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November 02, 1969 - Image 9

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Sundcav. November 2, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

-,,.....,v .v Novme . 199TEMC GA DIL

Offense,

defense split

g

By BILL CUSUMANO
Associate Sports Editor
If Don Canham could have foreseen the results of yester-
day's pounding of Wisconsin, he could have advertised the
contest as a doubleheader. The Wolverines looked awesome in
the first half, piling up 35 points and totally stifling the
Badgers.
Then the second' half arrived and the offense seemingly
forgot how to play. While the defenders continued to play tough
and hold Wisconsin to its lone score, the attack sputtered and
never once moved beyond the 50.
"When you get things too easily it's bad," explained Bo
Schembechler in the locker room. "You just don't suck it up
and play like you should again," he said.
But Schembechler certainly wasn't disappointed in his
club's performance. "The first half was as good as we've played
all year," he stated. "We dominated the game. We executed well
and we scored; we scored a lot," he said in what could be the
understatement of the year.
Michigan certainly was dominant and the final stats of
the game should be those compiled in the first half because
that was when the contest was ended. The Wolverines, led by
a -fantastic running performance by Bill Taylor, blasted out 183
yards on the ground, 73 more through the air as they scored
from all points on the field.
TAYLOR BROKE LOOSE on two scintillating r u n s for
scores, one covering 37 yards and the other 51. After those
touchdowns gave Michigan a 14-0 edge, the Wolverines decided
to prove they could grind it out too. The result was an 80-yard
drive capped by Garvie Craw's one yard plunge.
The defense must have enjoyed the running show because
Barry Pierson soon got into the act by returning a punt 51
yards to the end zone. Don Moorhead then finished the fire-
works by passing the Wolverines in for another six, the last 12
yards being covered with a toss to All-American end Jim Man-
dich.
The defense forced the Badgers to punt four times, most
of them being line drives and Pierson finally took advantage of
one. Wisconsin then tried to burn the Wolverines with the long
ball and found that it couldn't be done with Tom Curtis around.
The All-American safety picked off a would-be bomb, returned
it to the 35 and Moorhead turned it into six points less than
two minutes later. The only break that wasn't converted all day
was a fumbled kick-off.
Taking advantage of mistakes and burying an opponent
in the early stages of a game have been weak points for the
Wolverines this year. Missed opportunities against Missouri and
Michigan State played big parts in the two defeats that have
been suffered. There was no letdown yesterday, though, as
- Michigan displayed a killer instinct.
s "THE FIRST HALF was very encouraging," Schembechler
o told reporters after the game. "We're definitely a better team
d, than at the start of the season." Schembechler found bright
d spots in the second half, too. "I liked the defense in the second
half," he said, "they had to stay out there a lot."
5e Displaying what could be called a "Doomsday Defense", the
r- Wolverine constantly stalled Wisconsin within their own 20-
y yard line. Michigan conceded the short passes to sophomore
e

--Daily-Randy Edmonds

Michigan quarterback Don Moorhead gets off a TD pass

KERN'S MAGIC TOUCH

Buckeyes

bury Wildcats

W
*aBig Ten Conference football vic
By The Associated Press tr eeysedy
tory here yesterday.
EVANSTON - Jim Otis scored Carter scored four touchdown
three touchdowns and became as the Gophers, who went int
Ohio State's greatest rushing full- the game with an 0-5-1 recor
back, but it took a tricky quar- rushed for 317 yards and picke
terbackk-RexKern-to crankrup up 116 more on passes.
the top ranked Buckeyes for a The rugged Minnesota defens
35-6 Big Ten football victory over shut off three first half Iowa scor
out-manned Northwestern yester- ing opotes rought Io b
day. ing opportunities, brought on b
three Gopher fumbles inside th
The Buckeyes, favored by five 26-yard line,

