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October 31, 1969 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-31

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Friday, October 31, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poge Nine

Friday, October 31, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Support grows for

Wyoming blacks

11

Dunlap quits Titan squad;
Sonics Kron sold to ABA

LA
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RAMIE, WYOMING - Stu- letic Conference student lead-
s and faculty members at ers endorsed a statement yester-
Jniversity of Wyoming have day condemning "any arbitrary
d for an adherence to con- suppression of legitimate dis-
tional principles in re- sent and violation of constitu-
se to the suspension of 14 tional rights."
athletes on the Wyom- The statement continued, "We
football team. encourage the University of
a meeting late yesterday Wyoming to reinstate the 14
noon, the College of Arts black athletes if the above is
Sciences adopted a resolu- found to be the case."
calling for a statement of Meanwhile, the 14 athletes,
:iples to be used as the who were suspended after they
of a student Bill of Rights. wore black armbands to Coach
gene G. Meyer, Dean of the Lloyd Eaton's office before the
ge, said the resolution was Wyoming-Brigham Young Uni-
same resolution adopted by versity football game as a pro-
entire faculty at a meeting test against discrimination at
ie Faculty Senate Wednes- BYU, filed suit against the Uni-
afternoon. versity of Wyoming yesterday.
related action, the presi- The suit, filed in U.S. Dis-
of the Wyoming student trict Court in Cheyenne, ask-
and other Western Ath- ed for $1.1 million in damages.
joel block
The Wyoming 14
and athletes' rights

The black athletes also asked
the Court to reinstate them on
Wyoming's football team.
Each of the players asked for
$75,000 in damages for the loss
of their scholarships and 1 o s s
of earning power as potential
professional football players.
In addition, the suit, filed by
NAACP attorney William Wat-
erman, asks for $50,000 in puni-
tive damages against the univer-
sity.
The players contended in the
suit that they were suspended
for violating a rule that is un-
constitutional. Under the rule,
Wyoming football players were
banned by Coach Lloyd Eaton
from participating in student
demonstrations.
[The Associated Press re-

parted last night that Eaton has
relaxed his ban on player par-
ticipation in demonstrations. Ac-
cording to the AP report, Eaton
now bans demonstrations only
on the football field.
I However, Eaton has refused
to reinstate the 14 players, the
AP said, contending their pro-
test was in violation of training
discipline.)
Despite the verbal support of
student and faculty groups,
Willie Black, the Chancellor of
the Black Student Alliance at
the University of Wyoming,
was skeptical of the significance
of the resolutions.
"The resolutions have b e e n
favorable," Black told the Daily
last night, "but they don't mean
much until people start involv-
ing their bodies."

In an effort to obtain wider
support for the suspended ath-
letes, the BSA and an ad hoc
group called the "Committee
For The 14" have sent out let-
ters to several newspapers and
radio stations across the coun-
try encouraging those who sup-
port the athletes to wear black
armbands and stage "demon-
strations of conscience" on Sa-
turday.
Black also said last night that
support for the suspended ath-
letes Avas increasing on t h e
Wyoming campus. Several legal
defense funds have been estab-
lished for the players, and three
black members of the track
team quit the team and left
school in protest over the
suspension of the football play-
ers.

"In a way," Black comment-
ed, "this is the most encourag-
ing thing that's happened out
here.
"Up until now," Black con-
tinued, "the biggest thing here
was to have a good football
team. Everyone was willing .to
suspend the rights of black in-
dividuals in order tq have a
winning football team."
Black said the suspension of
the players has "definite rac-
ist overtones.
"The whole issue," Black con-
tinued, "is basically a case of
blacks getting a raw deal."
Black said he hopes the ath-
letic directors of the Western
Athletic Conference will discuss
the issue at their meeting No-
vember 3, 4, and 5.

