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October 31, 1969 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sssteam heat-in winter months

HILLEL GRAD MIXER
SUNDAY, NOV. 2, 8:30 P.M.
at THE HOUSE
1429 Hill St.
REFRESHMENTS

By NADINE COHODAS
Radiator Reporter
Classrooms can be like grandmother's
chickensoup, an old philosopher once said.
They're either too hot or too cold.
If it's the former, you sweat to death
and the latter may just make you ill.
Angell Hall seems to fit this category
better than most campus buildings and has
a propensity to be hothothot when its
cold outside.
In September, early October, April and
May, it's not too bad. Open windows and
doors bring in some semblance of breeze.
But come late October, November and the
bonafide winter months, bodies of all
shapes, sizes, intellect and class rank are
in difficulty. The heat is turned on to com-
bat the cold, but unfortunately never seems
to take a rest until spring.
Consequently, classrooms become saunas
and during a scant 50 minute class studen.ts
feel compelled to peel off all the layers of
ipage three

clothes they so industriously applied before
setting a toe outside.
Naturally at the end of the h ur they
must re-garb to face the elements en route
to the next class, the library, the store
or home. Clearly a nuisance.
"There must be a reason for this nuis-
ance," you think to yourself. For those of
you with an inquisitive mind, the plant
department has the answer.
It's steam heat and its component parts:
radiators; both automatic and hand, ther-
mostats, leaky valves and condensation in
the pipes.
Most of the radiators in the classrooms
are automatic, explains plant department
worker Richard Stewart, a steam expert.
Thermostats are supposed to regulate them,
but he says that some of the regulatory
knobs have been removed because they
have either broken or teachers have mis-
used them.
Early in the morning the temperature

might be pushed up to heat the room, but
by the middle of the day the room would
be boiling, another plant department work-
er explains. Then someone else would set
it down low. Now the thermostats appar-
ently are set at the discretion of some
centralized finger in the heating plant on
Forest Ave.
Under ideal conditions, Stewart says the
thermostat is supposed to c o n t r o 1 the
amount of air going to the valve on the
radiator. The air should expand a small
rubber balloon inside the valve which cuts
off the five pounds of steam flowing con-
tinually to the radiator from the central
pipeline.
When the steam is cut off, Stewart says,
it builds up pressure in the radiator pipes
and h e a t is produced. The greater the
pressure, the greater the heat.
If a room needs more heat the thermo-
stat is supposed to release more air to start
See STEAMY; Page 6

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Friday, October 31, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

TON IGHT AT 8 P.M.

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SHOWS
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the
news today
by The Associated Prass and College Press Ser vice
ARAB GUERRILLAS blasted a Lebanese mountain fortress
yesterday and then were driven back from storming an army
stronghold, military spokesmen said.
Rashaya, which has been under attack for three days, could
prove a decisive factor in the conflict between the Arab guerrillas,
who want to use Lebanon for anti-Israel raids and the government,
which fears Israeli reprisals.
SEN. JOHN J. WILLIAMS (R-Del) claimed yesterday that
federal land worth more than $2 million was given improperly
to a group of Texans towards the end of the Johnson admin-
istration.
Williams urged the government to recover the property and told
the Senate that in addition to the land the Texans had received $8
million in loans from the Federal Housing Administration and nearly
$500,000 in Welfare Department grants to finance a geriatrics center
in Austin.
He said he has asked the Justice Department to investigate the
matter.
NORTH VIETNAM AND THE VIET CONG turned down a
U.S. proposal in an attempt to break the deadlock for new closed
session talks.
The United States' proposal would have restricted the peace talks
to four principle delegates and a few advisors. Both sides agreed that
no progress has been made in the Paris discussions and each blamed
the other for the failure.
U.S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge felt the proposal would help{
"break out of this sterile situation and promote serious negotiations."
However, Mrs. Nguyen Thi Binh, chief of the Viet Congs Provisional
Revolutionary Government delegation denounced the proposal as a
'maneuver' to avoid direct talks with her government.
** *
THE HOUSE COMMERCE COMMITTEE called yesterday
for a contempt-of-Congress citation against Chairman Rosel H.
Hyde of the Federal Communications Commission.j
Hyde had refused to deliver records of the FCC's license renewal
of WIFE-AM-FM, Indianapolis.
The panel's unprecedented action came while an FCC ceremony1
was in progress to honor Hyde, whose retirement takes effect today.

seize Ad Bldg.
Women seek own dormitory,
ask concentration program
POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. (M - Black girls from V a s s a r
College's Afro-American Society, aided by black male stu-
dents, occupied a portion of Main Building early yesterday.
They took over the administration section of the U-
shaped building and nailed the doors shut. The two wings
which house dormitories were not affected.
"We have stopped the school," said a spokesman for the
society, which claims to represent more than half of the 59
Negroes attending the 1,600-student college.
A spokesman for the group said

Vassar

blacks

VASSAR GIRL talks to self-appointed guards in a hallway of
the Administration Bldg. The building is partly occupied by black
women students inside.
DESEGREGATION:
Nixon backs Court

9 P.M.
Friday
and
Saturda
at
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7,9P.A
AND
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S oon
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BUDDIES in the
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9:30 on-$1.00 only
AT
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MS605 E. William
P.S. Halloween Party Friday

t
1
7

WASHINGTON (A) - After an
initial and uncertain response, the
Nixon administration pledged its,
resources yesterday to enforce-
ment of the Supreme Court de-
cision ordering an immediate end
to racially separate public schools.
President Nixon promised the
executive branch would "assist in
every possible way" to overcome
the "practical and human prob-
lems involved."
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell said
the Justice Department will use
"every available resource" f o r
enforcement.
And Robert H. Finch, the sec-
retary of health, education a n d
welfare, said his department is
"committed to the goal of finally
ending racial discrimination in
schools."
Before they spoke out, the
NAACP Legal Defense and Edu-

cational Fund, which won the
Mississippi schools case over the
government's opposition, began to
move ahead on its own.
Jack Greenberg, the fund's di-
rector-counsel, called fund law-
la-yers to his office in New York
City to start applying the princi-
ple of Wednesday night's decision
to pending school desegregation
cases throughout the south and in
parts of the north.
Nixon's statement, issued at the
White House in early afternoon,
ended an 18-hour period in which
the government said virtually
nothing about the court's historic
decision.
At no point in the statement did
Nixon say anything about prompt
enforcement of the court's rul-
ing. Press Secretary Ronald Zieg-
ler said he himself was at fault
for neglecting to say, while issu-
ing the statement, that enforce-
ment would be carried out.
In Mississippi the government
had broken with civil rights forces
and proposed delay in the dese-
gregation of 33 school districts in
the state.

the building would be held until
the college met their demands.
The girls said they wanted an
all-black dormitory and a black
studies program leading to a de-
gree.
Vassar officials said one floor of
Kendrick House on campus is al-
ready almost all black.
A black studies program was
instituted last year on a pass
-fail basis without a degree. It's,
an experimental program.
It was not immediately known
how many girls took part in the
seizure or how many male students
helped them.
The occupied section includes a
cafeteria, the school post office,
telephone switchboard and admjin-
istrative offices. Most classes were
held as usual, but the seizure cur-
tailed service in the occupied
areas.
Vassar's faculty met in the af-
ternoon with school President
Alan Simpson to discuss what toj
do about the takeover.
The demonstration began at
3:25 a.m. when the girls walked
through the front door of t h e
building and asked the night
watchman and switchboard oper-,
ator to leave.
College officials notified t h e
Dutchess County Sheriff's Depart-
ment of the occupation, but made
no request for police help.
Teboys inside the building
stoodewatch behind the locked
doors of the building and kept
visitors away.
Groups of whites gathered out-
side to discuss the takeover.
President Simpson, who came
to the 108-year-old school in 1964,
met with the group throughout
the day.

Pharmacy
professor
Deno dies
Prof. Richard A. Deno of the
pharmacy school died yesterday
morning from a heart attack. He
was 63.
Deno's specialty was pharma-
cognosy - the study of drugs
derived from plants. However, in
recent years he devoted his efforts
to pharmacy education and stu-
dent affairs. He was a member of
the Senate Assembly's Student Re-
lations Committee.
Dean Tom D. Rowe of the phar-
macy school said, "Dr. Deno was
one of the outstanding pharma-
ceutical educators in America. He
had made many important cpntri-
butions to the improvement of
pharmaceutical education both
here at Michigan and throughout
the United States."
Dr. Deno received his under-
graduate and graduate degrees
from the University and had been
on the faculty since 1952. He is
survived by two sisters. Funeral
arrangements are pending.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

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