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October 23, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-23

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3rd WEEK0
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NEW1S PHlONE: 764-95523
.BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, October 23, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Students

question

UAC

ticket

patr

on age
amount of work the people on
UAC do. We feel that this is
one thing we can do to reward
them for the work they do."

TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.

For Information: 8-6416
4-U

TONIGHT at
7 and 9 P.M.
"The best .icture about young
oeoole I have seen." AB V

By TIM BRANDYBERRY
Most of the 130 students who
waited in line for an advertised
150 tickets to the Michigan-
Michigan State football game
last week were disappointed
when they found that a third of
the tickets just weren't avail-
able.
The University Activities Cen-
ter, which had reserved the
tickets 1 a s t spring, advertised
that 150 student tickets to the
game would go on sale Oct. 8 on
a "first come, first served" bas-
Is. But in fact only 98 tickets
were available to student fans.

And, d u e to an advertising
foul-up, UAC was caught in the
position of having to explain a
little-known but longstanding
policy of ticket patronage to
UAC members which had drawn
52 tickets off the student mar-
ket.
Wally Stromberg, president of
the UAC Executive Council,
said t h a t UAC had intended
from the beginning to follow its
usual policy of reserving t w o
tickets apiece for each of the 26
members of the Executive Coun-
cil, leaving 98 tickets available
to the student body.
"UAC members have always

had the option to reserve for
themselves a couple of tickets
to any UAC concert or event for
which we are selling tickets," he
explained.
When people began lining up
around n o o n the day before
tickets were to go on sale, UAC
members in charge announced
that UAC had set aside 52 of
the tickets for its own members.
Most of those in line, how-
ever, decided to s t a y through
the night and hope for good
luck or a change of heart by
UAC.
Linda Kruss, '72, who waited
in line all night but couldn't get

tickets, reported that approxi-
mately 30 of the waiting stu-
dents were unable to obtain
tickets and that a number of
others gave up and left before-
hand.
Miss Kruss was indignant ov-
er what she called UAC's "un-
fair tactics." She said she want-
ed to know why the UAC people
were not "obliged to take their
chances with the rest of t h e
general group."
She also complained about the
mistaken information in the ad,
saying, "If there had been as
many tickets as advertised, we

(who missed out) would have
gotten some."
Miss Kruss said she felt that
UAC should have given up its
ticket patronage policy at least
this time, since the advertising
mistake was its own fault.
Concerning the advertisement
itself, UAC admitted that it had
made a blunder. Stromberg ex-
plained, "They probably made
up the ad without even think-
ing about it."
Stromberg defended the pol-
icy of reserving tickets for UAC
members. "Yes, I think it's fair,"
he said, "considering t h e

Emonuel1. Wolf presents
AN ALLIED ARTISTS FILM
A Fron Pe.ryAl sd ProdCtonR
BACH CLUB
presents
WAYNE LINDER
smakinq on
"PROBLEMS IN PERFORMANCE PRACTICE
IN BACH'S CANTATA 152"
Refreshments and FUN!
Everyone Welcome
~No musical knowledge needed
For further information call
761-8356: 663-2827: 665-6806
I

the
n ews tday
b The Associaed Press and College Press Service
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION is reportedly considering
David O. Maxwell, Pennsylvania budget secretary, for appointment
as the next director of the Selective Service.
Informed sources say Maxwell has been under consideration for
several months, but so far his name has not been cleared with ap-
propriate congressmen. -
Maxwell at 39 is little more than half the age of Lt. Gen. Lewis
B. Hershey, who is being "reassigned" by President Nixon as his ad-
visor on military manpower.
CHARGES OF PERJURY and cover-up were made by Senator
Abraham Ribicoff, (D-Conn), as he closed his Senate investigation
of retired Maj. Gen. Carl C. Turner.
Ribicoff yesterday said the Justice Department will be asked to:
consider perjury action against Turner, the army's former top police-
man.
He said perjury was committed in connection with the inquiry
into Turners handling of 536 guns from the Chicago and Kansas City
police departments.
Regarding Turner and a sergeants alleged conspiracy in
the operation of military service clubs in three countries, Ribicoff
claimed that "extensive cover-up" within the army blocked investiga-
tion of those activities.
THE HOUSE FOREIGN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE appeared
about to chop the first chunk off President Nixons initial bid for
$2.6 billion in foreign aid.
Members have talked of a range from $1.9 billion to $2.2 billion
for the committees version of the annual authorization bill.
The unit has held 26 days of hearings to draw up its version of the
program. Chairman Thomas E.Morgan (D-Pa) has planned on an
end to the drafting today.
CHILEAN PRESIDENT EDUARDO FREI said that Chile's
crisis had been overcome and rebel soldiers would be tried by
military tribunal.
Frei told his people yesterday that the country would remain in
a "state of seige" until normality returns. He ordered a full investiga-

