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October 31, 1969 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-31

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Friday, October 31, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

SLUi1iMER J+llB

Student joins Nader'

(Continued from Page I
miners struck for six weeks, to
provide disability provisions for
them. From the time it started
until it ended, it was a gratifying
example of working class mili-
tancy."
"The descendants of indentured
servants :populate Appalachia
they do not have a heritage of'
controlling their own lives," he'
continues. "I thought working for'
Yablonski would help inject somes
self-determination into t h e i r
lives."
Disillusionment followed, though,
"because the campaign did not
demonstrate the potential for
activising the miners that I had

hoped" and Bowers left
paign to join a study of
health and safety in
West Virginia.

the cam-
coal mine
southern

"It interviewed coal mine in-
spectors on obstacles to making
mines safe," he says. "We went
into one mine with such a bad
roof that one of the two eight-
hour shifts was devoted just to
clearing out the rock from roof
falls.
The summer experience with
Nader led Bowers to contemplate
the legal profession and. its basic
premises.
"Is a lawyer a public official or
a private employe?" he asks. "Na-
der examined the most prestig-

B3Sand T; Ho-hum. Alnsc
s raid er s -ontinue 'from Pagebecome, it is important not to for-r The AlumniASSOCation
phrasing was o f t e n the only get they have given pop musican0
uthing that could keep the band some great contributions-like the
ious law firm in Washington, together, which very frequently brass riff and some very new chord Homecoming '69
Covington got bogged down in some very structures as in "Spinning Wheel."
to investigate the responsibility ; standard jazz patterns. Katz, on Some people would go even
of a lawyer." the other hand, didn't get into farther and say that Blood, Sweat,.1 othi/thand, ! -n to)
Nader believes it is the prestig- the spotlight as much as Lipsius, and Tears has developed a new i dially irziies youto a
ious law firms that disregard their but when he did, he was over- field, that they have fused rock
public responsibility, Bowers says. whelming. and jazz. That kind of logic is D
"There should be a public body Katz's only vocal solo was hard to take, especially if you've 5 POST-GAME RECEPTION
to serve as a disseminator of in- "Sometimes in Winter" - a very ever heard any good jazz. Further-
formation about law firms to en- moving ballad sung over a brass more, BS&T's jazz solos are mini: or
able people to pick and choose obbligato - it was just the tone mal, and when they occur, they're
according to the attitude of the that could expose lead singer always the same thing played overH
firms," he notes. David Clayton-Thomas for t h e a fast walking-four beat. Lipsius -
Wthin the framework of Amer super Tom Jones that he is - and on sax and piano seemed to be the
l Nadr' k i dmir it did just that. only man who was occasionally
able. Bowers believr s, a -wanted more of Katz, but the y Thank you BS&T for your at- 1-4:30 to 6'3O
a didn't get it, at least not in that tack on psychedelic guitar music jNov.
He is a voice in the wilderness form. and thanks for two very good rec-'l
in a society whose leaders are Katz came back all right, but ords-and if you really do expose Aumni Assem y Ha-Michigan Union
obsessed with individual rather this time with his harmonica for new jazz textures to your audi-
than institutional violence," Ilethe encore number "And When I ences, more power to you ... may Friars Free Refreshments
says. Die," which is the best and most be next year we'll have someone
"The immediate contributions of ecentric arrangement of all. The like Miles Davis or Charlie Mingus
Nader are important-many lives song, written by Laura Nyro {who for homecoming._ 5 _In_ ___ ___
have been saved through his ef- Katz rightly plugged , is done in h r ",. <.;j3:;____,__
forts," he adds. an original style that comnes off C>3k.
"One of Nader's unique contri- souding like a jazzed-up cowboy
butionsto problem-solving is his song. Also, with such a, heavy
interdisciplinary approach. Most rhythm, it was impossible for Bob-
professions attack a problem only by Colomby's o v e r - percussive
one way, but Nader uses the drums to get in the way.
multi-pronged approach which is No matter how rutted BS&T has

Cit tax vote slated
Continued from Page 1)
revenues, Harris says he prefers the income tax because it is the more
equitable.
"The income tax introduces some progessivity - that's why the
Chamber of Commerce, the Realtors and the Republicans don't
want it," claims Harris.
"It's not more equity they want, it's more money," asserts Con-
nelly.
The opponents of the tax package say the 40-45 per cent of Ann
Arbor's residents who are renters will be in effect taxed twice.
The renters, say the opponents of the tax package, will not re-
ceive the benefits of the property tax cut, because their landlords
include the property tax in their rent but will not reduce their rent
if the tax package is approved.
Nevertheless, they say, the renters will have to begin pay-
ing the income tax.
The mayor concedes that the renters will be paying more
initially, but he believes that they will be better off in the long run.
He supports this argument by pointing out that a property tax in-
crease is almost always financed by an increase in rent, but he
believes an income tax would not similarly result in increased rents.
"Most landlords are getting a break on the income tax because of
accelerated depreciation," adds Harris.
Accelerated depreciation allows a large realtor to deduct from
his income 20 per cent of his property value each year for the first
five years he owns the property. Harris asserts that several realtors
in Ann Arbor buy and sell property to each other so that they can
take turns writing it off.
One of the income tax critics other major objections is that non-
residents of Ann Arbor will be taxed without an opportunity to vote on
it.
"Taxation of non-residents is taxation without representation,"
argues the Chamber of Commerce report.
Harris counters that it is a matter of charging the people who
earn their income in the city for the facilities that they use. "You
want to tax affluent people who live outside the city but who earn
their living in Ann Arbor," he says.
He admitted that very poor people who work in Ann Arbor
and live elsewhere must also pay a new tax but he says the tax they
will pay will be very small.
The most severe case would be a single non-resident mar who
earns $4,000 a year, but he would be paying less than $15 dollars to
Ann Arbor in taxes, Harris computes.

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necessary for consumer issues such
as air pollution," he says.
For example, there were anthro-
pology, medical and engineering,
as well as law students among the
Raiders.
While Bowers is unstinting in
his praise of Nader, he is not
1without criticism. The basic dif-
ference between Bowers and Na-
der is that between a radical and
a liberal.
"Nader's approach or changing
leadership of existing organiza-
tions is elitist," Bowers says. "The
power must be returned to the
people-such as the members of
the United Mine Workers-and
this calls for restructuring of
society as a whole, not just help-
ing elect more liberal union presi-,
dents."
"I arrived at the conclusion
that to wor'k within the system
{can not ultimately achieve the
goals Nader is reaching for," he
concludes.
Bowers himself is not "going to
do what the law school is pre-:
paring me to do." A radical law
firm or work in the Nader tradi-
tion are the first two alternatives
which come to his mind.
The work of the Raiders from
this summer is not yet done. They
are in the process of drafting
"heavily-documented" reports on
their summer's investigations
which will be published as a book
by next year.

VISTA

gets

Ghoulish

Meals

little support
(Continued from Page 1)
for example. But, then there are
places like Ohio State-There are
44,000 students at Ohio State and
we only gave out two appplica-
tions."
The recruiter did stress, how-
ever, that getting recruits has not
been a serious problem. "We don't
have trouble getting applicants,
but what we need is good appli-
cants. We need more mature stu-
dents, not those running away
from their own problems," he
said.
Recruiters indicated that thoseI
students stopping by at the SAB
were far better informed and more
interested in VISTA than their
counterparts on North Campus
and at the fishbowl. "People who
come to the SAB are generally in-
terested in applications," said
Tomezyk.
Another recruiter, Mary Crow-
ley, seemed disturbed by the "do-
mestic peace corps" image attached
to the organization.
Unlike the Peace Corp worker
who Miss Crowley saw as "a giver
of knowledge," she saw the role
of the VISTA worker as "helping
people meet the community needs
whatever they may be."

JUMBO '

I

vr

M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger of lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
pickles and ketchup . . .
ALL THIS FOR ONLY
49c
/ esMtLINGSfEArbrI
West of Arborland

t, ,t v f
.,
; ==

DeLong's Pit Barbecue
FEATURES THESE DINNERS:

Bar-B-Q Ribs
Bar-B-Q Chicken
Bar-B-Q Beef
Bar-B-Q Pork

Shrimp
Scallops
Fried Chicken
Fried Fish

Fried Oysters
All Dinners Include Fries, Slaw, and Bread

GO TO BLAISE'S
If it is good food Y'want, that is.
Himself Is Featuring
A BOUNTIFUL BRUNCH
All Y'can eat, of course
for $2.50
From 9:30 A.M. 'til 1 :30 P.M.
HURON at FOURTH
Res: Phone 769-2455, 769-3074

CARRY OUT

FREE DELIVERY

OPEN: Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sun.--1 1 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Fri., Sat.-1 1 a.m. to 3 a.m.

314 Detroit St.

665-2266

I

__

M*4t..

ALLIANCE FRANCAISE D'ANN ARBOR
DRAMATIC READING
OF POETRY AND PROSE
by
JACQUES DOYEN
of Paris
SUNDAY, NOV. 9, 8:00 P.M.
Little Theater, Pioneer H.S.
General Adm.: $1.00 Free for members of the
Alliance Francoise d'Ann Arbor
for information call: 668-8579 or 769-3578

with
Pepperoni
Sausage
Mushrooms
Hamburger
Green Pepper

rom

Ham
Olives
Bacon
Anchovies
Onions

I"GET
ATTENTION

GHEEK A NUT
IN T H E KITCHIiENF01' THANO'S LAMPLIGHTER
BRINGS CONT I YE INT AL EXCELLENCE TO YOUR
E VERY DINING EX PERIENCL AT
THANO'S LAMPLIGHTER
421 east Liberty-Seven Days a Week
(? >-"'><-" >o< ")-->;<?--" > O --><"""> t< ) "C<""_"> t-- ">0

OMEGA PIZZA
Open Daily from 5 P.M.-2 A.M.
FREE DELIVERY
Call 769-3400

P

discount records, inc.

i

Old IHeidelberg
211-213 N. Mafn St. 668-9753
Specializing in German and American Food
BANQUET FACILITIES

300 S. STATE-1235 S.

UNIVERSITY

IT'S HERE!
LED ZEPPELIN 11
ON ATLANTIC
and

LUNCHES, DINNERS, SNACKS
512 E. WILLIAM ST.
(Across from Tower Plaza)
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
5 P.M.-2 A.M.
NO 3-3379 or NO 3-5902t

i

Dancing Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Friday and Saturday Starting 9 P.M.
Serving Complete Dinners 11 a.m.-2 a.m.
City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays

M-.Oe

! /ZZEA IA '

TODAY'S THE DAY
FOR OUR ANNUAL
HALLOWEEN MYSTERY SALE
9:30 A.M. TO MIDNIGHTI
Our Entire Stock of LP's*
at Super-Low Prices

ACCUJTRON CALENDAR "AB" 14K
gold, waterproof,* sweep second
hand, calendar window. Gilt or sil.
ver dial. Luminous dots and hands.
$200.00
These are
not conventional
watches. When you
come in, ask to see
the only wrist time-

Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)
t r

For Fine
- ITALIAN &
AMERICAN
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
SPAGHETTI PIZZA LASAGNA
Featuring: Giant Italian
Sandwiches & Aged Steaks
CARRY-OUT SERVICE
ON ENTIRE MENU

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