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October 30, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-30

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A CHALLENGE
TO THE BIG BANDS OF ANN ARBOR
So You Have a Recording Contract
So Do the CowsillsI
BIG DEAL!
TEST YOUR T'ALENT
AGAINST THE BEST IN ANN ARBOR
FURTHER INFORMATION:
LUAC OFFICES, 2nd Floor UNION

page
three

4I,

Mfiripit~an

tii

NEWS PHONE:
764.0552

Thursday, October 30, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
SECRETARY OF STATE William Rogers defended U.S. sup-
port of anti-communist forces in Laos.
Testifying before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Rogers
expressed surprise that members of Congress were unfamiliar with
U.S. involvement in the Southeast Asian country.
In response, Senator J. William Fulbright (D-Ark), chairman
of the committee, charged the government with taking action in
Laos without proper congressional authority.
In a related development, Sen. John Sherman Cooper (R-Ky)
announced he would seek to amend forthcoming appropriations bills
to bar any military operations in support of local forces in either
Laos or Thailand.
FIGHTING IN LEBANON continued as Arab guerrillas and
Lebanese soldiers clashed near the Syrian border.
The Lebanese government last night denied reports that it had
asked for a 24-hour cease fire. The reported proposal had already,
been accepted by Al Fatah, the main guerrilla organization.
Palestinian guerrillas and the Lebanese army have been locked
in combat since the army attempted to reassert Lebanese control
of the guerrillas' operations. The guerrillas have used Lebanon as a
staging point for raids against Israel.
An Egyptian spokesman said last night, that Lebanon has agreed
to limited freedom of action for the guerrillas, if it does not contra-
dict the country's "security and sovereignty."
The Lebanese government's major concern is that guerrilla raids
might prompt Israeli reprisals.
GENERALISSIMO FRANCISCO FRANCO announced a wide-
ranging shuffle of Spain's government.
Franco, the country's undisputed ruler since the Spanish Civil
War, relieved 13 of the 18 ministers in his Cabinet. He also relinquish-
ed one of his two positions-President of the Council of Ministers-
to Vice President Luis Carrero Blanco. As chief of state, however,
Franco remained in full control of the government.

PRESENTS
IN HILL AUDITORIUM

JOSE LIMON
DANCE COMPANY
Sat., Nov. 1, 8:30
PROGRAM includes La Malinche -_-
music: Norman Lloyd; The Moor's Pa-
vanne -music: Henry Purcell; The
Exiles-music: Schoenberg; and The
Winged-music: Hank Johnson.
Tickets:
$6.00-5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-$2.00

THE ROYAL
CHORAL SOCIETY
accompanied by the
ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY PLAYERS
Tues., Nov. 4, 8:30
P R O G R A M: Coronation Anthem
(Handel); Eryiri - composed of the
investiture of Charles, Prince of Wales
(Alun Hoddinott) ; and Mass in C ma-
jor (Beethoven)
Tickets:
$7.00-$6.50-$6.00-$5.00-$3.50-$2 50

E

-Associated Press
Elevated by Franco
Adm. Luis Carrero Blanco, above, was named president of the
Spanish government yesterday by Generalissimo Francisco
Franco. Blanco has been Spain's vice president and Franco's
close political ally for many years.
COLLINS TRIAL:
Defense to present
ten 'alibI' witnesses
Ttw TV A KTX''lM A XT

Bid for
talks made
by Biafra
Ojukwu asks
parley without
'preconditions'
LAGOS, Nigeria (IA - Gen.
Odumegwu Ojukwu, leader of
Biafra, has offered to nego-
tiate without preconditions in
an effort to end the 28-month
old Nigerian civil war, author-
itative sources said yesterday.
The reported offer could prove
a vital breakthrough in the search
for a peaceful end to the war,
whichnhas killed an etimated two
million people through starvation
and combat.
Maj. Gen. Yakubu Gowon, the
Nigerian head of state, is ex-
pected to reply to the offer today.
Gowan indicated yesterday that
the federal government's decision
"depends on (whether Ojukwu)
wants a military solution or a
peaceful solution. The choice is
his."
He added, "We are speaking
from a position of strength."
The basic issue in any peace
talks would be whether Biafra
would renounce sovereignty.
Recent public statements by
Biafran envoys indicate Biafra
has softened its stand and is will-
ing to accept something less than
total sovereignty.
Secessionist leaders now con-
trol a 2,000-square-mile enclave
far from any seaport or interna-
tional border and virtuallywith-
out natural resoures. There is
little agricultural potential in the
hilly bushland, which is populated
by three to four million Ibo tribes-
men. Food shortages have brought
starvation to crisis proportions.
Ojukwu's offer was channelled
through Ethiopian Emperor Haile
Selassie, who was designated by
the Organization of African Un-
ity as go-between in the Nigerian
peace efforts.
Ojukwu reportedly made an ear-
lier offer but it was dismissed
by the federal government be-
cause it had not been forwarded
by Selassie, but by Gabonese Pre-
sident Albert Bongo.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
dayhigan 48104. Published daily Tue-
daythrough Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mal.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9 to 4:30, Sot. 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 1 12 hours before performance time)

FREE-Benefit Showing
of THE VIRGIN PRESIDENT
NEW MOBE CONTRIBUTIONS APPRECIATED
MAKE THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON A SUCCESS

The new Cabinet, which is closely alligned to Franco's policies, DY 1tl ZHJr ri1X
is expected to have a strong influence in the political shape of the The attorney for accused murderer John Collins has indicated
post-Franco period. the defense will present 10 witnesses who can account for Collins'j
whereabouts at the time he is alleged to have murdered Eastern
THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES passed a disputed bill Michigan University coed Karen Beineman.
concerning health and safety in coal mines. The 10 witnesses are named in a "notice of alibi defense," filed1
The bill, similar to the recently passed Senate version, would Oct. 22 by defense attorney Richard W. Ryan.j
require that mine operators implement several measures to purify air In a related development, Washtenaw County Circuit C o u r t1
in the mines,and reduce fire hazards. Judge John W. Conlin yesterday postponed indefinitely a final de-
The coal industry, in opposing the bill, has maintained that many cision on the defense's request for a change of venue for the trial.-
mining companies would be unable to meet the new standards and Conlin said the court would attempt "to get a fair and impartial1
would be forced to close. However, as a concession to the companies, jury" in Washtenaw County. He added, however, that he will grant a
the House bill gives the miners six years to put the provisions into change of venue if an unbiased jury cannot be found.
effect. i According to police officials, Miss Beineman was murdered last
- - - - ---------------- July 23, sometime between noon,
and 3:30 p.m.;
'OPEN DOOR CLINICS According to the "notice," three
of the defense witnesses will "ac-
count for Collins' presence on or'
O'' C tl at lenated eOunear the campus of Eastern Mich-
igan University between the hoursl
of 12:15 p.m. through 12:45 p.m.''1

THINK THE PRESIDENT IS A BIG LAUGH
RIGHT ON !
COME TO THE CAMPUS THEATRE AND DOG IT. PREMIERE TONIGHT

SEATTLE (P) - Behind the
weathered red walls of a tumble-
down building in Seattle's Uni-
versity District, doctors and
nurses are volunteering time to
treat and counsel alienated
young people on their own terms.
Eighty per cent of the youths
who climb the wooden steps to
the Open Door Clinic use illicit
drugs. But the ailments for
which they come to the free
medical facility range from drug
addiction to the common cold.
The patients say they want

nothing to do with Establish-
ment hospitals or doctors.
Neither will they accept medical
treatment from anyone who
criticizes them for using mari-
juana, LSD, amphetamines, or
other drugs.
The Open Door Clinis is one
of 10 such free medical facilities
in cities around the nation.
The Seattle clinic, started two
years ago on a stake of $87, is
the only which has been able
to operate continuously, its di-
rector says. The others are staff-
ed irregularly, depending on how

much money is donated to pay
for medicine, electricity and
telephones.
But the Seattle clinic faces
insufficient government funding
programs and pressure from po-
lice to provide information on
patients who use drugs.
Clinic director Al Weese says
clinic physicians do not file re-
ports with police on patients
who use illicit drugs.
"If we did," says Dr. John
Green, a member of the clinic's
board of directors, "the kids
wouldn't come near us."

The notice also lists five other
witnesses who "will place the de-
fendant on the premises of J & J
Cycle Sales," in Ypsilanti, from
approximately 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Two more witnesses, the notice
states, "will place the defendant
on the premises of Roy's Squeeze
In Restaurant from approximate-
ly 2:30 to 3p.m."
At yesterday's pre-trial hear-
ing, Conlin also said he would set
the trial date at another hearing
Dec. 17. He added that the trial
would not begin before January.

- U.

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HELD OVER
TheaA11e 4th Big Week!
Proqr.m Information 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
SHOWS C
TODAY LC
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What If
Someone Monumentally Incompetent
Became President?

e EVAN HUNTER

I)

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