KNICKS WIN AGAIN:

By The Associated Press
0 DETROIT - Dwight Dunlap, Captain of the 1969-70 Univer-
sity of Detroit basketball team, has left the squad for personal reasons,
head coach Jim Harding announced yesterday.
The six-foot-one senior from Ferndale, Mich., has been emotional-
ly upset since the death of his grandfather a week ago, Harding said.
Dunlap was a starter at guard for the Titans last year and
averaged 10.1 points per game.
The loss of Dunlap was the latest in a series of crushing blows
to Harding's hopes for success in his first year as Titan coach.
The former coach of the Minnesota Pipers of the American Bas-
ketball Association learned last August that Spencer Haywood, Olym-
pic star and All-American, was quitting school to sign with the Denver
Rockets of the ABA.
Harding had inherited a tough schedule designed to show off
Haywood. The Titans' formidable opponents this year include St.
Bonaventure, Illinois, Notre Dame, Loyola of New Orelans, Canisius,
Wichita and Pittsburgh.
Harding took a hard line Monday to quell a brief revolt by players
apparently critical of long practice sessions.
At the beginning of practice Monday, the players asked for a
meeting to discuss grievances. After the meeting, Harding said he
made no concessions . . . I listened to what they had to say, con-
sidered it and made no changes." He refused to say what was dis-
cussed and kept the players from commenting, declaring: "They're
not allowed to talk."
. SEATTLE - The Seattle SuperSonics, who obtained a court
injunction last week to prevent Tommy Kron from playing for any
other basketball team, announced Wednesday they've sold him to the
Kentucky Colonels.
The sale-for an undisclosed sum-was confirmed by Sam Schul-
man, president of the Seattle National Basketball Association team,
in a telephone call from his Los Angeles headquarters.
"Because we sold him to the ABA does not mean peace between
the two basketball leagues is just around the corner," Schulman said.
41LOUISVILLE - Good grief, Charley Brown! It just had to be
-on Halloween Eve-the winner of the ninth race at Churchill Downs
yesterday was Great Pumpkin.
Despite the fact the three-year-old colt was a maiden, it didn't
fool too many people. The fans sensed the drama and Great Pumpkin
paid $10.80.
---- - --- ---

I got a letter in the mail yesterday from Laramie, Wyoming.
It was a form letter but I didn't feel affronted because it had
a lot of important things to say. Here it is in its entirety:
TO: student newspapers for publication next issue.
RE: recent dismissal of 14 black athletes from U.W. foot-
ball squad
You have no doubt heard of the controversy on the Uni-
versity of Wyoming campus following the dismissal of 14 black
members of the football team. Because your function as a news-
paper is the promotion of free and uncoerced speech, we feel
that you should have access to aview of the implications of this
action other than that sanctioned officially by the U.W. admin-
istration. Here follows a synopsis of events leading to the
dismissal taken from the Branding Iron, U.W. student news-
paper.
On Thursday. October 16, Coach Lloyd Eaton received in-
formation that the U.W. chapter of Black Students Alliance
intended to protest, at the October 18 game, racial discrimin-
ation by Brigham Young University and the L.D.S. (Mormon)
Church. At this time Coach Eaton informed Joe Williams, senior
tailback, that if team members wore black armbands during
the game, they would be dismissed from the team. Williams
agreed to confer with his teammates and talk with the coach
on Friday. The 14 black athletes-dressed in civilian clothes
and wearing black armbands-approached Coach Eaton Friday
morning to discuss the extent to which they might protest.
According to Willie Hysaw, Coach Eaton submitted the players
to a 15 minute monologue which he began by saying "you are
through."
Coach Eaton chose to view the actions of the 14 as
a violation of two of his personal rules: 1) that players will
not form themselves into groups or factions but act as
individuals, and 2) that players will not participate in
student demonstrations of any kind. The latter rule is ob-
viously unconstitutional as determined in the U.S. Supreme
Court decision on the case "Tinker vs. Des Moines Inde-
pendent Community School District" (Feb. 24, 1969).
Eaton, apparently realizing the unconstitutionality of his
two rules, later made the following concessions:
After re-evaluating the coaching staff rule on dissent as
It relates to all students on campus today, we are altering the
rule so it applies only to players while directly participating in
team activities. (Memorandum of remarks made by President
Carlson at the Faculty Senate meeting, Oct. 23, 1969).
If we ignore the possible ambiguities of this statement and
assume it to be a recission of the rule, Eaton and the adminis-
tration have placed themselves In a totally illogical and un-
tenable position:
1) Recission of the rule disavowing the right of sym-
bolic protest is an implicit admission that the rule was
wrong and unconstitutional.
2) The 14 were dismissed under this unconstitutional
rule.
3) Punishment inflicted under an unconstitutional rule
is obviously an injustice and restitution must be made.
4) The 14 then must be reinstated to team status with-
out reprisal.
WHAT CAN YOU DO?
In view of the above, Saturday, November 1 has been des-
ignated "Support The 14 at Wyoming Day." We suggest sym-
pathetic groups on your campus take action in support of the 14:
1) WEAR BLACK ARMBANDS
2i STAGE DEMONSTRATIONS OF CONSCIENCE NOV. 1
Such support is imperative if we are ever to indicate to the
people of this nation that constitutional freedoms must be upheld
and defended as well as idealized!
Black Students Alliance
Committee For The 14
The issue at Wyoming is clear; it is the testing of whether
college athletes have the same rights to free speech and expres-
sion as other students and even as other persons in the society.
The status of scholarship athletes is a unique one in Amer-
ican society. He is similar to what Malcolm X called "the
house nigger" who received extra benefits (scholarships) from
the master (athletic department as long as he give the master'
his complete allegience. But if he ever became uppity, he would
be forced to go back to hard labor with the field niggers.
The analogy fits bothblack and whitetathletestacross the
country. It is the cruel fact in collegiate athletics today that
speaking out on contemporary issues is an impossibility for
athletes on scholarships. I've wondered why athletes haven't
banded together to assert their rights, but I suppose there were
others in the 1950's who puzzled about the apparent docile
nature of blacks in this country, too.
The Wyoming protest is an extension of the awareness blacks
have attained in their fight for civil rights. It may be the cata-
pult for athletes in America in their fight for freedom. Support
the Wyoming 14 by wearing a black arm-band to the football
game Saturday.

Aleindor leads Bucks bPistons
By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Lew Alcindor and the Milwaukee Bucks out-
scored the Detroit Pistons, 20-0, over a 72-minute stretch in
the second period yesterday and went on to score an easy 102-
81 National Basketball Association victory.
With Detroit leading 30-25 early in the second period, the
Bucks started their streak with three straight free throws by

Guy Rodgers and by the time
the Pistons could score again,
Milwaukee had built up a 45-
30 lead.
It was 50-34 at the half.
Although Alcindor ran into foul
trouble, had to sit out part of the
third quarter and finally fouled
out for the third time in his eight
games in the NBA in the fourth
period, the Pistons were never
able to get closer than 21 points.
Alcindor wound up with 23
points and 19 rebounds before the
crowd of 9,738. The Pistons, in
scoring only 10 points in the se-
cond quarter and 34 points for the
first half, set two dubious club1
records since the team was mov-
ed from Fort Wayne, Ind., in
1957-58.
The all-time Piston low was set
in 1950 when the club made only
eight points in an entire half in
the NBA's lowest scoring game of
all-time, a 19-18 Piston victory
over the old Minneapolis Lakers.
Flynn Robinson was the high
scorer for Milwaukee with 25,
points. Dave Bing was high for
Detroit with 21.
NEW YORK -- Walt Frazier,1
the sparkplug of New York's tough
defense, gunned in a pro career
high 43 points last night and led

i

daily
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL HERTZ

I,1

the Knicks past the Sani Diego
Rockets 123-110 for their ninth
victory in their first 10 gaines of
the National Basketball Asociation
season.