-Daily-Randy Edmonds
Tom Curtis lassoes a Badger
quarterback Neil Graff and never let him near the big play.
Graff was able to complete 20 passes mostly because Mich-
igan chose to play its defensive backs well off receivers. When
asked why, Schembechler just pointed to the Tartan Turf, in-
dicating that the field was wet and no chances were being
taken on slips.
When it did come time to play tight, though, the Big Ten's
top defensive backfield showed why it has that reputation.
Playing in a man to man goal line defense Curtis, Pierson, and
Brian Healy blanketed the Badger receivers. Curtis did a par-
ticularly tough job on Wisconsin's top notch tight end, Stu
Voight.
The backs of course were helped out by a stepped up pass
rush. The line, led by Henry Hill, Cecil Pryor and Pete Newell
kept pressure on Graff near the goal line and Wolfman Tom
Darden was a constant bother to the Badgers with his blitzes.
BUT THE DEFENSE was the team for the whole game any-
way. The offense only showed up in the first half. The results
could be slightly terrifying if both units put together a full
game at the same time. A weak Illinois team could find out
next week.
"We keep hanging in there," smiled Schembechler. "We're
not great, but we get a little better every week." Michigan fans
just hope that improvement will be a continuation of the power
of yesterday's first half. The smell of Roses is in the air and
people realize that the Wolverines could improve themselves into
a trip to Pasadena.
Don't tell that to Schembechler, though. "Rose Bowl talk
upsets me," he replied to queries about the subject. "We have
a tough road to hoe and we're just playing them one at a time."
However, a logical surmise would be that improving while play-
ing them one at a time could be a way to plant roses in that
road. All that's really needed is two halves of solid football by
both units. Canham really doesn't want to try gridiron double-
headers anyway.

touchdowns, thundered to their
sixth triumph of the season and
the 20th in a row since 1967 as
Kern demoralized the Wildcats
with a deft blend of passing and
his own keeper sweeps.
The magical OSU quarterback
rushed for 94 yards on 12 carries
and hit 10 of 17 passes for 117
yards before he left the game
shaken up early in the fourth!
period.

Meanwhile, Minnesota turned
two Hawkeye fumbles into touch-'
downs.
The Gophers recovered an Iowa
fumble on the fifth play of the
game and marched 84 yards in
seven plays for A touchdown. The
big play was a 46-yard pass from
quarterback Phil Hagen to half-
back George Kemp. Carter went
over on a three-yard plunge.

SUNDAY SPORTS
NIGHT EDITORS: PAT ATKINS AND ERIC SIEGEL

-Associated Press

Kern's magic touch?

SCORES

Kern broke the game open in OFFENSE
the first half when he streaked 1$U FIZZLES
21, 16 and 12 yards on keepers
and passed 19 yards to Larry
Zelina in a four play series which
set up Otis' second one-yard
touchdown smash to move Ohio IOSoftSflPl
State ahead 21-0 at halftime. os e s b akSa
It took Ohio State almost the
whole first quarter to break the
ice. The Bucks needed to recover By MORT NOVECK just put everything together of- The Spartan defense also played
a Wildcat fumble and a 27-yardsjys verytgoeh o.aThepinekenso ruayed
pass from Kern to Bruce Jankow- SITo'hDail nfensively." well. The line kept Gonso running
ski o dive67 yrdsfora 7- led ?backward most of the time and on !
ski to drive 67 yards for a 7-0 lead EAST LANSING -Capitalizing THE HOOSIERS wvere able tok occasion he was dropped for a
on Otis' one-yard dive with 42 on his ability to read the Michigan move the ball into Mi'chigan State loss. Unfortunately for MSU,
seconds left in the first quarter, State defense and the Spartan's territory 10 times without man- though, Gonso was able to g e t
M* inability to move 'the ball, Indiana aging to score a touchdown. They the ball away while runnning from.
Boilermakers roll quarterback Harry Gonso led the did however, manage to salvage Rich Saul and company.
Hoosiers to a 16-0 victory yester- field goals out of three of the Ohio State
CHAMPAIGN - Purdue's day in a game marked by fumbles drives, a new Indiana record. The MSU however, was successful rdue
some offensive machine caught up and stalled drives lone Indiana touchdown was scored in stopping the Hoosiers once they u
with winless but inspired Illinoistgot into Spartan territory They MICHIGAN
yesterday and smashed out a 49-. Indiana coach Johnny Pont by Lr Highbaugh on a punt also kept them jumping. Gonso Indiana
22 Big Ten football victory, Praised his quarterback after the Hatu back 43 ise rcomplimented them after the Wisconsin
The Illini took leads of 12-7 game sayig, Harry did a g vided most of the Indiana punc game saying, "State hits harder Northwestern
and 19-14 in the first half but Ob of reading the MSU defense. on the ground. He gained 152 yards than anyone else. Seeing all those Iowa
simply couldn't contain Mike in 25 carries and set a new Hoosier Michigan State
Phipps and his romping comrades ?the plays lhe called were audibles, ring carrsad wtseftal a r dosetriedmwhnIithefl.
full 6n mits. mcalled after the teams had lined rushing recod with 782 total yards They really keep you on your Minnesota
a full 60 minutes. Imso far this season, but was unable , rIllinoiso
* * up at scrimmage. toes.

