 'happening' in the
lockerroom after the game: "We
were all ribbing Bruce before
the game about how he was the
home town boy who was going
to show the folks how good he
is. And man, he did."

bask
Elliott grew up here in Cham-
paign while his father, Pete El-
liott, was managing (quite suc-
cessfully) the Illini fortunes. He
was All-State in both football
and baseball at Champaign Cen-
tral High School and was
brought by his uncle Bump El-
liott to Michigan when his fa-
ther was "kicked out" of Illi-
nois for an alleged slush fund.
Elliott told his own story af-
ter the game.
"All my family and a lot of
my relatives are here today. I
really wanted to get a touch-
down, an interception or just
get something in this game. It
w a s something I've always
dreamed about.

in starlight
SUNDAY SPORTS
NIGHT EDITORS: LEE KIRK and JOE MARKER
More Sports, Page 10

"My man was running a short
flag pattern, sort of a 45 degree
turn-out and he was running it
real shallow. I laid b a c k the
first two times he ran the pat-
tern because it was near the end
of the game and I thought they
would pass long.
"But the third time I figured
they were just going to try for
the short ones and I slipped up
on him.
"At first when I caught the
ball I thought I could make it
all the way down the right side-
line. Then I saw a whole bunch
of people there in front of me
and I was forced to cut inside.
"I kept running for the far
left corner but didn't think I
would make it. I heard Barry
(Pierson) yelling 'Bruce, Bruce'
and then he put a great block
on the guy nearest me. When I
found myself lying on my back
in the end zone I couldn't be-
lieve what had happened."
For his efforts, Elliott receiv-
ed the game ball fr'om his team-
mates and Coach Bo Schem-
bechler. Schembechler also add-
ed a few words of praise, "El-
liott's interception and run ex-
cited our guys more than any-
thing in the game. He's a great
kid, a good football player, and
a great competitor.
"He's right out of the old El-
liott mold."
Schembechler then turned to
the subject of his second string
quarterback, "Betts really look-
ed good, didn't he. He's a much
better quarterback than he
showed in the Wisconsin game.
I'm glad he got a chance to play
and show his stuff."
In all, Betts completed s i x

passes in nine attempts for 106
yards and two touchdowns. He
ran for another 51 yards in 9
carries, producing a third TD.
His total offense performance of
157 yards even beat Moorhead's
total by one yard.
After the game, Schembech-.
ler still evaded questions about
the Rose Bowl as he's done ever
since the loss to Michigan State.
To him, Iowa's win over Indiana
yesterday means the Hawkeyes
will be that much tougher to
beat next week.
"Iowa is a very dangerous ball
club," he said. "Right now we
have two tough games remain-
ing in Iowa and Ohio State. But
so does Purdue in Ohio State
and Indiana. An d Ohio State
has to play Purdue and us."
"So now I can't talk about
the Rose Bowl. Iowa comes
first." Glenn Doughty (22) strong-arms Illinoi
Point plethora plasters

(Continued from Page 1)
which Taylor lost but he shrug-
ged his shoulders at the Illinois
40 and left the two in a heap.
In all, Taylor collected 155 yards.
Michigan's next drive began
after an Illinois fumble. Cecil Pry-
:r clobbered quarterback Gary
Lange just as he handed off to
Darrell Robinson.
#The ball squirted foreward to

signals. Betts had some trouble
moving the team initially, though,
as the Wolverines went scoreless
for the rest of the quarter.
But as the final period got un-
derway Betts had the team closing
in on a score. Beginning the drive
at their own 30, Michigan moved'
upfield with little trouble. Betts
mixed his plays well as the Illini
saw runs, short passes and long

F
}.
1'
X
it
'
t
at
'1i
a

the Illini 49 where Henry Hill re- ones.
covered. The best executed play of the

i
I
a

-Associated Press

Garve Craw (48) tumbles into endzone

BOWL HOPES DASHED:

Iowa smashes

Indiana, 28-17

This drive was mostly of the drive. was a Betts to Harris aerial,
crunch-it-out variety as quarter- good for 32 yards and a first down
back Don Moorhead threw but on the 11 yard line. Harris ran a'
three passes, with only one com- fly and Betts laid the ball in per-+
plete that to Jerry Imsland on the fectly, an instant before Illini
15. From there it was all up the safety Bob Wintermute made thet
middle with Garvie Craw ringing tackle. The score came on a fiveI
LIP the first of his four touch- yard square-out pass to the right
downs. to fullback Craw for the tally.
The half wvas not over yet, Thenext score came at the end
though, as Illinois fumbled the of a 66 yard drive, tihe big playjI
ensuing kickoff with Michigan's being a 26 yard Betts pass to Miker
Barry Pierson recovering on the Hankwitz on the Illini one-yard
Illini 42. line. Most of the remaining yards
This time the attack on the in the drive were picked up by
ground was not so smooth as Doughty and Betts, who dove the
Moorhead threw three times, twice yard for the score.
on third down plays. Illinois took the kickoff and
The first toss went to Billy Har-
risfoan1yadgi.'enx went through the three dowvns and
for an 11 yard gain. The next a punt routine again, this time
to Jim Mandich for a first down the kick only going to the 47
on the 16. The next fell into the where Tom Curtis took the ball
hands of Glenn Doughty for a and brought it back seven yards
first and goal to go on the 4. Three a ocr
r __ _ to the I1linti 4it

Pierson's crushing block allowing
him to turn the corner and dive
into the endzone.
For the last play of the game
Mike Keller picked off a Lange'
pass to end what may have been
the most disasterous day in Illini
grid history.
Through most of the second half
the crowd was yawning, bored
with the slaughter. The only man
that could not close his eyes and
laugh was Illini Coach Jim Valek.
Valek had a lot to say starting
with injuries. "You might as wellE
put our whole squad on the injury
list, he commented.
"We had 11 players injured in
the first half and seven others in
the second-18 different players
in all."
The most serious loss, though,
came the day before the game asI
linebacker and defensive captain!
Bruce Erb suffered a broken jawj
and other injuries in a motorcycle
accident.
"Losing Erb was demoralizing,"
mused Valek. "The team came to:

-Associated Press
s' Bob Bucklin.
Illini
practice Friday in high spirits.
Then they heard the news and
they're all worrying and talking
about how bad their co-captain is
and then no longer have their
minds on the game as they
should."
Erb's loss forced personnel
changes that proved disastrous.
"His accident trigered a chain
reaction," continued Valek. "First
thing we did Friday was m o v e
(Oscar) Silva back to linebacker.
We had worked all week on plans
to use four linebackers against
Michigan. Erb goes down, then
(Veto) Santini gets hurt in the
first half - then (Moe) K e lly
gets a dislocated shoulder and we
end up with (Don) Darlington,
(Rich) Kristak, (Norris) C o 1 e-
man and Silva at linebackers in
the second half. The first two
haven'tchad game experience at
the position and the other two
were playing with injuries."
The injuries most likely would
not have changed the outcome,
but would probably have just held
down the score.

By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON -- Jerry Nel-
son blocked a third-period In-
diana punt yesterday to set up
Iova's vinning touchdown in a
28-17 victory that virtually killed
the racially-troubled Hoosier's
hopes of representing the Big Ten
in the Rose Bowl.
With the Hawkeyes trailing 14-
13, middle guard Nelson went
straight up the middle to smoth-
er the kick by John Isenbarger.
Dan McDonald recovered the
football on Indiana's 18-yard line
and tailback Dennis Green put
Iowa ahead four plays later with
a 5-yard touchdown run.
Green added another touch-
down, icing the game late in the
final period after linebacker Dave
Brooks intercepted a Harry Gonso
pass and returned it 23 yards to
the Indiana 5-yard line.
Indiana, its squad thinned out
at midweek by the departure of
10 protesting Negro players, had
taken the lead in the third period
mainly on the hard running of
Isenbarger. The Hoosier halfback
totaled 140 yards on 21 carries and
scored one touchdown.
Quarterback Larry Lawrence
accounted for two Iowa touch-
downs. He broke three tackles on
a first quarter 40-yard scoring
run and passed 19 yards to flank-
er Kerry Reardon fo' another
touchdown.
* * *
i'u(dIgers b rid
COLUMBUS. Ohio -Top-ranked
Ohio State, led by No. 2 quarter-
back Ron Maciejowski, coupled its
awesome attack with a brilliant
defense Saturday, a n d thumped
Wisconsin 62-7 for the Buckeyes'
21st. straight football victory be-
fore 86,519 in Ohio Stadium.
Maciejowski, replacing the in-
jured Rex Kern, engineered the
Bucks to a 34-0 halftime lead. Hej
rolled up 247 yards in two and a
half quarters as Ohio State scored
the most lopsided victory in its 39-
game series with Wisconsin.
Fullback Jim Otis bulled o ni e
yard three times for touchdowns
and rushed for 68 yards. He play-
ed only the first half as the Buck-
eyes maintained their Big Te n
lead with their fifth straight win
this season and 16th in a row in'
the conference in the last three
years.
Meanwhile, the Ohio State de-
fense intercepted two passes andj
recovered two Wisconsin fumbles.
The Badgers, suffering their sixth'
loss in eight games, did not move
past the Buckeye 38-yard line un-'
til their touchdown in the closing
minutes.
Substitute quarterback Gary'
Losse passed 14 yards to end Mel