Frazier, stealing the ball and
playing a red hot floor game, got
himself free .for 28 points in the
second half as the Knicks stormed i
back from a 59-53 deficit at inter-
mission.
At the opening of the second
half, Willis Reed, Dave DeBus-
schere, Dick Barnett and Frazier
hit on field goals as New York A
moved in front 62-59 and neverY
was headed thereafter.
Reed, who left the game with
5:39 left when he was cut over AlC dor( 3 )bit
his left eyebrow, which required
four stitches, was second for New
York with 22.
Elvin Hayes had 25 for San
Diego.

I
tl

JEWISH PEACE FELLOWSHIP
"SHOULD A JEW BECOME A
CONSC I ENTIOUS OBJ ECTOR?"
SUNDAY, NOV. .12-12:00 Noon
at THE HOUSE
1429 HILL STREET
coffee donuts
DRAFT COUNSELORS WILL BE
GUEST DISCUSSANTS
EVERYONE WELCOME

-Associated Press
les with Otto Moore

This Weekend in Sports
TOMORROW
FOOTBALL--Wisconsin at Michigan Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
SOCCER--Toledo at Wines Field, 10:30 a.m.
RUGBY-Chicago Lions at Wines Field, 4 p.m.
SUNDAY
I OOTBALL-DAILY LIBELS vs. wcbn at Wines Field, 1 p.m.
Professional Standings

Nil L
Eastern Division
W L T P
Boston 6 1 1
Montreal 3 2 41
New York 4 3 21
Detroit It ?
Toronto 3 3 1
Chicago 1 6 1
Western Division
Oakland 4 3 1
St. Louis 3 C C
Minnesota 4 4 0
Philadelphia 1I1 4
Pittsburgh 1 4 3
Los Angeles 2 5 0
Yesterday's Results
New York 3, Philadelphia 3
Montreal 2, St. Louis 2
NBA
EastNDivision
W L

Pt. GF
13 27
10 29
10 23
9 21
7 19
3 13

GA?
14
24
26
16
15
25
23
19
13
20
22

San Diego 1 5 .200
Seattle 0 6 .000
Yesterday's Results
Milwaukee 102, Detroit 81
New York 123, San Diego 110
Cincinnati at Phoenix, inc.
Today's Gaines
Chicago vs. Baltimore at Boston
San Diego at Boston
Cincinnati at Seattle
Milwaukee at Philadelphia

9
8
s
5
4

18
22
23
10
16
14

E
Indianai
C aro ina
Kentucky
l'ittsburgil
New 'York
Miamii
Wt
w
Dallas
Los Angeles
Washington
New (Orleans
Delienpr

astern Division
> 1
1 I
4 1
3 z2
2 3
? 5
estern Division
6 3
4 3
3 4

3z:.
41:
GB
21;
31.
11:
31:

Michigan joins in the observ-
ance of football's 100th anni-
versary this week with the
selection of an All-Time Mich-
igan squad and player. T h e
team will be picked by Michigan
fans, so send your ballots in by
tomorrow.
All-Time Michigan Team
Sports Information Dept.
1000 S. State St.
Ann Arbor, Mi. 48106
The IM department is plan-
ning its pre-holiday basketball
tournament. There is a $5 en-
try fee and the deadline is to-
day.
(OMPUTA-DATE
"Finds People for
People"
CALL 662-4401

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New York
Philadelphia
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Yesteday's Results
1- tAnigeles at New Orleans, inc.
Indiana 123, Washington 121, o.t.

Joine
The Daily

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for MEN and WOMEN
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MASTER TAILOR
alternations and remodeler spe-
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SUMMit Comes Next
* Do you live in a Sum- * Because of pressure
mit building? Your land- from the lenants Union.
lord, like others in Ann Help keep up the pres-
Arbor is trving hard to sure in vo u r comoanv

CENTRAL STUDENT JUDICIARY
Announces ODen Petitionina

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