Big Ten Standings

ans

16-=0

Gridde Pickings
Michigan 35, Wisconsin 7
Purdue 45, Illinois 22
Indiana 16, Michigan State 0
Ohio State 35, Northwestern 6
Minnesota 35, Iowa 0
Dartmouth 42, Yale 21
West. Virginia 7, Kentucky 6
Tennessee 17, Georgia 3
Southern Cal 14, California 9
Florida State 20. South Carolina 19
Missouri 41, Kansas State 38
Mississippi 26, I.SU 23
Nebraska 20, Colorado 7
Oklahoma State 28, Kansas 26
Auburn 38, Florida 12
Georgia '[ech 20, Duke 7
Houston 38, Miami 36
North C'arolina 12, Virgiiaz0
Pittsburgi 1,. Syracuse 20
Daily Libels at webn. inc.
East
Cornell 10, 'olumbia 3
llarard: 20, Pennsylvania 6
P'enn St ate 38.,IBost on College 16

Princeton 33, Brown 6
Delaware 44, Rutgers 0
Colgate 14, Lehigh 14, tie
Air Force 13, Army 6
:MidwestI
Notre Dame 47, Navy 0
Toledo 14, Miami, 0. 10
Oklahoma 37, Iowa State 14
South
Vanderbilt 26, Tulane 23
Virginia Tech 45, William & Mary 0
Clemson 40, Maryland 0
Southwest
Texas 46, SMU 14
Texas Christian 30, Baylor 14
Texas Tech 24, Ri1ce 14
Arkansas 39, Texas A&M 13
N S A
Detroit 130, San Diego 113
New York 112, Milwaukee 108
Boston 131, Philadelphia 126
N 1H L
:Montreal 9, Boston 2
New fork 3, Toronto 2

Conference Games
W L T PF PA
4 0 0 164 34
3 1 0 145 104
3 1 0 113 59

6 0 0 268 48

All Games
V L T PF

PA

6 1 0 251
5 2 0 217

3 1 0
2 2 0
z 2 0
1 3 0
1 3 0
1 3 0
0 4 0

108
73
63
75
62
58
42

63
113
93
111
101
94
141

4
2
2
3
3
1
0

3
5
5
4
4
5
7

0
0
0
0
0
1
0

187
124
79
181
140
133
92

188
120
140
238
212
207
169
219
245

opher's upset Ha wks Although the Indiana offense
displayed an aversion to crossing
IOWA CITY-Minnesota's Walt the goal line, the Hoosiers proved
Bowser smothered Iowa's vaunted that they could move the football,
passing attack with four inter- racking up 30 first downs and 479
ceptions while fullback Jim Car- yards. Pont was pleased with the
ter's running jelled the previously display stating, "For the first time
winless Gopher offense for a 36-8 this year, except for scoring, we

Hapless Wisconsin reverts to past form

(Continued from Page 1)
Due to perfect execution by the
Wolverine blockers, no one was
there to touch Pierson. He cut to
the left sideline and ran unhin-
dered into the endzone to p u s h
the score up to 28-0.
With about two minutes left in
the half, safety Tom Curtis went
back to cover Wisconsin end Mel
Reddick on a bomb from soph Neil
Graff.
Curtis, who hadn't made one of
his patented interceptions in two
games, jumped and caught the
ball with the ease of a Met out-
fielder and circled back 27 yards
to the 35. A frustrated Wisconsin
player tried to get an extra lick at
Curtis and the Badgers were pen-
alized back to midfield.

a little in the second half, giving
up 219 yards and a 30-yard touch-
down run by Badger second-
stringer Danny Crooks in the
third quarter.
After the game, head coach Bo
Schembechler didn't seem too per-
turbed about the second-half scor-
ing drouth. "I'm not writing off
the second half. But it's darn
tough to go out there when you're
35 points ahead and score some
,ore."
Michigan's Rose Bowl chances
remained about the same as they
did before the game. With In-
diana's win over MSU and Pur-
due's drubbing of Illinois, t h e
Wolverines will have to win the
rest of their games if either Ind-
iana or Purdue win the rest ofj
their games. Only one of them

ilusting the Bad gers

co get ie Ran across te goal 3ne.
It wasn't that the Hoosiers didn't
try to score but their offense ex-
hibited a definite propensity to
give the ball away. They fumbled
five times with the Spartans re-
covering three and Gonso threw
three interceptions.
WHILE MICHIGAN STATE
managed to hang onto the ball,
when they had it they couldn't do
all'ything with it. Coach D u f f y
Daugherty was visibly shaken af-
ter the game calling his offense,
"the worst it had looked in a long
time."
While he gave Indiana credit
for playing well he was stunned
by the final score. "I didn't think
anybody could shut us out," he
moaned.
According to Daugherty t h e
reason why Indiana was so suc-
cessful in stopping the State at-
tack was that, "They didn't re-
spect our passing game, so all they
had to watch out for was the
run."
The Hoosier's diagnosis was cor-
rect as the Spartan passing attack
proved to be totally ineffective.
Quarterbacks Bill Triplett and
Steve Piro completed only 6 of
27 for 53 yards. Triplett, w h o
started the game went 0-7 in the
first half.

FINAL STATISTI
November 1, 1968
Ml
FIRST DOWNS

Cs
9s

ICII
15

Rushing 9
Passing 6
Penaltv 0
TOTAL NO. OF RUSHES 51
NET YDS. - Rushing 263
Passing 86
FORWARD PASSES
ATTEMPTED I17
Completed!
Intercepted by 1
Yds. Intercep, Ret'd. 27
TOTAL PLAYS
(Rushes and Passes) 68
PUNTS, Number 8
Average distance 3>.1
KICKOFFS, returned by 2
YDS. KICKS RETURNED 88
Punts 56

H. WIsC.
20
8
10
39
89
218
40
?25
79
5
32.6
6
139
17

Moorhead
Betts
Harris
Hankwitz
MIantlich
Imsland
Werner
Thompson
Dawkins
Crooks

Passing
Att. Comp.l
13 6
4 1
Totals 17 7
Pass Receiving
Tutals
Punit inzg

Int.
0
No.
3

Yds.
73
13
86
Yds.
10
19
44
13
86

No. Yds. Ave.
8 281 35.1

IISCON SIN
Rushing
Tries Gains
' 16 51
14 38
2 33

Loss
8
8
0

Net
43
30
33

.

,"' ;

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