BULLETIN
The Michigan Soccer Club
climaxed its regular season with
a 1-1 tie with Wright State at
Dayton yesterday, in a match
that lasted through double over-
time. The tie left the Michigan
footmen with a 5-2-2 record
for the year.
For the second year in a row'
Kern sat out the Wisconsin game.t
The Lancaster, Ohio, junior rested
a bruised shoulder for next week's
important Big Ten date here with
Purdue.
Maciejowski. who directed a 43-8
triumph at Wisconsin last year,
was just as sharp this time. The
junior from Bedford, Ohio, led the
Ohio State rushers with 108 yards
and hit nine of 13 passes for 139
yards and two touchdowns.
Stite swamped
LAFAYETTE - Purdue's Mike
Phipps, the Big Ten's top passer,
and Stan Brown, the league's top
scorer, led a methodical whipping
of the Michigan State football
team yesterday,.41-13.
Jeff Jones, the Boilermakers'
automatic kicker, cracked a na-I
tional collegiate record with five
conversions that gave him a string
of 39.
Jones also booted field goals of
30 and 37 yards.
Phipps picked up 292 yards and
became the sixth-best on total
offense in the National Collegiate
Athletic Association history. He
now has a career total offense of
5,470 yards.
Michigan State's miseries in-
cluded the loss of sophomore Steve
Piro, who started at quarterback
for the first time and tore the
ligaments in his right knee in
the first quarter.
The Spartans turned over the

signal calling to another sopho-
more, Dan Werner, who had never
played in a college game.
Werner proved to be a strong
passer, hitting for 314 yards, in-
cluding a 47-yard scoring throw
to Stephen Kough.
Purdue had the Spartans down
31-0 at the half.
Brown scored two of Purdue's
touchdowns on short runs. Phipps

Indiana blacks'
ar grievances
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (P) -
Ten Negro football players su-
spended from the Indiana Univer-
sity squad for two consecutive un-

passed to Ashley Bell for one and excused absences from practice plays later Crav powered in for his
ran over one himself. released a list of eight grievances. second score of the day.
S 'Their statement broke a silence Mercifully, the half ended, but
which had existed since t h e y unmercifully the game continued
were refused reinstatement after 15 minutes later.
MINNEAPOLIS - Sophomore mnising practice last Tuesday and The Illini received but had the
fullback Ernie Cook blasted six Wednesday. Coach John Pont had ball for only three plays and a
yards for a fourth period t i e - a policy of dismissal for two un- punt before Michigan began to
breaking touchdown Saturday as excused absences. roll again.
the Minnesota Gophers turned The grievances listed by the Moorhead did most of the dam-
back Northwestern 28-21. player were inadequate medical age this time, running four times
treatment, subjection to degrading for 24 yards in the 73 yard drive
Cook, playing for the injured r and passing to Jim Mandich com-
Jimn Carter, gained 141 yards. remarks, inconsistency in looking ;n costefedfr3 oe
rushing in 25 carries as the Goph- after their physical and mental ing across the field for 32 more.
e's won their second straight welfare to the same extent as'th ,fas Cawastefre
game. white players, inconsistent dis- though, as Craw blasted for the
ciplinary action, and making de- final yard.
After Cook's fourth period moralizing implications. The next time Michigan got the
touchdown with 9:34 to play, __________ ball, Jim Betts was calling the
Northwestern drove to the Minne-
sota 26 before a fourth down pass Tilorig' , theirwicay to victory
attempt failed.
The performance by Cook and ,MICH. ILL. Passing
two other Minnesotda sophomores FIRST DOWNS 27 10 Att. Comp. Int. Yds.
overshadowed the play of North- Rushing 14 7 Livas 8 3 1 52
western tailback Mike Adamle Passing 14 3 Lange 6 3 2 29
who scored the Wildcat touch-' Penalty 0 0 Pass Receiving
TOTAL NO. OF RUSHES 73 42 No. Yds.
downs on runs of three, five and NET YDS. - Rushing 328 138 Kaiser 1 9
one yards and gained 163 yards Passing 196 91 Pickering 2 20
rushin in 32 carries. FORWARD PASSES Dieken 2 26
Attemupted 24 14 Bess 1 36
Minnesota defensive end Leon Cnompleted i 6 Punting
Trawick started the winning drive Intercepted by 3 0 No. Avg.
when he recovered Mike Hud- Yards Intercep. Ret'd. 50 0 Masar 7 31.7
s TOTAL PLAYS 97 56 * * * *
sOn's fumble at the Northestern TOTAL YDS. GAINED 524 229 MICHIGAN
49. PUNTS, Number 3 7 Rushing
The other sophomore standouts Average distance 43.3 31.7 Tries Gains Loss Net
for the Gophers were Dave Hum-- PUNTS RETURNED 4 1 Moorhead 21 81 15 66
leker, who ran for a nine I Yards Punts returned 20 -31Taylor 18 155 0 155
leexh a o ieyard KICKS RETURNED BY 1 10 Craw 9 18 0 18
touchdown and set up Phil Hag- Yards returned 2? 178 Doughty 13 39 3 36
en's four-yard TD pass to Ray FUMBLES, Number 1 4 Betts 9 52 1 51
Parson with a 19-yard reception, Ball lost by 0 3 Seyferth 2 2 0 2
and defensive back Gary Hohman, PENALTIES, Number 3 3 Gabler 1 0 0 o
x'orcd3yadfoatoc- Yards penalized ._3 35 Passing
who raced 38 yards for a touch- SCORE BY PERIOD: Att. Comp. Int. Yds.
down after an interception. Miehigan 0 23 7 27-57 Moorhead 15 8 0 90
Illinois 0 0 0 0- 0 Beltts 9 6 0 106.
Im4 o -Pass Receiving
ILLINOIS No. Yds.
n ARushing abler 1 13

The scenario for this drive was
much the same as the last as Betts
and Doughty did most of the dam-
age, the big play a pass to Hank-
witz on the Illinois 14. On the next
play Doughty went for no gain and
a Betts pass to Harris fell incom-
plete.
Then John Gabler snuck out of
the backfield and took the toss
from Betts for the touchdown.
The Michigan offense called it
a day at this point but the de-
fense had not yet begun to fight.1
After narrowly missing an in-
terception, Bruce Elliott picked off
the next pass at the Illini 40 and
returned it for the score. At the
I twenty-five Elliott cut back the
width of the field with Barry
COMPLETE
ENGINE
MAINTENANCE
ASHLEY
AUTO SERVICE
507 S. Ashley
serving AA for 15 years

Stand up for what
you know is right. Stand up and
be counted. Don't let anyone make up your mind for you.
You know the issues. Be sure you vote and vote for what
you're sure is right. Make your vote count. Vote NO! on
the bookstore referendum November 10 and 11.

Folletts, Overbecks, Slaters, Ulrichs, Wahrs
J111n"The Daily 'Today!

Big Ten 5

F ~5 u ~u Eli

Conference Games
A L T PF PA

All Games
W L T PF

Ohio State
Purdue
MICHIGAN
Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Michigan State
Illinois

5
4
4
3
2
i2
i
0

0
1
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

226
186
170
125
103
86
84
80
75
42

41
117
59
91
128
115
121
175
142
198

0
1
2
4
4
5
6
6
5
8

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

330
292
274
204
209
161
100
131
153
92

PA
55
201
120
168
224
240
240
300
210
302

kian
Jack sonU
Bargo
Bess
Robinson
Wright
Lange
Beek

Tries
4
1
14
11
7
5

Gain
23
0
4
58
53
1
20

s Loss Net Hankwi
it 12 Harris
3 -3 Iinslanci
0 4 Mandic]
2 56 Dought
2 51 Craw
0 1
7 --3
0 20 Werner

itz
y

3 52
4 58
1 11
2 36
1 7
2 19
Punting
No. Avg.
3 43.3

Woilliam F. Buckley
\it

EUROPE J'70
SUMMER CHARTER FLIGHTS
Fly the Reliables!

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