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October 19, 1969 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-19

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Sunday, October 19, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine'

SudaOctobr 19 196 THEMICHGAN1AILYPageNin

STUDY ORDERED:

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

IN CONCERT:

TUESDAY, OCT. 21

Servicemen on welfare rolls

HILL AUD., 8:00 p.m.
DAVE BRUBECK'S
Light' in the Wilderness
MAYNARD KLEIN, CONDUCTING
U-M ARTS CHORALE,
ANTONIO PEREZ, soloist
JAZZ ENSEMBLE
HARP, ORGAN
ADMISSION FREE

(Continued from Page 3)
of four. Pentagon figures s h o w
that 1.2 million men in the armed
forces' lowest three ranks receiveI
less than that amount annually.
The Nixon proposals, however,
specifically exclude servicemen
from coverage. Poverty in the
military, reasons a federal welfare
official, should be taken care of
under the military pay act, not,

New Jersey welfare officials
figured the family needed $400 a7
month to live on, so the state
gives it a $135 monthly welfarek
grant.1
"The money would be okay if
no problems came up, but once in
a while you get hit with some bills
and you're stuck," said the air-
man, who pays $115 rent for his]
shabby four-room trailer.

thus enabling them to live off a
meager salary.
But the Vietnam war brought
higher draft calls and the induc-
tion of more married men, many
of whom have children, especially
college graduates called when
their student deferments expire.
"The people that need military
housing the most can't get it and:
are forced out on the local econ-

The Daily Official Bulletin is au
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
3528 LSA before 2 p.m. of the day
preceding publication and by 2~
p.m. Friday for Saturday and Sun-
day. Items may appear only once.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
information, phone 764-9270.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19

MONDAY, OCTOBER 20
Department of Romance Languages
and Comparative Literature Program
Lecture: Denis de Rougemont. "'Th
Invention of Love in the Western
World": Aud. A. Angell, 4:10 pm.
William W. Cook Lecture on Amer-
i-an Institutions: Politics Of Change -
W. Willard Wirtz, Former U.S. Sec. of
Labor, "Five Cases of Controversy, 1961-
68": 100 Hutchins, 4:15 p.m.
Geography Seminar: Prof. J o h n
Nystuen, "Analysis of Branch B a n k
Locations": 4050 LSA, 4:15 p.m.

'1

through welfare.
Using Pentagon figures, the Na-
tional Council on Hunger a n d
Malnutrition calculates that about
200,000 military families are eli-
gible for the Agriculture Depart-
ment's food stamp program.
The Defense Department, how-
ever, bans use of food stamps in
its 315 commissaries.
At an Army base near Wash-
ington, a military family service
agency put together a sample bud-
get to meet the minimum needs
of a corporal with a w i f e and
child. Despite the low prices avail-
able in commissaries and post ex-
change stores, t h e agency con-
cluded the family "must live be-
low the poverty level in this area."
As a result, it said, the soldier
must either moonlight, babysit
while his wife works nights, seek

omy," says welfare director Gal-
He says he'd rather live on base, la r s a retired Army lieutenant Day Caendar General Notices
but there's not enough free hous-ecolonel.it___es
igforthe owr aking men. ( senate Assembly: Rion., Oct. 20, 3:15
ing or e ower rankg me. At a large southern Army post, C. S. Mott Children's Iospital Dedi- p.m., Rackham Amphitheater, Ageda:
They tell me it's privilege to live 26 soldiers applying for A r m y cation: Dow Auditorium, Towsley cen- 1. Consideration of minutes of red-
live off base," he said. Emergency Relief loans during a ter,7:00 and 9:05 p.m. ar meeting of Sept. 15 and special
The Defense Department, at the five-day period last month were International Center Film: "The Lir- meeting of Sept. 29; 2. Announcements
.tn pden and Glory of John F. Kennedy": and Communications; 3. ROTC - Final
request of Sen. Clifford P. Case, asked if they'd turn to public wel- International Center, 7:30 p.m. report of the Academic Affairs Comm.
(R-N.J.) and Rep. John S. Mon- fare if it were available to them.___
agan (D-Conn.) has asked t h e Ten said yes. The others answered :rPlacement>Service
states how many servicemen arej no, mostly because, they said, of ORGANIZAT IO N Placement Service
on their relief rolls. The study is their pride. GENERAL DIVISION
to be disclosed this month, but it Emergency Relief and the Red N TICES eSaB n
may be incomplete. Many states Coshlsevcmnwt d-Late Interview Announcement, Johns
Cryass helpmserv.cemny siths Cross hOTICESvic.m,:::.hr"nd:-Hopkins University Master of Arts in
told the Pentagon it's impossible vidual loans on an emergency bas- Teaching interviewing Tuesday, October
to come up with a figure without is. They don't help with continu- Young Americans for Freedom, Oct.j 21.
going through their welfare rolls, ing financial troubles. 19. 4:00 p.m., Rm. 3B', Union. Topic: Career Opportunities in public per-
case by case, a Pentagon source A study of poverty in the Army aper". snnelPub. Ad., Liberal arts, Psychology, So-
said. to be published in the University University Fellowship of Hu'on Hills cial Sci, Bus. Ad, and statistics stu-
"We have a system of involun- of Chicago Press's Social Service Baptist Church, Oct. 19, 7:00 p.m., 2nd dents., Free to students, October 21
tary servitude that condemns a Review declares that "the social? fl., Y-YWCA, speaker: Eng. D e a n 4:00 p.m. at Sheraton-Cadillac Hotel.
Gordon Van Wylen, "Reflections on theI Program iavail at aCreer Planning, 764-
serviceman to a life of poverty - fabric of the Army contributes to crisis in Contemporary Society" i 6338, also listings of meetings in morn-
which we're suppose to be waging poverty, and no agency of t h e , ng and early afternoon to which stu-
a wag' against." declares Rep. Al-g vernment has done more to ere- p v r .in o . ...... +.. - a- _- ?dents may come also.

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OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS -9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
SUBSCRIPTIONS -- 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS -764-0557
10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY - 12:30 p.m.
DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554
MONDAY-- 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TUESDAY thru FRIDAY-- 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.
DEADLINE 2 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Monday at NOON for Tuesday's paper

help from relatives or turn to wel- ,"wr U"'k' 'uu""v "'' 1UI 1,U kiClub meeting, Monday, Oct.
fare. vin O'Konski (R-Wis.), a member ate it., 20, 7:30 p.m. 3Y, Union. Final sign-
In a rundown trailer camp in of the House Armed Services Com- It lays the blame on "a selec- ups for Aspen Trip.
Browns Mills, N.J., for example, a mittee. tive service system that inducts
30-year-old Air Force enlisted The military pay system has married men with or without UM Oceanological society; Regular
meeting Tuesday. Oct. 21, 7:00 p.m.,
man lives with his wife and infant long been geared to the use of children, an antiquated and in- room 1028 Nat. Reg. Bldg. John Gissberg
son. They tried getting by on the large numbers of young, single adequate military compensation will return to continue his discussion
$265 a month in pay and allow- men drafted into its ranks, quar- system . . . and the inability of on Sea Law and present his film onj
ance he earns as an airman first tered in barracks, f e d, clothed, unwillingness of the Army to dis- Japanese fishing trawlers off the Alas-
class at nearby McGuire Air Force and watched over by a compara- charge most soldiers who are terwards. All welcome!!
Base, but couldn't make it. tively small cadre of older men, poor." *1 ]
The study, by David N. Saund- Concert Dance Organization: T u e s
eis, a former A r m y community Oct. 21, 7:00 p.m., Men's Modern DanceI
sevcsofie n ocooit Technique, 8:00 p.m. Coed Beginningj
services officer and sociologist, intermediate Modern Technique. Wed.,
Dosays that 6 to 8 per cent - or Oct. 21, 7:15 p.m "Etchings in Dance
Department of Physics 30,000 to 40,000 - of all Army No. 1" followed by a showing of a
families are poor and that an ad- dance film of historic merit. Barbour
ditional 40,000 to 50,000 subsist Dance Studio. No charge.

Robert Fuddield, director of Ar-
gonne National Laboratory near
Chicago, w ill discuss "Scientific
Solutions to Environmental Prob-,
lems," at a physics department
colloquium on Wednesday, Oct. 22,
at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. F of the Phy-
sics and Astronomy Bldg. He is ex-
pected to speak on the role scien-
tists and national laboratories can
play in solving such public dilem-
mas as air and water pollution.
Otis Dudley Duncan, a sociolo-
gy professor in human ecology,
has been named to the Charles
Horton Cooley University profes,
sor'ship, announced the Regents
this past Friday. A member of the
University faculty since 1962,
Duncan has compiled pepulation
studies used around t h e world.
The Duncan Index of Social Stat-
us has become the standard meas-
ure of social stratification.

i

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22
4:.15 P.M.
Robert B. Duffield
Director, Argonne National Laboratory
"SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS TO
ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS"~
Auditorium F
Physics and Astronomy Building

on marginal incomes.
------- COUPON-.------
* I
I I
THOMPSON'S1
PIZZA
761-0001
offD50c Doff'
Large one item (or more) I
j pizza. One coupon per pizza
I I
Mon., Tues., Wed., ,
Thurs. Only I
OCT. 20-23 ;
. m...... ............."

Bach Club meeting Thurs., Oct. 23,
8:00 p.m., 1236 Washtenaw (at Forest)
Speaker: Wayne Linder, 'Problems in
Performance in Bach's Cantata 152".
No musical knowledge needed. For fur-
ther info: 761-7356; 663-2827; 665-6806.
U.M1 Ski Club Meeting, Monday, Oct.
20, 7:30 p.m., 3Y, Union. Final sign-
ups for Aspen Trip.

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7
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EUROPE $I89
ROUND TRIP BOEING 707 JET
* $50 deposit reserves seat
0 12 departure dates
" a wide variety of flights
and travel services
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
1231 South University-769-6871
a non-profit student cooperative

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ANN ARBOR

FESTI

'AL

OF

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E

T

Fl

From October 21st through 23rd, Ann Arbor Resistance will sponsor the ANN ARBOR FESTIVAL OF MOVEMENT FILMS

. The lar-

gest collection of revolutionary films ever shown in Michigan. Nearly all of the more than 35 films produced by NEWSREEL in the
last two years, and more than a score of foreign films imported from fraternal organizations will be shown. These films will be screen-
ed in thematic groups and each group will be accompanied by a workshop.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21
ANGELL - AUDITORIUM A-B
8 - 12 ADMISSION $1.50
AUDITORIUM A
DOMESTIC COLONIES-Black, American Indian, Puerto Rican, Mexican-American
and other peoples live in a different America from white working people, students
and youth, Culturally, politically and economically, they are oppressed and exploited
as colonies within imperial America. This group of films traces the failure of the
civil rights movement to achieve meaningful progress "within the system," the co-
optatve and suppressive efforts of the state, parallels with U.S. imperialism abroad,
and the emergence of revolutionary nationalism among Third World peoples here in
the United States.
FILMS
NOW - Cuban film by Santiago Aivarez, winner of 2nd prize, Leipzig.
TROUBLEMAKERS - Film of Newark Community Union Project, year before riots.
6th STREET MEAT CLUB - Domestic pacification program fails in meat co-op.
WILMINGTON - Analysis of a company town-Dupont Corporate control.
VENEZUELAN FALN - Outbreak of guerrilla struggle in Venezuela.
COMMUNITY CONTROL - Struggle in Black and Puerto Rican communities in N.Y.
PANTHER - Basic first film about the Black Panther Party.
MAYDAY - 2nd film - The Black Panthers as they have developed.-United Front.
RIOT CONTROL WEAPONS - Explanation of government weapons for the cities.
- SIMULTANEOUSLY -
AUDITORIUM B
THIRD WORLD LIBERATION-The U.S. government undertook the role of world
cop at the end of the Second World War, using the rationalization of anti-Commu-
nism and the domestic prod of McCarthyite repression. Control of Latin America was
consolidated, pieces of collapsing European empires in Asia and Africa were acquired.
But the Chinese revolution, the stalemate in Korea, and the Cuban revolution shat-
tered the myth of American omnipotence, and the heroic struaale of the Vietnamese

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22
ANGELL - AUDITORIUM B-C
8-12 ADMISSION $1.50
AUDITORIUM B
DOMESTIC IMPERIALISM and WOMEN'S LIBERATION-Everybody seems to agree
that there are a lot of things about America that have to be changed. But how? Is
peaceful reform "within the system" possible and desirable, or will the American
people have to seize political and economic power to make it serve our needs? The
first group of films lays the documentary foundation for the argument that liberal,
institutional reform-peaceful, piece-meal approaches to complexly inter-related
SYSTEMIC contradictions-is not merely ineffectual, but actually counter-productive
to change in the interests of the people. The second group of films covers national
actions by women and their increasing understanding of their oppression as a
sex, and offers the socialist alternative of full and equal participation in society.
FILMS .
TROUBLEMAKER-Film of Newark Community Union Project--year before riots.
6th STREET MEAT CLUB-Domestic Pacification programs fails in meat coop.
COMMUNITY CONTROL-struggle in Black and Puerto Rican communities in N.Y.
HOSPITAL-corporate medicine vs. the people.
WILMINGTON-Analysis of a company town-Dupont Corporate control.
LINCOLN CENTER-Urban renewal destroys a neighborhood.
JEANETTE RANKIN BRIGADE--10,000 women lead anti-war demonstration.
UP AGAINST THE WALL, MISS AMERICA-Atlantic City won't forget this contest!
DAY OF PLANE HUNTERS-men care for children while women farm and shoot guns.
- SIMULTANEOUSLY -
AUDITORIUM C
STRATEGIES OF THE STUDENT MOVEMENT-The largest mass base of the move-
ment is on the campus, our greatest strength and limitation. Narrowness of student
demands and isolation of student struggles prejudices the chances for winning even
"student-power" demands, and effectively precludes maior changes like ending the
draft and America's pivotal student struggles and strategies, and provides a docu-
mentary basis for discussion of the issues.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT MOVEMENT-This group of films covers maior revo-
lutionary actions by students in alliance with working people, and examines the rela-
tion between student activists from an advanced industrial country and the strijgale
to build socialism in the Third World.
SIIDAM kO wrUCDfe -IRAM C TI1r.I'*'We ,T . ... .. .-.L :I.. .x £.Cl-L- 4 +k..li

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23
ANGELL - AUDITORIUM A-B

8-12

ADMISSION $1.50

AUDITORIUM A
WHITE NIGGERS-White youth and students are working their way out of the sterile
tensions and alienation of life in the corporate society. They have been experimenting
with more freely cohesive, self-defining social forms, and undertaking collective self-
expression and self-defense. This group of films, based on community action on the
Lower East Side of New York, and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, covers the drop-
out, hip life-style movement in some depth, as well as police and army pressures
and national actions.
FILMS
PIG POWER-students take to streets and police "preserve disorder."
LAST SUMMER WON'T HAPPEN-formation of hip political community--Krassner-
Hoffmann.
HAIGHT-"children of love" forced to defend their culture.
HIDE 'N SEEK-fantasy of guerrilla struggle in U.S.
GARBAGE-garbage dumped in Lincoln Center-a national symbol of "cultural ele-
gance."
THE BRIG--Filmed on the stage of the Living Theater and with the original
cast, Kenneth Brown's nightmarish picture of life inside a Marine
Corps iail has been tightened and condensed by the selective
filming of Jonas Mekas---Presented at Festivals in Venice--New
York-London.
YIPPIE!-Spaced-out view of 1968 Democratic Convention demonstrations.
PEOPLE'S PARK-history and analysis of confrontation over People's Park in Berke-
ley.
RIOT CONTROL WEAPONS-explanation of government weapons for the cities.
- SIMULTANEOUSLY --
AUDITORIUM B
VIETNAM WAR and NATIONAL ACTION-The entire movement-student, Youth
and working people-sometimes marshals its forces to establish a presence on na-
tional issues-in recent years primarily the continuing, vicious war against the
people of Vietnam. Thisdgroup offilms examines movement conscousness and evalu-
ations of its actions, and places these actions in the world context of liberation from
U.S. imperialism.
F ILMS

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