100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 30, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday', October 34, 1969

I

BIG-CITY ELECTIONS

Police move

into

politics over

law andorder

WASHINGTON 14" --Police-
men, swept along by the clamor
for law and order, are moving
into big-city politics.
The trend toward police in-
volvement in politics is widely
evident, particularly in major
municipal elections this year.
Policemen already have help-
ed a detective become mayor of
Minneapolis. They are hoping
to help elect a sheriff as mayor
of Detroit Nov. 4.
Two incumbent mayors, John
V. Lindsay in New York and
C a rl B. Stokes in Cleveland,
must contend with police oppo-
sition in their bids for re-elec-
tion. Lindsay is a liberal and
Stokes a Negro.
"Police political power is both
considerable a n d growing,"
writes sociologist Jerome H.
Skolnick, "a n d its impact is
being felt throughout the po-
litical system."
"I couldn't afford as mayor
to be at war with my police de-
partment," said Arthur Nafta-
lin, who retired as Minneapolis
mayor this year and was suc-
ceeded by Detective Charles
Stenvig.
N a t was one 'eason why
N aftalin said he never pushed
for a civilian review board as a
buffer between a predominantly
white police force and the Ne-
gro community.
In Cleveland, where police po-
litical involvement is curtailed
by law, the Fraternal Order of
Police chapter took out an ad-
vertisement on the weekend be-
fore the September primary to
challenge the law-and-order re-
cord of Stokes.
Stokes won the primary but
the opposition of the city's
white policemen could prove the
difference if the general elec-
tion Nov. 4 is close.
Frank Schaefer, Cleveland
FOP president, said bluntly: "I
think a police department can
make or break any mayor and
I think the Cleveland police de-
partment is going to break Ma-
yor Stokes."
In New York, the ill effects
of Lindsay's repeated clashes
_ with the Policemen's Benevolent
Association is one reason why
Sanford Garelik. former chief

police inspector, is on the Lind-
say ticket as a candidate for
council president.
In Detroit, Sheriff Roman
Gribbs has the backing of the
Detroit Police Officers Associa-
tion (DPOA) in his bid to de-
feat Negro candidate Richard
Austin in the mayoralty elec-
tion.
Leaders of the Detroit Asso-
ciation helped form a statewide
organization they say has al-
ready s p r e a d to 38 Michigan.
cities.
The Michigan organization is
planning a rating system that
would judge state legislators on
the basis of votesuon police-re-
lated bills. It would also "eval-
uate" candidates for governor.
"People are beginning to look
for police advice," said C a r 1
Parsell, president of the Detroit
gi'oup. "They are more ready to
accept our opinion."
"We're trying to keep Detroit
from going to hell in a basket
like New York where everyone
moved out." said Eljay Bow-
ron, head of the politically in-
volved Detroit Detectives Asso-
ciation.
In Philadelphia. f e w doubt.
that Police Commissioner Frank
Rizzo could be elected mayor
next year should he want the
job.
Rizzo says he doesn't, but on-
ly smiles at the suggestion that
whoever wants the job had bet-
ter promise in advance t h a t
Rizzo will be his commissioner.
The emergence of police as a
self-conscious political force
has lent momentum to two sep-
arate drives to forge national
police unions.
The center of one budding
union is Boston, where Richard
G. MacEachern learned the
ways of power by building the
Boston Police Patrolmen's As-
sociation into a national mo-
del of police militancy.
N o w MacEachern wants to
create a national association
outside of organized labor.'
The other union movement
originated in New York City
with John Cassese and the PBA.
Cassese, who has stepped
down as PBA president, is try-
ing now to build a union affili-

ated with the AFL-CIO. A meet-
ing to draft a constitution and
by-laws will be held in Omaha,
Neb., next weekend.
Sometimes, t h e militancy
takes other forms as it did in
a Brooklyn, N.Y. court r o o m
where off duty policemen re-
portedly pummeled a group of
Black Panthers awaiting a court
hearing.
No policeman was ever charg-
ed in the incident.
Patrolman R o b e r t Paggi,
president of the Law Enforce-
ment Group, an organization of
500 New York policemen and
civilians, said LEG was unfairly
blamed for the incident.
"There was no LEG at the
time," Raggi said, "and we had
no control over the individuals
down there." He said there was
no proof they were even police-
men.
Some city officials see police
militancy as a formidable ob-
stacle to improved police-Negro
community relations, perhaps
the most volatile of all the prob-
lems plaguing cities.
A high-ranking Boston offi-
cial, who refused to be identi-
fied, spoke of the difficulties
the city encountered when it
tried to move policemen o u t
from behind desks a n d send
them out to fight crime in the
streets.
The transfers finally went
through but only after a pro-
tracted fight.
Another seemingly innocent
innovation - the use of name
tags on police uniforms - is
n o w before an arbitrator in
Boston. MacEachern sees noth-
ing innocent about name tags.
"In this day a n d age," he
asked, "would you like to go out
and fight Black Panthers and
Weathermen with y o u r name
written on your front for all
those creeps to read?"
To old-time police officials,
like Cleveland's Chief Patrick
Gerity, the new militancy is la-
mentable.
"A policeman is like a soldier
in the field," said Gerity, who
shudders at the idea of someday
having to explain an order to
a shop steward. "There's got to

be discipline and it's got to be
more than a policeman's per-
sonal desires in the matter."
Sociologist Skolnick, a pro-
fessor at the University of Cal-
ifornia at San Diego, studied
police militancy in a special re-
port to the National Commis-
sion on the Causes and Preven-
tion of Violence.
He says the danger is not that
police have become another po-
litical force. "The really dan-
gerous aspect of all this is that
they take a quite distinct po-
litical position."
That position, said Skolnick,
is toward the politics, if not the
person, of George C. Wallace,
the former Alabama governor
w h o rose to power in t h a t
state as an ardent segregation-
ist.

DOMINO'S PIZZA
One small item Pizza with
Coke for $1075
Offered to residents of: Markley, Stockwell, Mosher-
Jordan, Alice Lloyd, and Couzens
Good Only October 28-30
Call 761-11 11-Ask for the Special

WAITS UNTIL MA Y:
AAEA postpones decision
on student teacher issue

SPEAKERS!
1 ALTEC BOLERO-$120.00 Demo.
2 AMPEX-$50.00 pair
Tape Recorders and Decks
Viking 433-$195.00
Tandberg 12E-in portable case-$300.00 NEW
Receivers

(Continued from Page t1)
After the action by the teachers
postponed a definite decision.
the AAEA leadership introduc-
ed a resolution calling f o r ano-
ther meeting Dec. 2 at which the
teachers would "assess the pro-
gress made" in the discussion with
the University.
The motion would have bound
the teachers not to volunteer for
student teaching assignments in
the winter term of 1970 pending
the outcome of the December
meeting.
The teachers repudiated t h e
leadership once again however, by;
amending the motion three times
and substantially watering it
down. The December deadline was
extended to May, 1970, and the
restricting clause was removed, al-
lowing teachers to accept student
trainees for the coning year.
Lowell Beach, assistant Dean of
the School of Education said he
was "pleased with the action tak-
en by the teachers."
David Harrell, President of the

Ann Arbor Education Association,
was not pleased with the group's
action.
"This is going to make reform a
little more difficult," he said fol-
lowing the meeting. "It may af-
fect the degree to which the Uni-
versity is willing to make an ef-
fort to r:spond quickly and to
make necessary changes."
Jack Eisner, President of Stu-
dents for Educational Innovation,
attended yesterday's meeting. He
said afterwards that if teachers
and school officials and Univer-
sity administrators now begin tc
meet to discuss the student teach-
ing program, they should "serious-
ly investigate the possibility of
including students on that panel.'
Eisner also pointed out that
the University places nearly 42
per cent of its student teachers in
school districts outside of Anr
Arbor. "These systems ought to be
represented in any discussion that
might change the nature of the
student teaching program." he
said.

J
L
t
t ',..''......
1
i
4
a ..LI

.,,
}
,.,
:
:rc
fi
. .
'
ti

F.
f[[[M
4i Sy
4
S
1"
t
1
S
i
r S

;: L k
.1
{{ .' '
:1
1,'l,
. 1~1"
.
1 .
til
. 11 '
" . '. ±

N O

Electronice

1180-$135.00

Pioneer 700-NOW $199.90
was $249.90
music center, inc.
304 5. Thiayer
665-8607

44

I1

44

E

HALLOWEEN NIGHT MOVIE
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31

WHY WASTE TIME (LEANING 1
We Can Do It Quicker and Better
n QUALITY CLEANING
AMPLE PARKING
* OPEN 7 A.M. to 6 P.M.
EUREKA CLEANERS
308 N. Main St.

WAIT

UNTIL

DAtIK

UGLI MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
9 P.M.

__ a

3

_ __

Miss J plays the smoo1
in softie crochets by Tar
She's all sweetness and
in misty white separates
shell pattern wool croch
clinging a bit and letting
little of you show through
Scoopy tops, sizes 36-4C
Pant and skirt, sizes 5-1
Pullover top, 16.00
Lined pant, 26.00
Buttoned top, 16.00

hie
iet.,
h..
13..
I' 2 a

I' F BIGGEST
MUFFLER VALUES
G UARANTEED*
CUSTOM-COATED
MUFFLERS
Written Guarantee Buge
For as long as you own your MTerms
-t. . .. £ ~ - -

I fined skirt. 15.00

L-I1lr'u ohii L

L 1 /~

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan