100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 09, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YOUNG DEMOCRA
endorse
Jerry De Grie
for a more effectiye and dynan

page
three

aP

MfrPi i

i
ttt

NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

STS

Sunday, November 9, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

>: i .

ck
iiC

SGC politics change from suits to jeans

I:

I

By SHERI MALDAVER and
RICK PERLOFF
The members of the 1966 Student
Government Council sat quietly at the
table. Dressed impeccably with shirts, ties
and suit coats, the Council members
waited -- as was customary - for the
entragce of the SGC President - Ed
Robinson.
Robinson walked in. He sat down and
laid his heavy army boots on the table.
This, relates SGC secretary Mrs. Mary
Samuelson, startled the trimmed-up
Council members.
Now, of course, SGC members do not
wear anything more than ruffled blue
jeans. But in many ways this symboliz-
es the transition from what former SGC
member Barry Bluestone (now an SDS
leader) termed "the conservative non-

political SGC" of the mid-1960s to the
more aware Council of today
According to Bluestone, SGC in those
days was "pro-administration." SGC
and the administration had the s a m e
ideas and spoke the same language.
Prof. Joseph Payne, chairman of the
Senate Advisory Committee on Univer-
sity Affairs, and one who has as good
an ear to the administration as any --
says that SGC is "somewhat more mili-
tant" than in the early '60s.
The platforms of the Council candi-
dates in 1964 sharply differ from those
of the candidates running in tomorrow's
election.
The '64 platform called for revision of
residence hall contracts, installation of
free parking on campus, general improve-
ments in off-campus housing and t h e
opening of a discount student bookstore.
Today's candidates speak little of

dorm changes or free parking. Since
1964 the freshman residency require-
ment has been abolished and women's
hours vastly liberalized.
Instead of asking for changes in off-
campus housing, now platforms demand
the University construct lost-cost hous-
ing and separate room and board con-
tracts. Some candidates call for ending
classified research and beginning open
admissions.
"A 1964 platform," s a y s Bluestone
"would just criticize a bad situation
whereas a 1969 platform would analyze
it and construct solutions."
SGC members still write letters to ad-
ministrators and continue to organize
Diag rallies, but there has been no
dearth of activity.
Last year Council co-sponsored t h e

M-

TON IGHT

CAT

BA

LOU

drive to abolish language requiremerts,
resulting in a new degree, Bachelor of
General Studies, which has no require-
ments.
And this year its Diag rallies have led
to confrontation with the administration
and a student-run discount bookstore.
Although there was a conczrted at-
tempt to gain a student bookstore ear-
lier, no action was effected. In 1964 an
SGC committee wrote a long report
advocating the creation of a student-con-
trolled University bookstore.
Ruth Bauman, a member of the com-
mittee, says the report dealt with broad
conceptual theories and the reasoning
behind the suggestion. It was presented
to the vice president for student affairs
and turned down. She says the issue
died with the first rejection.
'U' alters
plans for
IM Bldg.
(Continued from Page 1)

NORTH CAMPUS MOVIE NIGHT
S , £ n 9 P.M.

I

I

North lampus-bursley

25c

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

LAST TIME ROUND AND AROUND
Music moving by those Ace Truckers,
COMMANDER CODY and
THE LOST PLANET AIRMEN,
$1.50 all night
Doors open at 8; ears at 9, Mouths filled
between sets and quietly during TONIGHT

NORTH VIETNAMESE TROOPS assaulted a government I
amphibious base in the Mekong Delta yesterday for the second
time in three days.
Five South Vietnamese were killed defending the base, located
138 miles southwest of Saigon. Four American bases along the Cam-
bodian border north of Saigon were also heavily bombarded during
the night.
In Washington, Senators Edward W. Brooke (R-Mass) and John
G. Tower (D-Texas) warned Hanoi yesterday that stepped-up fighting
would only refuel the war.
TIE SOVIET UNION has named Vladimir S. Semenov, a
deputy foreign minister, as chief delegate for the U.S.-Soviet
missile talks.
Semenov is a high-ranking diplomat whose appointment is seen,
in Washington as an indication that Moscow is serious about the arms
limitation talks which are scheduled to begin in Helsinki, Nov. 17.
Soviet President Nicolai V. Podgorny said Thursday, "It has be-
come more and more imperative to take real steps that would put
an end to the escalation of the arms race."
THE U.S. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT charged that Alabama
is operating an institution where Negro juvenile offenders are
mistreated and deprived of rehabilitation.
The government has asked to join as a plaintiff to a private suit
filed last January against an all-black school at Mt. Meigs. The action
claims that inmates of the school are beaten, forced to perform farm
labor and are cruelly punished.
The complaint asks the U.S. District Court to order the school
raised to the standards of two similar all-white institutions in Birm-
ingham or closed.
* * *

.44

77777777777"

{. -

We Are Looking for Talent
For A Nationwide TV Show
The producers of the All American College Show, hosted by Arthur
Godfrey, will hold auditions in the Union Ballroom from 4:00 P.M. to
9:00 P.M. on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 1969.
Those chosen will be flown to Hollywood to appear on a national tele--
vision show and have a chance to win up to $5,000.00 !
All registered college students are eligible.
We need singers, dancers, instrumentalists and novelty acts. Exception:
no heavy classical acts.
Bring your own accompanist!

SENATOR WILLIAM PROXMIRE (D-Wis) has accused the
Pentagon of announcing misleading budget reductions while ac-
tually planning spending increases.
Proxmire charges that the Defense Department makes repeat(
announcements of minimum cuts. He also claims some cuts will on
lead to increased spending - mothballing old ships, for examp.
As a result, the Senator says he will seek substantial cuts in the 7
billion defense budget next month.
* * *
AN INCREASE in the personal income tax exemption may be
added to the tax reform bill.
Senator Albert Gore (D-Tenn) is confident the Senate w
support the measure. He originally proposed an increase to $10(
but settled on a compromise $850. The increase would be offset by
decrease in tax relief.

ed
ly
le.
0-

l
G
E
I
E

-Associated Press
Results of 'Boston 8' raid
Selective Service officials survey the damage at one of six draft
board offices raided yesterday morning by the 'Boston 8' in
Boston, Mass.-.
NOV .15 MARCH:
M obilization expects

Call offices for further information
763-1107 or 769-5474
THEY'RE ON THE WAY!

.4> .X4 _ 4 '. - ::4 X

If you re
CHICKEN I
Then don't join
the DAILY
BUSINESS STAFF
(It takes guts to tolerate our staff !)

The University of Michigan Men's Glee Club

and

The Ohio Stale University Men's Glee Club

1
f
7
I
i

HELD OVER
"05T H W EEK
Program Information 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
TODAY LICE'S
1,3 3p 5, 7, YA IT

wiesprea
ill (Continued from Page 1)
DO would be available if needed. a
a The Washington police depart- wa
ment cancelled all weekend to1
leaves. Precautionary plans to in
deal with possible disorders were tio
readied.t
The preparations were an -_i
nounced as Justice Department pe
officials-without giving details th
-said pro-violence groups had Ri
infiltrated the march and there ph
is a "substantial likelihood of m
serious violence." They said a
they would permit only a sym- me
bolic parade down Pennsylvania
Ave. past the White House. The
New Mobilization committee cre
then offered to switch the route St
to Constitution Avenue, and the cie
Justice Department agreed. pl
The New Mobilization group, mo
however, objected that the solu- de
tion the department offered I
would ignore its demand that di
the parade be allowed to pass SD
in front of the White House. -
The group plans to detour off by
Constitution Ave. to pass by the su:
White House. len
ia
Spare them the headache
of being responsible for $275,0
of your money that will be place
Save these precious few. Vote!
on the bookstore referendum.

backing
New Mobe spokesmen say that
commitment to nonviolence
as the only price of admission
the crazyquilt coalition build-
g the Washington demonstra-
on.
"We are as lease as interested
if not more interested-in a
aceful demonstration" than
e government, said the Rev.
chard Fernandez of Philadel-
ia, director of Clergy and Lay-
en Concerned about Vietnam,
Mobe steering comhmittee
ember.
A notable absentee is the in-
easingly more revolutionary
udents for a Democratic So-
ety, an organization that has
ayed a major role in radical
ovement tactics over the past
cade.
The most violent and unpre-
ctable of any of the many
DS factions-the Weatherman
was the only group mentioned
the Justice Department in
pporting its warnings of vio-
nce.

tion, but added that he doubts the
results of a student referendum on
the question would be given sig-
nificant weight by the adminis-
tration.
As part of the Student Govern-
ment Council elections tomorrow
and Tuesday, students will be ask-
ed whether they should have con-
trol over tuition increases for use
on construction projects.
The referendum was placed on
the ballot with the general under-
standing that, if it passes, a ref-
erendum specifically aimed at
whether students fees should be
used for construction of the in-
tramural facilities would be placed
on the ballot in the spring.
Smith's letter to Canham in-
dicated that the administration
has examined and rejected the
possibility of renovating" t h e
Waterman - Barbour gymnasium
complex as an alternative to build-
ing the new structure.
Smith wrote that this alterna-
tive was rejected because it
"would cost a minimum of 50
per cent of the proposed new
structure and would yield a build-
ing of uncertain life, limited pro-
gram, inefficient operation, a n d
locatedaonra site which is far
more appropriate for academic
undertakings."
Specifically, Smith mentioned
the Chemistry Bldg. as "the most
likely candidate" for the present
site of Waterman-Barbour.
The letter also indicated that
the estimate of the cost of the
building at $7 per students per
term was the minimum. T h e
exact cost would depend on the
nature of the building and t h e
rate of interest on the m o n e y
which would be borrowed to fin-
ance construction. The tuition in-
crease would be used to pay off
this loan.
March talks
continue
(Continued from Page 1)
and on to the Mall. New, Mobe
leaders rejected Friday's offer by
the Justice Department of only
Constitution Ave. because it did
not pass near the White House,
the symbolic focus of the mass
march.
Young pointed out that "no one
route can handle all the people
fast enough. What we have pro-
posed is that the march move out
at 10 a.m., and that the remaining
people take other routes as well
at noon so that they will all arrive
at the Mall in time for the rally."
The rally on Saturday, Nov. 15
will climax three days of renewed
opposition to the Nixon admin-
istration's policy in Vietnam.
j NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES~
FOH VILLa6E
375 No. MAPLE PD. -769-1300
MON-FRI,-7:10-9:20
SAT.-SUN.-5:10-7:15-930
M
HCASSiDY AND
THE SUNDANCE KID

v' .
Friday
and
Saturday
at
1, 3,5,
7, 9 P.M,
AND I
11 P.M.

441,
{: _ t,

R-

ed in their hands.
NO November 10 and 11
Le-a. s--- S r r,+I~ w r~~w

JOINT CONCERTS

r°> >;<>

r

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan