100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 22, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'HILLEL TGIF
FRIDAY, OCT. 24 4-5:30 P.M.
Grads and Undergrads
Welcome
AT THE HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.

Africian

group

to widen

3rd WEEK -
° 0 °__
se a
BARBRA OMAR
o Risa' *OTRIOAND- B A
O O O II )M
o o I
Matinee Today Tonih t
$1.50 $1.75 -

By LYNN WEINER
An interruption of the an-
nual convention of the African
Studies Association (ASA) of
the United States last week
will lead to the establishment
of a new black academic organi-
zation on college campuses.
The African Heritage Studies
Association (AHSA), a splinter
group of the ASA, presented- a
list of demands to the National
convention, including e q u a 1
black - white representation on
the ASA Board of Directors.
When the proposals were re-
jected the group walked out of
a meeting in protest.
According to University an-
thropology Prof. Gloria Mar-
shall, a member of the AHSA
and fellow of the ASA, the
AHSA is the first all-black

academic association concerned
with African studies. Miss Mar-
shall says "at the moment our
group would be intended for
black scholars. The ASA does
not deal with the particular
problems and needs of black
scholars concerned with Africa,
but the AHSA would fill this
need."
The AHSA proposal calls for
the seating of six whites and
six blacks on the ASA board.
The board offered three seats,
which AHSA members rejected.
Later the ASA agreed to study
restructuring the organization.
"There is discrimination with
respect to the fellows elected by
the association and with respect
to those elected to the board of
directors." Miss Marshall ex-
plained.

Miss Marshall said the AHSA
can provide the "linking up of
Africans in Africa and Africans
in diaspora. We deny the Eu-
ropean view that African peo-
ples outside of Africa have no
historical, cultural, or contem-
porary links with Africa.'
She said "the ASA has not
taken a stand on current poli-
tical and social issues such as
South Africa, but we feel that
as the academic community is
involved in the issues of Viet-
nam and classified research, so
we should be involved, as scho-
lars, on the problem of South
Africa and similar states."
AHSA President John Clarke
and Prof. Eliot Skinner, former
ambassador from the U.S. to
U p p e r Volta, presented the
statement which condemned the

ASA as "irrelevant to the in-
terests and needs of black
people."
It specifically stated that
"African peoples will no longer
permit our people to be raped
culturally, economically, politi-
cally and intellectually merely
to provide European scholars
with intellectual status symbols
of African artifacts hanging in
their living rooms and irrele-
vant and injurious lectures for
their classrooms."
Last year black ASA mem-
bers informally declared their
discontent with the structure of
the organization, which is pri-
marily white, and its "racist
bias,' and formed the AHSA,
which also constitutes the black
caucus of the ASA.

Brandt elected
W. German head
BONN iP- The Bundestag elected Willy Brandt chan-
cellor of West Germany yesterday, ending two decades of
Christian Democratic rule and giving West Germany its first
Socialist chancellor in the nation's 20-year history.
The vote in the lower house of Parliament was 251-235 in
Brandt's favor with five deputies abstaining, four ballots in-
valid and one deputy absent.
Brandt's victory, which gives him a mandate to govern
for the next four years, was made possible by a coalition with
the tiny Free Democratic party. In the Sept. 28 general elec-
tion, Brandt's'Social Democrats won only 244 seats to the
Christian Democrats 242, but the Free Democrats control
30 seats and -gave Brandt the necessary majority.
Brandt, 55, succeeds Chancellor.

Sitiri!3an

Baaty

Kurt Georg 'Kiesinger of the'
Christian Democrats under w h o
Brandt served as foreign minister.
They had formed a Christian
Democratic-Socialist coalition in
December 1966.
Brandt earlier w a s mayor of
West Berlin, a Socialist strong-
hold.

Shows Today only at 1 :30 and 8:00 P.M.I

SecOnud f I'Q[)l t pads

I

Wednesday, October 22, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

University of Michigan School of Music
Presents

1969-1910 FESTIVAL
OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC
Tonight-Wednesday, October 22, 8:00 P.M.
Rackham Lecture Hall
STRAVINSKY-"Fanfare for a New Theatre"
KURTZ--"Animations" William Albright, piano
CASTIGLIONI - "A Solemn Music II" Michigan
Contemporary Directions Ensemble with guest
soprano, Lynda Weston

the
newstoday

BERG-"Chamber Concerto" for piano and
with thirteen winds, Joseph Banowetz,
Reyes soloists, Theo Alcantara, Conductor

violin
Angel

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
Music by Bassett, Schafer, Stockhausen and
Lutoslowski
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Music by Webern, Shifrin and Berry
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Space provided by Pi Kappa Lambda

T ATL HELD OVER
EC - 3rd Big Week!
Program Information 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
SHOWS
TODAY
at LICE'S
9 P.M. ETA RA

r
r

THE CHILEAN GOVERNMENT imposed a state of siege in
Santiago in the wake of an army revolt.
After two units of a Chilean army division rebelled yesterday the
government issued a decree proclaiming the state of siege, which is
a modified form of martial law.
The rebellion leader. Brigadier General Roberto Viaux Marambo,
said the purpose of the rebellion was to gain a hearing for army offic-
ers Who complain of low pay and lack of adequate equipment. He
claimed to have the support of "85 per cent" of the army.
Although this figure could not be confirmed, there were contin-
ued reports of other army units joining the approximately 50 rebels.
There were no reported injuries.
The rebellion may assume significance for the United States, since
the U.S. has approximately $1 billion in copper mines in Chile.
THE SOMALIAN GOVERNMENT was overthrown by the
first military coup in the nation's nine-year existence.
A self-styled revolutionary council seized power yesterday, ap-
parently without bloodshed and less than 24 hours after the funeral
of assassinated President Abdirashid Ali Shermarke.
The Texas-size country on the tip of East Africa was sealed off
from the outside world as airports, seaports and all frontiers were
ordered closed with international communications interrupted.
The council also clamped a curfew on the capital city of Mogad-
ishu and said it would remain in effect until 10 a.m. today.
SENATE MINORITY LEADER Hugh Scott criticized the Nix-
on Administration's reaction to the moratorium.
The Pennsylvania Republican said yesterday "the Administra-
tion must accept the sincere intent of this debate and demonstra-
tions" as a phenomenon of freedom and a product of anguish over
the war." Such protests, he added, will not be stifled or talked down.
Scott said the American people have heard "enough of invective
against Americans who feel a different way."
Scott's remarks were seen as a response to Vice President Spiro
Agnew's charge Sunday that the leaders of the war protest are "hard
core dissidents and professional anarachists."
NGUYEN V'AN TIEU, South Vietnamese President, said he
opposes aniy unilateral ('ease-fire.
Thieu said yesterday he is willing to negotiate a cease-fire with
the enemy but would oppose any unilateral cease-fire, even if proposed
by President Nixon.
A government spokesman gave Thieu's views in response to reports
from the United States that Nixon is considering some kind of cease-
fire proposal in his Nov. 3 speech to the nation.
IIURRICANE LAURI streamed through the Gulf of Mexico,
threatening parts of Louisiana and Mississippi,
The growing storm, its highest winds whipping over open water
at 100 miles per hour, drifted nearly 50 miles eastward during the
early morning hours yesterday.
CZECII AND SOVIET LEADERS initiated eight days of talks
with a closed meeting in the Kremlin.
Czechoslovak Conmmunist Party First Secretary Gustav Husak,
Premier Oldrich Cernik and President Ludvik Svoboda met yesterday
with Soviet Communist Party General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev,
Premier Alexei Kosygin and President Nicolai Podgorny.
The official announcement gave no indication of the subjects
discussed, though it was earlier announced that the talks would lead
to decisions of "basic political importance,"

Vandals broke into the Selective Service office in
early yesterday, dumping the contents of unlocked
floor and getting them afire. The records were pi
and a half deep.
1970 FETE:
(iN phi t global 8DA
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (,- Trying to bolsteri
United Nations is shaping up an elaborate 25th anniv
including a global sununit meeting.
Details of the 1970 celebration still must be al
126-nation General Assembly, but there is wide agre
highlight will be a commemorative session attende
government.
These points are stressed in a report by a 25-nat
commnittee which has been study--
ing possible ways of observing the
anni versary."5... .

Meanwhile, in Washington, U.S.
officials said t h e y expect little
immediate change in West Ger-
Page Three man-U.S. policy in the wake of
Brandt's election as chancellor.
Whether there wvill be changes in
the long run centers on how the
U.S. extricates itself f r o m the
Vietnam war and whether the So-
viet Union mellows its attitude to-
ward West Germany.
The U.S. officials said the main
reason for not expecting any im-
mediate foreign policy change is
that the new chancellor is t h e
same man who h as shaped his
country's foreign affairs since De-
cember, 1966, when he and fellow
. Social Democrats joined the con-:
servative Christian Democrats in
a grand coalition.
Brandt acquired an internation-
al name as mayor of West Berlin
from 1957 to 1966, but the So-
cialists under his leadership were
unable to control the government
in the 1961 and 1965 elections.
. Brandt and the leader of the
Free Democrats, Walter Scheel,
have been working out the form-'
ula under which their parties will
share power. Scheel is expected to
be foreign minister and vice
-A~socate Pr'S$ chancellor.
One of the new coalition's first
moves may be to sign the nuclear
Lorain, Ohio nonproliferation treaty, a in o v e
files oilthe long blocked by Kiesinger. Brandt
led up a foot doesn't think th e treaty would
have much international effect;
he has called it "nothing but a
useless sheet of paper" and has
compared it with "a group of al-
coholics getting together and,
t drawing up a pact to s t o p the,
spread of alcoholism."
/it lI' Other early moves of the new
government might be the setting
its prestige, the up of a European security con-
,ersary programn ference, with the United States as
a participant, and the operation
pproved by the of workable contacts with East
ement that the Germany. The partners in the
coalition are eager to end a stale-
d by heads of mate in Bonn's relations with the
Soviet Union and the rest of East-
ion preparatory ern Europe.

Japanese
students
Arrested
TOKYO UP)--A major left-wing
antiwar demonstration, aimed at
the government of Japanese Prime
Minister Eisaku Sato and the
United States, failed to material-
ize yesterday, although Tokyo and
major' Japanese cities wei'e grip-
ped for six houi's with fear' and
near paralysis.
Some 5,000 militant pro-Peking
Zengakuren students staged spo-
radic guerrilla assaults in the
streets of Tokyo, wrecking police
call boxes and stopping train
service.
But they never got near the
main targets of their self-pro-
claimed International Antiwar
Day: the prime minister's official
residence, government offices, the
U.S. Embassy and major railway
stations. The leftists ran into a
phalanx of a 25,000 riot police who
repeatedly turned them back.
By midnight, police said, they
had a r r e s t e d 1,393 students
throughout the country, most of
them in Tokyo.
Informed sources said about 60
persons were injured, including 28
policemen. Most of the injurees
came fiom burns caused by flam-
ing gasoline bombs. Two police
were in critical condition.
An estimated 500,000 leftists--
sponsorstclaimed5amillion-pa'-
ticipated in noisy but orderly ral-
lies, demonstrations and parades
throughout the country to observe
antiwar day.
The left wing and its sympa-
thizers were protesting the Viet-
nam war, demanding immediate
return of Okinawa and the scrap-
ping of the U.S.-Japan security
treaty which comes up for review
in 1970. They also oppose Sato's
visit to Washington next month
for talks with President Nixon on
a timetable for Okinawa's rever-
sion to'Japan.

Friday
and
Saturday
at
1, 3, 5,1
7, 9 P.M.
AND
11 P.M.
Soon
"EASY
RIDER"

r1
ine

:
I
i}j
4

Tentative plans call for the
summit meeting to take place at
U.N. headquarters just before the
official birthday. Tihe assembly is
expected to approve the plans and
set the dates before the current
session adjourns in December.
If the plans are adopted it will
be the fi'st time since 1960 that
a large number of heads of gov-
ernment have taken part in an as-
sembly session. The 1960 session
was attended by 21 prime minis-
ters and presidents including Niki-
ta Khrushchev, Dwight D. Eisen-
hower. Jawaharlal Nehru and
Fidel Castr-o.
Few of those present in 1960 will
be around for the proposed meet-
ing next year. The United States,
Britain, France and the Soviet
Union all have new leaders as do
many smaller countries.

110Wh

nsworth vote uncertain

WASHINGTON (P If Presi-
dent Nixon swayed any undecided'
senators with his strongly worded;
defense of Judge Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr., they are keeping
it to themselves.
The more than 20 senators who
hold the key to confirmation of
Haynsworth's nomination to the
Supreme Court didn't show any
signs that Nixon's statement Mon-I
day would start a stampede to
back the administration.
Such senior Republicans as
George D. Aiken of Vermont and
John J. Williams of Delaware still'
are listed as undecided with an
expected vote on confirmation
about two weeks off.
Nixon said at a surprise news
conference Monday Haynsworth

character assassination.' The Pres-
ident said he would not withdraw
his nomination even if Hayns-
worth requested him to do so.
Aiken said later he still hasn't
decided how he will vote on
Hanysworth's confirmation.
"I doubt if the President made
any votes by his statement," Aik-
en commented.
But Sen. Roman L. Hruska of
Nebraska, r a n k i n g Republican
member of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, said he is more confi-
dent than ever the Senate will
confirm Haynsworth, now chief'
judge of the 4th U.S. Court of
Appeals.
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-nd), a
leader of the opposition, said con-
flict-of-interest charges he has

the adnunistration "and make an
eloquent case against confirmation
of Judge Haynsworth."
"It is unfortunate that the Pres-
ident appears to be leveling his
guns at me personally in an effort
to distort the true issue and make
the nomination of Judge Hayns-
worth a partisan matter," Bayh
said.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University ot
Michigan, News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class p« stage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. 'Pubished daily Tues-
day hrug Sunday morning Univerv-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
Carrier. $10 by man1.
Summer ssion published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

1%I6/GR

"ALICE'S RESTAURANT" ARLO GUTHRIE
PAT01 'JAMES BRODERICK PETE SER "LEE WAYS M
CWI WIILAW iA- TW ~ AHiN "WR N APV Fr " t s#W~AQAIi ~TS
.-VENABLE HERNDON .ARTHUR PENN
.HILLARD ELKINSJOE MANDIJKE ARTHUR PENN
COLOR by DeLuxe ,V4~1e"1ON4 NT ART qS COI) II"iUited
Aptists

has been subjected to "vicious made have not been refuted by

,

Homecoming

'69

r
C
Ip
C1

presents
Blood, Sweat and Tears
INDIVIDUAL SALES
; BEGIN TODAY
AA AA &hA L ~ A AA %

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22
DR. CHICAGO
Directed by Ann Arbor's Own George Manupelli
Starring
ALVIN LUCIER
MARY ASHLEY

WORLD PREMIERE MON., NOS SATNOV.S

Daily Classifieds Get Results

AUDRA
LINDLEY

JAMES
WHITMORE
Tfl)

CATHERINE
BURNS

I

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan