100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JOIN US
FOR
TWO WEEKS SKIING
IN
INNSBRUCK
AUSTRIA
$419
Includes:
* 2 Meals Daily
* Hotel Accommodations
0 Round Trip Jet
Air Fare
0 50% Discount on
Ski Tows
* Opportunity to
Go to Neighboring
Countries
Round trip air fare to
Munich also available
CONTACT:
Ronne Babcock-483-7803
Ruth EiIs-483-7803
Kim Mobley-483-2992

LAST 2 DAYS
"It's the best
picture about
young people
I have seen!"
-John T.~ch, ABC-TV
Emanuel L.Wolf presents
AN ALLIED ARTISTS FILM
A Frank Perry-Alsid Production
IR U*N kCoPMD o! Al p4AtTAoMA,-

McGovern asks new priorities

By STEVE KOPPMAN
"We need to apply the les-
sons of the Vietnam War - the
darkest hour in o u r national
history - to the construction of
a new foreign policy," Sen.
George McGovern (D-S.D.) told
some 3000 people at Hill Aud.
Sunday.
"We must cease being a solo
policeman in a revolutionary
world," declared McGovern, a
candidate for t h e Democratic
presidential nomination in 1968.
"We don't have the right or the
capacity to try to save political
regimes that lack t h e respect
and confidence of their o w n
people."
Calling the Oct. 15 morator-
ium an "act of the highest pa-
triotism," M c G o v e r n said,
"when one challenges the mis-

taken policies of his country, he
pays it the highest possible
compliment. What he is saying
by this constructive criticism is
that he has faith in the high
ideals of his country."
McGovern expressed his hope
that President Nixon's Nov. 3
national address would signal a
"breakthrough". toward a policy
shift.
"But if he holds to that same
course," he continued, "I pre-
dict he's going to learn what
his predecessor learned - that
American foreign policy c a n-
not be formed in defiance of
the conscience and the common
sense of the American people."
McGovern also lashed out at
the national priorities, which he
said, assign vast amount to mil-
itary spending and relatively

little to social welfare. "We
have to develop a new defini-
tion of national security. We
must stop permitting the econ-
omy of d e a t h to starve the
economy of life," he added.
McGovern was optimistic that
the American people and gov-
ernment could learn from past
mistakes in Vietnam, but voic-
ed fear that "we're involved in
a similar course in Laos and
Thailand."
McGovern said that America
is coming to realize and work
toward the solution of her in-
ternal problems. Noting that
"we have 12 to 15 million hun-
gry people in this country," he
explained, "more people are
concerned about this, and more
people are willing to act on it
than at any other time since

I've been in public office."
Expressing a similar hope in
the possibility of change in the
electoral process, M c G o v e r n
said, "Out of the turbulence and
tragedy of last year's Democrat-
ic convention was born a re-
form effort that I fully believe
will bring about important
changes in the Democratic par-
tY"
"Racism is still w it h us,"
continued McGovern, describ-
ing it as "the most tragic moral
failure of this country."
"Is it not t r u e," he asked,
"that an increasing number of
Americans are coming to un-
derstand that not a single per-
son in this country can be real-
ly free and secure until we put
an end to the ravages of rac-
ism.

-Daily-Jim Diehl
The Senator speaks at Hill

lrage th~ree

x4c

Sfr41~IrnW

&UII

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, October 28, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

ENDING WEDNESDAY
CAMPUS

the-
news today
b) The Associated Press and College Press Service

Pentagon
to close
307 bases

3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor

SHOW TIMES
Wed., Sat., Sun.
1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
Man., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
6:30-9:15

NOW SHOWING
I NOW AT POPULAR PRICES!
Broadway's smash musical now the most exciting movie in years!
_$E CA TY

Wednesday & Thursday
October 29th and 30th

4:10 P.M.

THE SUPREME COURT recessed without ruling on the
Mississippi desegregation case.C b
The court was requested to determine the legality extending the backs provide
deadline for desegregating 30 Mississippi school districts.
annual savings
In other action, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall or-
dered the release of Rev. James Groppi, the Milwaukee civil rights *of$609 million
leader, until the High Court rules in his case. This ruling of freedom
on bail went against the state of Wisconsin's ruling that Groppi is WASHINGTON (A- The
"prone to abuse his freedom." Pentagon announced yester-
The Court also agreed to review a federal law that requires day t h a t 307 more militaryE
mailers to stop sending "obscene" advertisements to people who do'bases in the United States
not want to receive them. In addition, the Court agreed to decide and abroad will be shut downI
how long law enforcement officers may hold personal property as or reduced to save about $609
evidence while applying for a search warrant.
* -million a year.
GENERAL ELECTRIC was crippled by a nationwide walkout The actions affect Army, Navy
of 97 per cent of its employes. and Air Force installations in 42
states, Puerto Rico and an as yet
As the 147,000 persons struck, negotiations between the company undisclosed number of countries
and union officials were deadlocked over a wage dispute. The AFL- overseas.
CIO and United Electrical Workers have demanded a 90 cents an hour Details will be announced of-
boost in a 30 month contract with provisions for a 50 cents and hour ficially Wednesday morning,
increase for special skills. When the shutdowns, reductions
GE turned down a proposal for binding arbitration as company - and consolidations are completed,
officials feared third party intervention in GE's crucial long-term the Pentagon said, there will bel
decisions would threaten the employes' welfare. 37,800 fewer military positions and:
The strike, the first against GE in 23 years, may imperil U.S 27,000 fewer civilian jobs.
defense work as 20 per cent of GE's annual production is concernedBase closings have been a feat-
s k as 2 per ure of Demoratic and Republicanl
with defense operations, administration economy drives for
Although there were some arrests and scuffling in some New York nearly 10 years.
plants, the overall strike was reported peaceful. The latest batch of cutbacks'

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
THELOV ER
by HAROLD PINTER
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
ADMISSION FREE
CINEMA....I.D
Is
Petitioning Members
on
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 28, 29, 30
SIGN UP NOW-Outside Room 2528 S A B.

* * *
NORTH VIETNAM may release the names of U.S. war pris-
oners and open correspondence between the men and their
families.
David Dellinger, an organizer of the National Mobilization Com-
mittee to End the War, told Chicago newsmen that "it might be some
time before this takes place." Dellinger, a defendant in the Chicago 8
conspiracy trial, said Hanoi is "adamant that this information be
handled only by peace groups such as the Mobilization Committee."
Dellinger added that "it may be necessary for someone to go to
Paris again before the information, will be released."

follows a series of economy cuts in
the size of the Army, the strength
of the Navy and Air Force, and!
slashes in a number of weapons
and hardware projects.
The Pentagon is under orders
from President Nixon to find $3
billion in savings this fiscal year.
Until yesterday's base-reduction
move, Laird had been able to
muster only about $1.7 billion of
this while reducing the rank of the

-As7ociaed Pres
And the search goes on
Soldiers pass bricks hand to hand in hunting for earthquake
victims in Banja Luka, Yugoslavia. Fifteen persons were found
dead in the rubble of collapsed buildings in Banja's second earth-
quake in two days.
-- - --- - - - - - -
SYMPOSIUM HELD:
Doctors, poesr
discuss medCalcr

By JASON STEINMAN

is pr
the fol

NESS STAFF
roud to announce
lowing appointments:

* *1armed forces by about 220,0001
AN EARTHQUAKE rocked a Yugoslavia city for the second men.
consecutive day. It is uncertain how much of the
At least 20 persons were killed and 60 per cent of the buildings $609 million annual saving from
were leveled or damaged in Banja Luka yesterday and Sunday. Homes, the base closings and reductions
stores and office buildings crashed to the crowd in virtually every will be realized this fiscal year,
which ends next June 30.
section of this city of 65,000 situated about 160 miles west of Belgrade. History shows that the actual
The quakes had left the city without water and power and des- shutdowns of bases have taken
perately short of food, drugs and blankets.. many months, and even years,
- from the time announcements are
made. This is because Pentagon
authorities have attempted to
nsoften the blows of base-closings
-alyon local economies by trying to
bring in new industries and to find
60-6 0 O-OTD replacement jobs for dismissed
- civilian workers.
Christmas 1969 RADICAL FILM SERIES

The low quality of American'
medical care and the role of med-
ical schools in improving it was
discussed at Saturday's medical
symposium by a group of doctors,
professors and students.
Paul Lowinger, chief of the Out-
patient Service at Detroit's Lafay-
ette Clinic, and a professor at
Wayne State University, criticized'
medical practices in many cities
for racial discrimination, maldis-
tribution of medical personnel and
the dehumanization of American
medical treatments.
He said that medical schools-
by establishing open admissions
and abolishing grades-could help
humanize and individualize the
profession.
Mike Dawson '71, president of
the Michigan chapter of the Stu-I
dent Amerian Medical Association,
(SAMA) noted that since "5000 of

10,000 qualified students are turn-'
ed down by schools, when people'
complain of minority discrimina-
tion, I get a twinge thinking of
people more qualified who will not
get the chance for medical school
and will have to take less gratify-
ing positions in society."
Lowinger later said that "any
effort to organize with the AMA
(American Medical Association) is
futile. It is an accretion of in-
dividuals keyed to self-preserva-
tion. I also do not think any med-j
ical school will act" he added.
Dr. Harold Falls, professor of
opthamology, r a i s e d objection
from the audience to Lowinger's
comments. "I would like to see a
discussion with the ideas of actual
practitioners, social workers and
people with expertise and experi-
ence in a university setting instead
of purely utopian thought. Let's
please find out what we are chang-
ing from before we change."

Lebanese
map talk
strate irese
Political, military
le(aers prepare
to meet guerrillas
BEIRUT M - - Lebanon's
political and military leaders
mapped strategy yesterday in
preparation for talks w i t h
guerrillas over the recent
conflict in the Middle East.
Tension eased in most of Le-
banon's cities after the weekend
battles which left some 30 dead
and scores wounded. However,
fighting. ensued in the port city
of Tripoli, still in the grips of
insurgent guerrillas. Al Fatah,
the Arab guerrilla organization,
reported new fighting with Le-
banese troops in Southern Le-
banon.
Lebanese President Ch arles
Helou conferred with outgoing
Premier Rashid Karami, t h e
commander in chief and chief of
staff of the army, and his top
political advisers in advance of
Karami's expected departure for
Cairo for talks with the guerrilla
leadership. He will be accompan-
ied by military chiefs, sources
said.
The talks are being sponsored
by Egypt. A personal envoy of
Egyptian President Gamal Ab-
del Nasser has been touring Arab
capitals to arrange negotiations.
Lebanon says publicly it sup-
ports Palestinian resistance move-
ments but wants operations
against Israel coordinated w i t h
the Lebanese army. Such opera-
tions must not expose its popu-
lation to Israeli reprisals, the Le-
banese say. But Lebanese offic-
ials do not say how such opera-
tions could be carried out in a
way that would avoid Israeli re-
taliation.
The guerrilas demand complete
freedom of operation anywhere
along the twisting, rugged border
with Israel.
Some observers foresaw a pos-
sible compromise that w o u 1 d
allow the guerrillas to operate
only from deserted areas in
southeastern Lebanon. Still ano-
ther alternative was suggested by
Shibli Aryan, a leftist politician
who proposed a "Lebanese Ho Chi
Minh trail" leading from Syria
through Lebanon into Israel,
Meanwhile, in Washington, the
State Department accused t h e
Soviet Union of trying to "make
propaganda" of the crisis in
Lebanon and called for "quiet
diplomacy" to settle the dispute.
The U.S. statement responded to
a dispatch by Tass, the official
Soviet news agency, which had
been interpreted as a warning to
the United States against inter-
fering in Lebanon. The United
States sent Marines into Lebanon
in 1958 to help quell civil war.
The Michigan Daily, edited and nian-
aged by students at the univerity or
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morninog. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
|---- --- COUPON----

e* U
THOMPSON'S
a 7IZZA
U IA

BOB BURRELL--
Assistant Manager, Classified Advertising
JANET ENGL-
Assistant Manager, Promotions
SANDY FINSILVER-
Assistant Manager, Circulation
JIM STOREY-
Assistant Manager, Display Advertising
MARILYN WEISBERG-
Assistant Manager, Layout and Proofreading

Acapolco $399
London $379
Rome $399
Trip includes:
Transportation
Accommodations
Meals
plus all possible x-tras!
Contact:
EMU: EILEEN ELLIS
483-6100
RM. 817 Hill

PRESENTS
A Double Feature of
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
MODERN TIMES
add
THE CIRCUS
Two of Chaplin's finest social satires

TON IGHT
MEETI NG
8:00 3rd floor SAB

Wed., Oct. 29

7-9:30-12 P.M.

CONGRA TULA TIONS!

L

17

I

PRESENTS
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
JOSE LIMON THE ROYAL
ANCE COMPANY CHORAL SOCIETY
accompanied by the
Sat., Nov. 1, 8:30 ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY PLAYERS
-r.._i l . n .te

Admission $1.00
CANTERBURY HOUSE-330 Maynardj
Wednesday, Oct. 29
FREAKS
dir. TOM BROWNING (1932)

THE
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE PLAYERS
PRESENTE
AN EVENING OF COMEDY
Chekhov-THE BEAR
Albee-THE AMERICAN DREAM
TUES, and WED., October 28 and-29
University High School Auditorium

D

8 P.M.

FREE-.-

8 P.M.

ml

11

III

11

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan