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October 29, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-29

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 29, 1969

CONFERENCE GR UMBLINGS:

Officials, bow

CHICAGO (AP) -- Four coaches
have violated a gentlemen's agree-
ment this season and publicly
criticized football officiating in
the Big Ten.
This is the biggest package of
beefs ever aired in one season
since the agreement was estab-
lished 10 years ago "in the in-
terests of better officiating based'
on the premise that nothing is
solved by public discussion of it."
The violators are rookie Big'
Ten coach Bo Schembechler of
Michigan, Duffy Daugherty of
Michigan State, Jim Valek of Il-
linois, and Ray Nagel of Iowa.
Daugherty did it after the Spar-
tans' 19-18 loss to Iowa Saturday.
Schembechler got in the act in
a telephone conversation at the
Chicago football writers meeting
yesterday.
Daugherty said an official made
an "unforgivable" error by ruling
that an ineligible receiver, tackle
Dave Van Elst, was downfield
when Bill Triplett threw a 38-
yard touchdown pass to Steve
Kough. The play was nullified.

"Perhaps some officials are not
good enough to be in there. But
I'm not putting blame on them
for any losses."
Commissioner Bill Reed in the
last 10 years has passed out only
two reprimands for public criti-
cisrn. They went to Coach Jack
Mollenkopf of Purdue in a 1965
outburst and to Woody Hayes of
Ohio State last year.
Reed would not confirm that
reprimands have been given this
season to Valek, Nagel a n d
Daugherty.
"Let's just say we have been in
touch with them and leave it at
that," he said. "As for Schem-
bechler's remarks Tuesday, I
don't think they were necessary,
in order, or justified."
Hayes, whose No. 1 ranked
Buckeyes have a 19-game winning
streak, can find nothing to beef
about.
"But it is obvious from a study
of our and opponents' films that
officials are cracking down on in-
fractions and calling them clos-
er," he told the writers by phone.
' "And this changes coaches, plans.

VI policy
CHICAGO 03) - If Ohio State
retains its No. 1 football ranking
until season end, the team should
not be prohibited from going to
a bowl game, Buckeye C o a c h
Woody Hayes said yesterday.
Having gone to the Rose Bowl
last season, the Bucks are ineli-
gible to return this time under the
Big Ten's no-repeat rule.
'When that rule was put in, it
was a compromise that gave
enough conference votes to swing
a Rose Bowl contract," H a y e s
told the Chicago football writers
by telephone. "The situation has
changed drastically since then.
"This is the 100th anniversary
of college football and I think the
best team in the country should
be in a bowl game. If it should be j
us, we should not be hidden from
a bowl game."
Hayes did not elaborate further
after dropping the hint that if
Ohio State can't go to the Rose
Bowl, then maybe the bars would
be dropped to allow it to go else-
where.
"Ohio State certainly is not hid-
den," said Commissioner Bill Reed.
"The conference never w o u 1 d
give approval for postseason foot-
ball except in the Rose Bowl if
such a suggestion were initiated."

rapped by

coaches

The Mournling(
rIndy baas AEt e r

Schembechler said: "Officiating "This season we had a clipping
has not been very good, in my infraction called against us and I
opinion. They call penalties that I chewed out the official about it.
are not penalties. They call pen- But in viewing the films, I saw
alties that should not be called. that he was absolutely right. I'm
Officiating could be improved up- I thinking of writing a letter about
on greatly. it."

-Associated Press

SCC

ELECTIONS

Mike Phipps (15) wards off tackler

Reaves nears passing record

Your second chance
...Don't blow it Bo
SOMEONE, SOMEWHERE, in his ultimate kindness, g a v e
Michigan a second chance to earn a Rose Bowl berth.
Whether or not Michigan will have enough sense not to blow
it again still remains to be seen.
When the Maize and Blue knocked -off Purdue, Ann
Arbor started smelling of roses. After all, if Indiana lost to
either Michigan State or Purdue, and if Ohio State won all of its
games, the Wolverines had a clear road to Pasadena. Oh yeh,
Michigan also had to beat everyone except the Buckeyes.
UNFORTUNATELY, SOMEBODY overlooked the fact that
the Wolverines had to beat State. And of course they lost.
Michigan's thoughts of roses quickly wilted, and the Michigan
State News lauded their own Spartans and their chances of a
trek to California.
The Green Meanies, however, reverted to their own bobbling
selves last week and booted the game to Iowa. On top of that,
hapless Wisconsin came up with the upset of the year in knock-
ing off the Hoosiers.
Voila, Michigan was put right back in the position they
were in before. If Ohio State keeps winning, and if Indiana
gets knocked off by one of
the same two as before, the
Woverines can start packing
again.
Oh yeah, they still have to
beat everyone except O h i o
State.
This time, though, no one
in Ann Arbor is making that
supposition. If the Badgers had
enough stuff to knock off the
Hoosiers too, they just might
catch the Wolverines napping.
And if Iowa can knock off
Michigan State, they too might a
give Michigan a surprise.
THE KEY TO Michigan's
future lies with its coach, Bo
Schembechler. There is very
little doubt that the team has
the potential to knock off Wis- lb Schembechler
consin, Illinois, and Iowa. The
only question is if that potential will be utilized properly.
Against Iichigan State, nearly everyone (including Spartan
alumni) were picking the Wolverines to win. Yet Bo brought
the team into the game, as he later admitted, "too tight" and
they outgoofed the fumble-prone Spartans.
Last week, he went to Minneapolis without two backfield
starters and mauled the Gophers in what was supposed to be a
close battle. But even here, the team had problems in the first
half when they were in Minnesota territory.
MICHIGAN HAS CERTAINLY made itself unpredictable
this season, mostly due to their erratic performances. If Bo can
settle the team down and make them play to their capacity,
they may deserve a western vacation.
If Bo is able to pull the team together, he would be only
the second freshman coach in the Big Ten to win a Rose Bowl
berth. Fielding Yost is the only Big Ten coach so far to accom-
plish that feat when he took over in 1901 and held all his op-
ponents scoreless on the way to the first.Rose Bowl game played.
He certainly needed no second chance to qualify that year.
Bo, on the other hand, has been given every break possible.
Ohio State, the terror of the Midwest, went to the bowl last
year and is ineligible. Michigan State, Indiana, and Purdue
have all gone since Michigan. Thus a tie with any of these other
contenders means the Wolverines get the trip.
Added onto all this was the recent "gift" allowed the Wol-
verines by last weekend's upsets.
WITH ALL THIS, and with the team Schembechler has,
there is very little excuse for Michigan not to qualify for the
Rose Bowl. And if Michigan State makes things even surer this
weekend when they have a chance to knock off Indiana for the
Spartan's homecoming, Michigan fans and alumni will certainly
expect Bo to do the rest.

NOVEMBER 10-11
PETITIONING OPEN
FOR COUNCIL SEATS
Petitions due Oct. 31

NEW YORK (/)-John Reaves,
Florida's sensational sophomore
passer, continues to gain on Pur-
due ace Mike Phipps, t h e na-
tional leader, in college football's
total offense derby.
Reaves, who has vaulted from
seventh place to the runner-up
spot in the p a s t three weeks,
trails Phipps by 82 rushing-pass-
ing yards according to weekly,
figures released yesterday.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

T h e 6-foot-3 Florida flash
fired f i v e touchdown passes in
last Saturday's 41-20 victory over
Vanderbilt for a six game total of
20. Jerry Rhome, the former Tul-
sa s t a r, had 21 scoring passes
through six games in 1964, when
he set the all-time major college
record of 32.
Phipps has accounted for 1,814
total offense yards to 1,732 f o r
Reaves, who also ranks No. 3, be-
hind Chuck Hixson of Southern
Methodist and Gordon Slade of
Davidson, in the passing depart-
ment.
Reaves leads the country with
1,746 aerial yards, but the pass-
ing placings a r e determined by
total completions. Only two soph-
omores in major college history,

Hixson last season and Billy
Stevens of Texas-El Paso in 1956,
exceeded Reaves' six-game fig-
ures for completions, passing
yardage and total offense yardage.
An injury limited Cornell's Ed
Marinaro, the ground - gaining!
leader, to 11 rushes for 30 yards
against"Yale last Saturday. But
Kent State's Don Nottingham,
runnerup to the Cornell sopho-
more the previous week, also was
hurt after just one carry.
Marinaro remained on top with;
a five-game total of 873 yards.
Clarence Davis of Southern Cal-
ifornia moved p a s t Nottingham
into second place, with 826 in six
games.
None of the top six picked up
more than 93 yards last weekend.

* 6 FULL TERM

SEATS

* 3 HALF TERM SEATS
See MRS. SAMUELSON
SGC Offices, SAB

TOTAL OFFENSE
Games Puys

RUSHING OFFENSE
GamnesRushes

1. Phipps, Purdue
2. Reaves, Florida
3. Richards, Richm'd
4. Plunkett, Stanford
5. Dummit, UCLA '
6. Ramsey, N. Tex St.
7. Slade, Davidson
8. Ilixson, aSIU .
9. Manning, :Miss.
1Q. Shaw, San Diego St.J

6 254

6
6
6
7
6
6
6
s
s

219
290
225
201
253
234
270
233
165

Yds.
1,814
1,732
1,637
1,553
1,534
1,451
1,399
1,383
1,381
1,375

1. Marinaro, Cornell
2. Davis, So. Cal.
3. Nottingham, Kent St
4. Moore, Missouri
5. Anderson, Col.
6. Moore, Army
7. Thompson, Wise.
8. McCutcheon, Col. St.
9) Strong, Houston
10. Helmnan, Virginia

t. '
i
. !

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
10.

Hixson, SMU
Slade, Davidson
Reaves, Florida
Ramsey, N. Texas St.
Plunkett, Stanford
Olson, Idaho
Richards, Richmond
Dickey, Kansas St.
Phipps, Purdue
Policastro, Rutgers

FORWARD PASSING
Games Att.
6 217
6 188
6 203
6 235
6 197
6 229
6 226
6 181
6 183
6 162

Com
131
126
118
117
114
112
109
104
103
100

5 156
6 169
7 182
6 149
6 144
6 105
6 141
6 110)
5 84
6 148
. Pet.
.604
.670
.581
.498
.579
.489
.482
.575
.563
.617

Yds.
873
826
823
760
704
682
646
642
641
637
Yds,
1,499
1,410
1,740
1,577
1,500
1,420
1,512
1,255
1,590
1,140

::

Try Daily Classifieds

7

vnal-=

"Safety belts? Not if
I'm just going down to
the supermarket."
-Kathleen Farrell
(1943.1968)
"Safety belts? They
just make me nervous.
Besides, they wrinkle
your clothes."
-Louis Claypool
(1931.1968)
"Who can ever
remember to use the
darned things?"
-Gordon Fenton
(1921.1968)
What's your excuse?

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