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October 18, 1969 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 18, 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 18, 1969

Wirtz

blasts

U. .

By RUSS GARLAND
Former Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz
strongly criticized all three branches of the
federal government in a lecture on "The Ma-
chinery of Government" at the Law School
yesterday.
Wirtz, labor secretary under Kennedy and
Johnson, drew an audience of 200. His lecture
was the second in a series on "Politics of
Change."
In his discussion of the executive branch of
the government, Wirtz belittled meetings of the
cabinet as "ceremonial."
"The problems have gotten so big that they
just don't fit in a discussion with 14 people,"
he said.
Wirtz also suggested a major overhaul in the
seniority system of promotion in the executive
branch. Since the administration must be run by
political appointees, he said ,the top three grades
of the civil service should be dropped.
Wirtz cited Congress as the most conserva-
tive branch of the government. The filibuster, he
said "is the very symbol of the antagonism to
change."

roernment
Discussing corrupt practices and conflict
of interest rules, Wirtz likened congressionally
approved restrictions to "chicken fences built
by foxes."
"The rules are established by legislators and
then applied only to the judicial and executive
branches," he charged. "The rules are necessary,
but there is no justification for the use they're
being put to."
"I resent the tearing up of a man's character
to oppose a President or to impress the folks
back home," he added.
By contrast to the conservative nature of
the legislative branch, Wirtz remarked that the
judicial has never exerted a retarding force on
legislation. Probably the Supreme Court has
been the most innovative force in the govern-
ment of the '60s," he said.
"I'm not sure that's good," Wirtz added. "It
may be, but even in the hardest driving change,
the Supreme Court shou1ld be a back seat driver,
rather than the driver at the wheel."
Wirtz also questioned the implications of a
governmental system whose most innovative
component is farthest from the electorate.
MS U names

COLLEGE GOVERNMENT:
LSA studies student role

1969-70

THE

1969-70

Continued from Page 1
assembly proposal, and issue a
final version of its own.
The call for this plan comes at
a time when the LSA faculty is
considering a number of changes
in their present system of monthly
all-faculty meetings.
The alternatives, proposed to
the faculty last month in a report
from the college executive com-
mittee include:
-A council of faculty repre-
sentatives, elected at large from
the faculty, to meet regularly to
consider major items of business.
The entire faculty, under this

plan, would meet only twice a
year for formal business.
-A similar faculty council with
representation on a departmental
basis.
-A..joint student-faculty coun-
cil.
The LSA executive committee
originally considered proposing
the faculty-student council plan
for debate at the.October faculty
meeting, but withdraw that plan
in favor of the faculty council
plan based on departmental repre-
sentation.
The plan was severely criticized
at that meeting.

it

Wirtz

ST UDENT-FACULTY CONTROL:

Regents approve bookstore plan president

(Continuedirfm age: t)
Smith, referring to private con-
sultations late Thursday. "All
views were thoroughly aired be-
fore we finally disposed of it in
this way."
At yesterday's meeting Regent
Robert Brown (R-Kalamazoo)
questioned the need for another
bookstore in Ann Arbor. SACUA
Vice-Chairman Robert Knauss
responded that students want to
take advantage of the sales t a x
exemption and provide competi-
tion for existing stores.
Meanwhile, a Diag rally on the
issue drew a cold crowd of about
100 students. The rally took on
a celebratory quality after the re-
gental vote was announced.
Speakers agreed that the energy
used in working for the bookstore

should be channeled into o t e r
issues including low-coset hous-
ing, open admissions, and great-
er student decision-making pow-
ers.
"Schools should be run by stu-
dents and faculty," said SGC
members Mike Farrell, adding
that the administration could be
"kept around for paperwork."
At the Regents meeting, those
voting for the bookstore proposal'
were Regents Smith, Gertrude
Huebner (R-Bloomfield Hill'),
Gerald Dunn (D-Flushing), Ro-
bert Nederlander (D-Birming-
ham) and Lawrence Lindemer (R-
Stockbridge).
Those voting against the pro-
posal were Regents Brown, Robert
Cudlip (R-Grosse Points) and
Paul Goebel (R-Grand Rapids).

Yesterday marked the third

(Continuied from Page 1)

time in three months that the Re- Hartman said he voted against
gents have taken action on the Wharton because he thought the
bookstore. other trustees were trying to
In July, the Regents unani- "ramrod" the appointment. "I'ms
mously defeated a Student Gov- not condemning Wharton, but I}
ernment Council proposal which want more time to evaluate his
would have included the use of;qualications, he said.
University funds and a special The other two dissenting Demo-
tuition assessment to fund t he crats could not be reached for
store. They also voted 4-4 de- comment.
feating a plan allowing for vol- Wharton, an honors graduate of
untary funding of the store. Harvard University, helped to
found the National Students As-
In September, the Regeants ap- sociation in 1946.
proved a compromise pVroposal The son of an American am-
which would have given V i ce bassador to Norway, Boston-=born
President and Chief Financial Of- bartoNwas aye Bistonak rna
ficer Wilbur Pierpont control of Wharton was the first black man
the store. Initial capital would to serve on the directing boards
have come from a special fee as- of one of the country's ten largest
sessment, but only if a referend- corporations, Equtable Life As-
um surance Society. He laughs, how-
um on the assessmentRSvcieu' ever, at being called a member of _
under conditions set by the Re- the Establishment.
gents. Wharton said some of his best
The September decision led to q friends were militants. "I won't
series of demonstrations - includ- identify them, it might embarrass
ing the LSA Bldg. sit-in last them," he added.
month which resulted in the ar- Wharton is an expert in econ-
rest of 107 persons, 97 of them omic development problems in
students. Latin America and Southeast Asia.
I,

MICHIGAN STATE
versus
MICHIGAN
FOOTBALL
0 WC BII 650
Starting with WCBN pre-game
show with Brian Daniels-1:15
KICKOFF-1:30
Exclusive halftime and postgame reports live from
Spartan Stadium with Al Wisk
SATURDAY, OCT. 18
Starting at 1:15 P.M.

EASTERN
MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS SE RIES
a tuneful delight
PAINT YOUR WAGON
Oct. 31-Nov. 2 and Nov. 5-8
amercia 's most searching drama
DEATH OF A SALESMAN
December 10-14
brecht's multi-media anti-war explosion
MOTHER COURAGE
March 5-8
sauciest comedy of a saucy age
THE COUNTRY WIFE
May 20-24
SEASON COUPON SEASON COUPON
BOOKS BOOK HOLDERS
-still only $5.00 -save 29 Odoover
for four qreat plays ticket price
-qet first choice
PERFORMANCES pf performances
IN THE and locations
QUIRK AUDITORIUM -exchange their
coupons (and order
-box office open guest tickets if
weekdays 12:45- desired) a full
4:30 p.m. week ahead of
information: 482-3453 ooen sale
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY THEATRE
YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN 48197
Please Send ___ EMU Players 1969-70 Season Coupon Books
at the Total Price Per Book of $5.00 for the Four Ploys
Name Telephone

Street

Citv.

State -Zip Code
I Enclose a Stamped, Self-Addressed 4"x9>" Envelope Plus
Check or Money Order (Payable to the EMU Theatre) Totaling
$___

Year of the tenant?

(Cuntinued from Page 1)
In Trenton Terrace Apts. inI
Washington, tenants have b e e n1
striking for 15 months in the na-
tion's longest strike.
In the nation's most dramatic
strike, 1,000 St. Louis public hous-J
ing tenants have withheld rent
since February in an attempt to
restrict rent increases so noI
family pays more than 25 per cent'
of its income for rent.
And at. Universities - Berkeley,1
Wisconsin, Colorado and O h l o
State -- student tenant unions
are staging strikes.
And these strikes have resulted
in concrete gains for tenants. In
July, the U.S. Department of

Housing and Urban Development
announced a dramatic increase in
the number of 'public housing
tenants who sit on local housing
authority policy-making boards.
Cities where this has taken place
include Cambridge, Boston a n d
Chicago.
The report argues that two key
problems causing the increased
tenant militancy are the national
housing shortage and the inequity
of laws dealing with landlord-ten-
ant relationships.
"Their lack of rights comes as
a surprise to most tenants, w.,he-
ther upper-income or lower," says
the report. "They have begun to
organize."

UNION

I NDIA STUDENTS ASSOCIA TION
Ann Arbor
PRESENTS
SANZ AUR SAVERA
c Starring: GURU DATT and MINAKUMAR I
Music: SIIANKAR JAIKISII.AN
rONIGHT
ATRUEBLOOD AUD.' 7:-5,. 1. .-
Admission: Membrlers-s .,S, Utlrers 1.7

1528 SA B

763-3102

I

0

'70 Nova

MAR~K OF LJ.ELLENC1

Less filling

You might think that if you come to work for
us we'll stick you behind a desk making phones
for the rest of your life.
Uh-uh.
Don't be misled by the word Telephone in
our name.
Actually we're a group of over 60 companies
and some of them hannen to be in the telenhone

panies, like Sylvania.
Sylvania manufactures over 10,000 products
alone, knocking out everything from Micro-
Electronic Semi-Conductor Devices to Educa-
tional Communications Systems.
The communications field is one of the
fastest-growing industries around. The more it
grows. the more we grow and the more room

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