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October 24, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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the
news today
b) The Associated Press (and Col ,e Press S ice
SEN. RIClhARD S. SCIIWEiEl R-Pa) said he will vote
against confirmation of Clement F. flaynsworth as a Supreme
Court justice.
Schweiker accused Haynsworth of insensitivity to potential
conflicts of interest and of violating the judicial canons of ethics
and urged President Nixon to choose another nominee.
IHe said if former Justice Abe Fortas was guilty of impropriety
or its appearance-both forbidden by the canons---then so is Hayns-
worth.
An Associated Press survey showed 46 senators planning to vote
against Haynsworth, 34 supporting him. and 20 still undecided. The
nomination is expected to reach the Senate floor about Nov. 6.
FOUR ARMY SERGEANTS have allegedly stolen what
could amount to millions of dollars from non-commissioned
officers' clubs.
The sergeants, appearing before the Senate permanent invest-
agating committee, invok:ed the 5th Amendment more than 100 times
yesterday during questioning concerning aliases, kickbacks and
other irregularities.
One of them, Sgt. Maj. William 0. Wooldridge, was promptly
stripped of his rating as a command s rgeant major. A Defense
Department spokesman said it hasn't yet been decided whether he will
be court-martialed.
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff,+ D-Conn., said the hearings showed
that "a conspiracy was formed and member s of the conspiracy real-
ized profit from their fellow soldiers.."
The- hearings will resume next week.
THE SENATE unanimously passed a bill to raise veteran ed-
ucation benefits by 46 per cent.
According to Sen. Jacob H. Javits H-N.Y. , President Nixon may
veto the bill because he might believe it to be inflationary.
Javits indicated thi t if Nixon does not veto the bill he will have
to cut federal spending elsewhere to balance the added expense.
The White House originally favored a 13 per cent increase.
OPERAT[ION INTERCEPT has been claimed a success by
the U.S. government.
The campaign to halt the smugling of narcotics and marijuana
from Mexico into the United States has successfully depleted the sup-
ply of marijuana in many areas of the country and where it is still
sold, it is of low quality and exhorbitant price, officials claimed
yesterday.
The assessment was made by Dputy' Atty. Gr. Richard G. Klein-
dienst and Asst. Treasury Secretary Eugene Rossides, who spear-
headed the guverminent crackdown.,

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Friday, October 24, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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PAUL NEWMAN
AS
HARPER
"Good, but not as good as How I Won the
War."--Stanley Kauffmann.
OCTOBER 24-25
Fri.-Sat.-7:00-9:1 5-Aud. A-75c (cheap)
OLIVIER'S
HAMLET

Daitii

OCTOBER 25
Saturday 2:00 Only
AUD. A-75c

Officials
s i over
draft case
(;iswold l'eftses
to sitzl Wbrief 0111
dIelinqu~ency rule
WASHINGTON (RP -- A split
evidently has developed in
the Justice Department over
the validity of the draft de-
linquency regulations.
Government briefs filed in the
Supreme Court on delinquency
cases are usually signed by Soli-
citor General Erwin N. Griswold,
third-highest official in the de-
partment, as well as by other de-
lartment officials. But Gris-I
wold's name is noticably miss-
ing on recent briefs.
When asked by a reporter why
he did not officially support the
government's position in two cur-
rent cases, Griswold replied terse-
ly, "no comment."
The cases test whether the
priority induction of young men
olho burn or destroy draft cards
to protest, the Vietnam war vio-
lates their constitutional rights of
freedom of speech and expression.
The cases also test whether the
draft regulations have been im-
properly stretched to punish pro-
testers by Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Her-
shey, the outgoing Selective Ser-
vice director.
Atty. Gen, John Mitchell ar-
gued in the briefs that tearing up
or burning a draft card is illegal,
whether or not the purpose is to
protest U.S. war policy.
He said such protesters are be-
ing stripped of student and other
deferments and put at the top of
draft lists not because they are
dissenters but because they a r e
violating draft regulations.
The delinquency regulations are
not punishment, he said, b u t
simply "compel cooperation with
the Selective Service on the part
of all draft-eligible young men."
Griswold, former dean of t h e
Harvard Law School, has signed
department papers in previous
draft cases and his expressed
views appeat o conflict, in part,.
with Mitchell's.
Griswold did not specifically
approve the reclassification to 1-
A of draft protesters, nor did he
endorse Hershey's October 1967'
memorandum counseling draft
boards to use the delinquency re-
gulations against young men who
engage in "illegal activity."
In an earlier case, Griswold
had said Hershey's memorandum
"appears to have invited local'
boards to undertake . ..reclassifi-
cation in a punitive fashion.
Against this background there is
a serious question whether the
delinquency regulations are being
applied in a manner consistent
with the Selective Service Act and
the Constitution."

Syrian rebels stage

raid

on Lebanese border posts

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JORDANIANS DEMONSTRATE
the Lebanese embassy to protest
guerillas.
MISSISSIPPI SCH1
GoeT rnm
WASHINGTONOP' -- T h e
federal government and the state
of Mississippi stood together yes-
terday in the Supreme Court and
pleaded for delay in further de-
segregation of public schools in
that state.
The government's recommenda-
tion of delay has produced the
first fissure in what has been a
solid federal partnership with
the civil rights movement.
Jerris Leonard, the administra-
tion's chief civil rights lawyer,
said the government shared the!
frustrations of black school child-
ren but believes it would be wrong
to further integrate without ad-
ditional studies.
Leonard told the court at a
hearing that the administration
has made some "substantial
breakthroughs" in desegregation
of schools in the North and the
South. but Mississippi presents
complicated problems that can-
-not be resolved immediately.
'-However, his argument that the

By The Associated Press
Arab guerrillas from Syria
struck hard into neighboring
Lebanon yesterday in retalia-
Y tion for a Lebanese army
crackdown against semiun-
derground commando forces
organized to harass Israel.
The guerrillas hit three border
posts and kidnapped 24 frontier
guards, military sources report-
ed.
Apparently carriedout with Sy-
rian government encouragement,
the raid by a force of about 300
was bigger than any launched by
the guerrillas agai'st Israel since
the six-day war of June 1967.
Al Fatah, the Arab guerrilla
organization, claimed responsibil-
ity for the attack in a communi-
que yesterday from its h e a -
quarters in Damascus, the Syrian
capital. "The Palestine revolu-
tion demonstrates its ability to
take any measure it deems fit to
defend itself and escalate its op-
erations," the communique read.
Evidently fearful of such
escalation ;the Lebanese govern-
"- ment ordered an indefinite curfew
on Beirut, the capital, and Tri-
poll, Sidon, Tyre and Baalbek,
starting at 6 a.m. tomorrow.
-Associated Press Lebanese leftist leaders have
in Amman yesterday in front of called for a nationwide general
Lebanese Army attacks on Arab strike to protest the army's
crackdown on the guerrillas.
Reports from Damascus said
Lybia was tryirlg to meditate the
OOLS:dispute between the guerrillas, who
want to use Lebanon as a base for
strikes against Israel, and t h e
Lebanese government, which fears
Israeli retaliation.
Lebanese President Charles
Helou said in a message to
Egypt's President Gamal Abdel
I e Nasser that his government w a s
engaged in a dialogue with guer-
:rilla leaders. But informants said
court should approve a delay un- the guerrillas insisted on a guar-
til Dec. 1 for the filing of de- antee that they be allowed to
segregation plans met s o m e operate freely in Lebanon before
apparent resistance from the they consent to negotiate on hard
bench. issues.
Justice Hugo L. Black com- The raids could not have been
mented quietly: "There are too accomplished without the know-
many plans and not enough ac- ledge of the Syrian government,
tion."dwhich closed its borders with Le-
The government and Mississippi1 banon Tuesday night and threat-
asked the court to resist an ap- ened "stronger measures" if the
peal by the NAACP Legal Defense Lebanese army did not leave the
and Education Fund that requests guerrillas alone.
the immediate implementation of While Egypt and Jordan spoke
the withdrawn desegregation plans yesterday of a compromise be-
in the Mississippi schools. tween the guerrillas and Leban-
Jack Greenberg, the fund's top on, leaders of Syria's ruling Baath
attorney, said Mississippi "has party led a demonstration of
been second to none" in frustrat- 100,000 persons through the
ing implementation of the Su- stretts of Damascus, shouting
preme Court ruling that racially "Death to Lebanese traitors!"
separate public schools are un- The' fist-shaking demonstrat-
constitutional. ors demanded the overthrow of
He said the rights of black Lebanon's army commanders, who
school children "should be de- were characterized in placards as
clared effective as of now" and agents of the U.S. Central Intel-
the court should strip s c h o o l ligence Agency. It was the biggest
officials who resist of "any pre- demonstration in Damascus in
tense of legality." 25 years.

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Desigted by JO MIELZINER
D17dMACLA INW

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