HELD OVER
3rd Big Week!
Proqram Information 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
SHOWSa
TODAY
9 P.M.

i

-Associated Press
SENATE REPUBLICAN leader Hugh Scott (above left) proposed yesterday that the U.S. unilaterally
proclaim a cease-fire in Vietnam. Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird (above right) replied that
such a cease-fire would not be successful without assurance that the other side would observe it.
Lairy first asked reporters not to identify him as the Defense IDepartment spokesman, but the
Pentagon later officially attributed the statement to him. Despite Laird's response, however, Scott's
proposal is certain to heighten the growing speculation that President Nixon plans some dramatic
move in his Nov. 3 address on Vietnam.
'TACIT A GREEMENT':
Laos expects U.S. defense aid
PARIS (A') - Princa Souvanna interview that the United States neutralist troops were attacked{

Stromberg added that he
thought t h a t students should
accept the ticket policy, since
the work of the UAC members
is for the benefit of University
students.
Jeff C o l t o n, UAC travel
chairman, also defended the
practice. "These people put in a
lot of work for UAC for free.
We can help compensate t h e
people who work for us by pro-
viding this service," he said.
Scott asks
unilateral
cease-fire
Laird cautions
against proposal
WASHINGTON 67P) - Senate
Republican Leader Hugh Scott
proposed yesterday that the Unit-
ed States unilaterally proclaim a
cease-fire in Vietnam, but Secre-
tary of Defense Melvin R. Laird
rejected the idea.
"I do not believe that would be
a successful approach," Laird told
a group of reporters. "As secre-
tary of defense I would caution
against a unilateral action on the
part of the United States without
some firm indication from the
other side that we would have as-
surance that they would go along
with it."
Laird spoke to reporters after
stipulating that he not be named,
but the Defense Department later
identified him as the official con-
cerned.
Scott said he hopes President
Nixon will set a date on which
American forces will stop shooting
unless attacked.
Scott, the administration's chief
spokesman on the Senate floor,
said he was not signaling any
White House intention.
"This is not a trial balloon for
the President," Scott said, "it's a
l.nrsonal hope."
But Scott's expression of that
hope, for a course long advocated
by Democratic Leader Mike Mans-
field, was certain to heighten spe-
culation that Nixon plans some
such dramatic move in his Nov. 3
Vietnam report to the nation.
Scott said he was speculating
himself.
"I wouldn't think anything could
happen of that kind before Nov.
3," he said.
Laird cautioned against specu-
lation on what Nixon will say in
his speech 10 days hence.
Both Scott and Mansfield said
the administration's new battle-
field policy of protective reaction
represents a major step toward a
cease-fire.
Under that policy, Mansfield
said, U.S. troops fire only to fore-
stall enemy attack.
"This is certainly a far cry from
the tactics of maximum pressure,
and search and destroy," Mans-
field said "and to me is an indica-
tion that the President is moving
toward a cease-fire and stand-fast
policy."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
,aged by students at the University of
SMichigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
lass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-

Friday
and
Saturda
at
1, 3, 5
7, 9 Ply
AND
11 P.M
Soon
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OLD TIME COMEDY FESTIVAL
friday and saturday-1 1 :15 p.m.

tion into the gunfire wounding of 14 civilians Tuesday night, during
what amounted to a strike by the officers and men of a regiment.
Frei replaced his defense minister at the demand of the rebels,
but said that in Chile "the people do not tolerate coups d'etat."
S - *
THE STOCK MARKET soared to its biggest gain in almost
six months in heavy trading.
Analysts said institutions and individual investors bought heavily
yesterday on the basis of rising hopes of diminished involvement in
the Vietnam war and reports that the economy was slowing underj
the restraints of monetary and fiscal policies.
MAYOR JOHN V. LINDSAY was far in front of Democratj
Mario A. Procaccino in the first installment of the Daily News
straw poll on the New York mayoral race.
The first sample of 3,000 voters throughout the city showed Lind-
say with 44 per cent of the vote, Procaccino with 33, Republican-Con-
servative John Marchi with 20, and 3 per cent undecided.
The News poll, which hasn't been wrong on a mayoral race since
it began in 1928, will add 3,000 more straw votes at three-day inter-
vals up to the Nov. 4 election.
THE SOMALI REPUBLIC taken over by a military coup
Tuesday is to be renamed the Somali Democratic Republic.
A radio broadcast yesterday said the new revolutionary council
would set up regional and district councils to work for the Socialist
development of this East African state.
It was also stated that all political parties in the country would
be banned.
THE U.S. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT filed a list of specific
demands for the desegregation of Georgia's 192 school systems.
The department yesterday asked that the provisions be enforced
by the opening of the 1970-71 school year.
The demands were filed in connection with a suit against the
Georgia Board of Education, seeking to have the board assume respon-
sibility for all school desegregation in the state.

h
i
i

Phouma of Laos said yesterday he
has a "tacit agreement" with the
United States that Washington
will provide aid to defend Laotian
independence, neutrality and ter-
ritorial integrity.
But the Laotian premier denied
that the United States has "in-
fantry" in Laos, adding "there are
only Laotian soldiers getting them-!
selves killed, not any American
soldiers."
Souvanna Phouma said in an

Collins' defense attorney
asks trial location change

"is only doing its duty" by "giving
us satisfaction." He just arrived;
in Paris from Washington on a
mission to obtain an increase in'
American aid:
The basis for U.S. aid to Laos,
he said, was an unwritten agree-
ment made at the U.S. embassy in:
Vientiane in 1964 after the Soviet
Union had refused to supply his,
troops with further munitions.
"It was not a formal agree'-
ment," he said. "In 1964 when the

and chased from the Plain of Jars
by North Vietnamese and Pathet
Lao pro-Communist L a o t i a n
troops, I had no munitions for the
arms the Soviets had given -me,I
and Moscow refused to continue
giving me munitions.
"To permit my soldiers to de-'
fend themselves, I asked the Amer-
icans to replace the Soviet arms
with American arms in the frame-
work of the Geneva agreements of
1962, since in the accords of 1962
it is specified that Laos can receive
conventional arms for its defense.
We requested arms to defend our-
selves, not to carry the war to our
neighbors.
"The United States, by giving
us satisfaction, is only doing its,
duty, which, according to the!
Geneva agreements, is to defendl
the territorial integrity of Laos,
its independence and its neutral-
ity"
Souvanna Phounia and the
United States maintain there are
some 48,000 North Vietnamese
troops in Laos.
The Premier was asked if he
thought the North Vietnamese in-!
terest in Laos was more than just
using it as a communication and
supply corridor.
"They must have some ulterior

By IRA HOFFMAN
Robert W. Ryan, defense at-
torney for accused murderer John
N. Collins, yesterday moved for a
change in venue, Circuit J u d g e
John W. Conlin said his opinion
on the motion would be announc-
ed Oct. 29.
Ryan argued that the extensive
publicity given the trial of the
accused murderer of Karen S u e
Beineman, an Eastern Michigan
University coed, would prejudice
any prospective juror in Washte-
naw County. His motion would
move the trial to another area.
Ryan presented three affidav-
its that exemplified his contention
that it would be impossible to find
an unbiased jury here.

Washtenaw County Prosecutor,
William Delhey disagreed v iit h
Ryan, arguing that of 200,000 peo-
ple in Washtenaw County it would
be possible to find 12 that are
unbiased.
Delhey cited a number of pre-
cedents that stated a juror is com-
petent if the prospective juror
"swears under oath that he is
not prejudiced",
Judge Conlin asked Ryan what
location he would propose that
had not been influenced by pub-
licity, should the court grant the
'change in venue.
Ryan replied he would private-
ly propose some possible locations
to the Judge.

motive of expansion, an ulterior cday through Sunday morning Univer-
sity yer.ubscrpnd mruens.Un1very
motive of annexation, perhaps in- ,casier.$10 ubscription rtes: $10 by
directly by aiding the Pathet Lao Summer Session published Tuesday
to take power. If that happens through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
Laos would become a satellite of tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
North Vietnam," he said.

- ---------

I

RESENTS

HOMECOMING '69

wk

presents
Homecoming. Dance

ORCHESTRA OF 'ACCADEMIA
DI SANTA CECILIA, ROME
FERNANDO PREVITALI, Conductor
TONIGHT at 8:30
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Program dedicated to the United Nations on the
eve ot-f the24th nnniver orof its foundin .

FRII
NAI

DAY, OCT. 31-9:00 P.M.
IM Building
featuring
PANAW'S POTTERY SHOP

*.,4 t~~- 4t I~*1 A~~k44 i~w -, ,~W -t' ~*~~~j'---

i

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