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November 06, 1969 - Image 3

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What's tBIFOUSB
What's the ugliest part of your body? Certainly not
COMMANDER CODY and
THE LOST PLANET AIRMAN
the legendary Ann Arbor band that brings it home
FRIDAY-SATURDAY-SUNDAY.
NOV. 7-9-Hot licks off cold steel and donuts $1.50

page;
Iliec

P

Sfrtitan

it

NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

Thursday, November 6, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Student counselors:

Viable alternative

By GARY BLAUER and GARY SOLOMON
When was the last time your counselor offered you
donuts and coffee? Or yelled across a crowded room,
"Hey, who's good in Hebrew 457?" Or had trouble
hearing you because people kept walking between
you? If this all seems strange, you are obviously
missing something.
Hidden deep in the bowels of Angell Hall (1018
to be exact) is the LSA Student Counseling Office,
where these experiences are not uncommon.
In what must be nearly a unique situation, the ad-
ministration, faculty, students and alumni are all
pleased with the new organization.
And the office has inspired counterparts in the
schools of education and architecture and design.
The Student Counseling Office aims to provide a
viable alternative and supplement to the regular 'U'
counseling services. At the LSA office, student coun-
selors talk to an average of 50 students per day and
over 100 students per day during advance classifica-
tion.

Course recommendations by the counselors are based
on more than the LSA catalogue and course require-
ments, although the office does provide such informa-
tion.
Counseling is based instead upon first-hand know-
ledge of course content and the instructor. S t u d e n t
counselors will not hesitate to tell you that the course
you are considering is not very good or that the pro-
fessor who is teaching the course you may elect is a
bore,
If a counselor cannot answer your question, he will
locate another counselor who can, or refer you to the
correct University office.
There are five student coordinators and about 30
other juniors, seniors, and graduate students who staff
the office without pay.
The idea of such an organization was promoted and
developed by LSA Associate Dean James Shaw and in-
terested students. .
Shaw believes the office fulfills a desirable and al-
most necessary function" and is "complementary" rath-

er than competitive with the regular counselors. The
two counseling groups have met with positive reactions
from both the student and faculty counselors.
"I think it made the faculty more enthusiastic about
the student counselors", explained Shaw.
The faculty criticism that occurred when the serv-
ice was first initiated has stopped. "We received more
compliments in the first week than in the past year,"
said Shaw.
Shaw added that faculty counselors seemed pleased
with the work of the student counselors. "The Student
Counseling Office does a good pre-counseling service in
answering questions which faculty counselors should
not or could not answer," he said.
Funding is a problem, but alumni donations have
helped considerably. In addition, some money may
be found from University funds. LSA Dean William
Hays said he has asked the Development Counsel of
the University if they might be interested in providing
money for this project.
See STUDENT, Page 8

4 new Lovestick GlossesM
for lips: Natural, Peach,
Pink and Beige, $1.50.
4 new LovesticksM
Love Iced Pink,
Love Iced Tea,
Love Iced Coffee,
Love Iced Cocoa, $1.50.
3 new softly shiny LovelidsMshadows
foreyes: Cream, Grey, Lavender, $1.50

te
news today
The Associated Press acrd Cotle, ePress Service

Police rout 300 pickets

in MIT

Inc.
State Street at North University, Ann
Arbor, Michigan. Open Monday until
8:30, Tuesday through Saturday until.
6:00. Phone 663-4121.
We have loads of Love cosmetics by Menley & James.

TIIE SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS COMMITTEE drop-
ped plans for public hearings on the Vietnam war while it seeks
additional word on President Nixon's policy to cut back U.S. in-j
volvement.
Secretary of State William P. Rogers and Secretary of Defense
Melvin R. Laird will be asked to testify during the week of Nov. 17 in
closed session instead of in public as originally planned.'
Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark.), the committee chairman, said they
will be asked questions Nixon raised in his Monday night address to
the nation, as well as other aspects of the Vietnam situation.
TIlE GALLUP POLL says 77 per cent of the people who lis-I
tened to President Nixon's Vietnam policy speech Monday approv-
ed of it.
Only 6 per cent were opposed outright to Nixon's program and 17'
per cent were undecided, the poll reported.
The study was conducted Monday night immediately after the
speech. A nationwide telephone survey revealed that about 7 in 10
persons heard the speech. Among this group, interviewers reported aI
large percentage were impressed and reassured by Nixon's remarks.
*
TIHE SENATE COMMERCE COMMITTEE approved a bill
that would outlaw cigarette advertising on radio and television
after Jan. 1, 1971.
The bill was sent to the Senate floor by voice vote.
Some senators expressed reservations about certain portions butI
did not oppose the ultimate goal of removing cigarette commercials
from the air.
The advertising provision of the bill is one of a number of amend-
ments which attempts to reverse a major tobacco industry victory in
the House last spring.
TUFTS UNIVERSITY obtained a court order to halt black
student picketing at a campus construction site.
About 100 members of the university Afro-American society oc-
cupied the site for six hours yesterday to dramatize their demands for
more minority group workers on a dormitory project,
The temporary injunction barring the students from trespassing
was issued in Middlesex Superior Court.
EGYPTIAN COMMANDOS crossed the Suez Canal and at-
tacked an Israeli patrol.
Egypt said its force yesterday killed an Israeli officer and eight;
soldiers, captured another wounded man and destroyed two armored
cars and a tank, but Israel disputed the results of the raid.

demon stration
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (P--Three
hundred antiwar pickets were
driven away from a Massachusetts
-} Institute of Technology research
laboratory yesterday by an almdst
equal number of police.
>he demonstrators, in their sec-
ond day ofaprotesting war-related
research at MIT, were pushed
back by tightly drawn platoons of
officers holding riot batons. Spo-
radic clashes broke out,
The demonstrators gathered be-
fore Instrumentation Laboratory,
where 175 researchers worked on
the guidance. system for the Po-
seidon missile.
MIT said it knew of seven per-
sons who were injured.
Police said one former MIT stu-
dent was arrested, but several
other persons taken briefly into
custody were not booked.
>' Police allowed the demonstra-
S° tors, led by the November Action
Coalition, to retreat slowly down

Police brea

_ .
w%=cas al utigs.ThI
one' a s ingy
do be-ntwo li
pupewihte ay
,hprieb ledrg t
onth w is.
f ;zes 5-13P.'
2 600

PETI IT IONS,
By ERIC SCHEN
"The Soviet Governn
getting awuaytwith murd
cording to Larry Schwart
man of the Students fo

the open end of the narrow street
fronting on the one-story, ram-
shackle laboratory.
Cambridge City Solicitor Philip
Cronin and a police lieutenant
-a5sociateciPress were knocked down in scuffles, and
three newsmen said they were
k up MIT demonstration knocked down or struck by police
--__ clubs.
It was Cronin, after seeing sev-
PICKETS: eral laboratory employes thrown
aside and prevented from entering
the laboratory, who conferred with
j) Mayor Walter F. Sullivan and then
called police from their marshall-
inlg points.
e" MIT said the university-owned
A) m laboratory is on a public way two
a- S l IS m blocks from the main campus,
and that the decision to call police
K dents have signed these petitions, was made by civil authorities, not
e as well as 100 Ann Arbor resi- the school.
Went s ;dnts.Officers from Cambridge, Bos-
fer," ac- dents. ton S ervill the 1erooltan
z, chair- On Sunday, October 26, the Dto, Som i, t ndrotan
r Soviet group picketed a gathering of UN District Commission and state
delegates sponsored by the UAC police were used.
halt the international committee. T h e The police, grouped in tight
enocide" marchers then tried to present a ranks, moved in platoons, not scat-
;emilio Soydent-signed petition to t he tring into the crowed of retreat-
ue milliont iet delgate butwere usuc ing demonstrators except in iso-
groupit'Sovilglated instances.
ent Gov- cessful. ftdisacs
nitio as Future SSJ activities include v Repeated warnings from police
;ninn asover bullhorns and loudspeakers
nization. setting up a table regularly in preceded the police march.
year. At the fishbowl. The group also plans Laboratory employes began re-
ve mem- a major rally in the spring, and porting for work soon after the
students. hopes to have speakers from all police action.
over the country.

* ;Jewry SSJ .
SENATE DEMOCRATIC LEADER MIKE MANSFIELD said The SSJ is trying to1
Senate consideration of the nomination of Judge Clement Hayns- "cultural and religious g
worth Jr. to the Supreme Court will probably be taken up late of the Soviet Union's three
nex wekJews. A relativ ely new g
next week. is about to apply to Stude
Reversing an earlier announcement, Mansfield said he has new erinent Council for recog
information that the nomination will not be further delayed, an official student orga
Mansfield said chances are 50-50 for the confirmation, but Sen. SSJ was started thiss
Philip Hart (D-Mich.) has predicted easy defeat for Haynsworth. present there are ten acti
' * bers and a roster of 45s
THE SENATE overrode its Appropriations Committee and The group is student-run
approved additional funds requested by President Nixon to assist taining ties only with to
int dsre a-t'n chnnlc n b ti i ii ti in Foundation.

n

nL, ile-
:he Hi1leI

u1 ''~"gi ','G6Ig sc nosi ana C A cm aL ng a.IJJmrII scrmna1I12U on n e-
ployment.
Senate GOP leader Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania said an extra $8'
million to help school districts desegregate was made necessary by the
Supreme Court's Oct. 29 decision ordering an immediate end to dual
school systems.
!Read and Use.
SI__ __ailv Classi fies

The SSJ is currently faced with
many problems. Relying on con-
tributions for financial support,
the group operates on a limited
budget.
Currently the SSJ pickets at
different business areas of Ann
Arbor every Thursday from 4-5
p.m., circulating petitions.
Schwartz says, about 600 s t u-

The group's major goals includej
involving more students in the
protests and ultimately seeing a
UN resolution condemning t h e
USSR's treatment of its Jews.
Many of the rights which SSJ
would like granted to Soviet Jews
include the right of free worship,}
the lifting of the ban limiting the1
printing of Jewish materials, and!
the right of free exit from t h e
I Soviet Union.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrie, $3.00 by
mail.

1

BAHAMAS
Dec. 27-Jan. 3
8 FABULOUS DAYS
7 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
CHOICE OF:
$219 at Freeport Inn
Includes:
* Round Trip Jet Air Fare;
* 7 Nights Accommoda-
tions
* 7 Great Happy Hours
* Gala New Year's Party

a U..l .v~v c .vac

STEVE
fMC 4IIJEN
AS
Detective Lt. Frank
ulitt- -some
other hind of cop.

DIAL 8-6416s
Speokinq of Toqethernsess .

HELD OVER
mr - 5TH WEEK
Praora tnformation 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
SHOWS
TODAY ALICES
1, 3,5, 7, E AU A"

Q =_:; GET fMUE _ A uo«c s TECHNICOLOR -FROM WARNER BROS.-SEYEN ARTS 7
TODAY and FRIDAY at 9 P.M.
They're young... they're in love
...and they kill people.

9 .M.
Friday
and
Saturday
at
1, 3, 5,
7, 9 P.M.
AND
11 P.M.

er;
xS ; g

(1
I

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