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October 17, 1969 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-17

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Friday, October 17, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

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Moratorium

reactions:

GRETA GARBO
in
ANNA KARENI1NA
From the man who gave you "War and Peace"
-PLUS-
A SHORT ON MARI LYN MONROE
OCTOBER 17-18
Fri.-Sat. 7-9:15 Aud. A 75c (cheap)
NEXT WEEK
PAUL NEWMAN
as
HARPER

By The Associated Press
The impact of moratorium day, the
largest anti-war protest in American
history, was visible in the diverse re-
actions it caused throughout the Unit-
ed States and the world yesterday.
The reactions ranged from sharp
criticism of the protest to enthusiastic
expressions of support. But these ex-
pressions were sometimes tragic.
In Blackwood, N.J., two high school
seniors committed suicide after at-
tending a moratorium observance.
Craig Badiali and Joan Fox, both 17,
were found dead in a monoxide-filled
car yesterday. They left a number of
notes saying they died in. the name
of peace.
Badiali's 21-year-old brother said,
"My brother died of his anti-war con-
victions." A medical investigator said
the two students had asked that all

who heard of their death work for
peace.
In New York, Mayor John V. Lind-
say appeared at City Hall on the day
of the moratorium to endorse the anti-
war effort. Lindsay, Liberal candidate
for re-election in November, received
large receptions at ten rallies. His
proclamation lowering flags and his
participation in the moratorium were
his deepest plunges into the peace
movement so far.
"This form of dissent is the highest
form of patriotism," said Lindsay.
"Anyone who says this demonstration
is unpatriotic does not know the his-
tory of his own nation."
John Marchi, Lindsay's opponent,
blasted Lindsay, charging he had
"planted a dagger in the back of
American servicemen in Vietnam" by
proclaiming Wednesday a day of

mourning and participating in its
events.
Marchi backs President Nixon's Viet-
nam policy.
Democratic candidate Mario Procac-
cino, who has called the war "a colos-
sal mistake," said the moratorium was
"perfectly all right."
In Washington, spokesmen for Pres-
ident Nixon said telegrams from the
public tabulated during a 24-hour pe-
riod ending yesterday morning sup-
ported President Nixon's Vietnam poli-
cies by a margin of more than 4 to 1.
Press Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler
said the figures did not relate directly
to the nation-wide demonstrations but
coincided with them.
After the moratorium, a spokesman
for President Nixon said, "I don't
think the President can be affected
by a mass demonstration of any kind."

Praise, C
Herbert G. Klein, Nixon's director of
communications, s a i d Wednesday
'night, "It's also true and clear to the
President that a vast majority of the
American people are supporting his
policy." -
Various local leaders of moratorium
day observations expressed confidence
that the President, who said earlier he
"he would not in any way be affected
by the moratorium," would eventually
be. forced to accede to the protesters'
demands.
Jerome Grossman, a Boston busi-
nessman who helped originate Viet-
nam Moratorium Day, said yesterday
he is delighted with the response.
"We are overwhelmed at the re-
sponse of the people and we don't see
how President Nixon can fail to change
his policies."
"We look forward to his announcing

WORLD PREMIERE

II

MNNV. 3. SAT., NOV.!

-

JAMES
WHITMORE

AUDRA
LINDLEY

CATHERINE
BURNS

the
news today
by T'he Associated Press and College Press Service

rifiCism
a major change of policy on Nov. 3,
and we are going to repeat the same
venture in November or as long as it
takes, if he doesn't," Grossman added.
And Sam Brown, a coordinator of
the moratorium, said in Washington,
"If there is no change in Vietnam
policy, if the President does not re-
spond, there will be a second mora-
torium."
Already demonstrations are being
scheduled for the next three months
amid a warning they might prove less
peaceful than yesterday's action.
New York's City's moratorium co-
ordinator, Adam Walinsky, said "If
Nixon does not respond, people will
be left with a choice between apathy
on the one hand and another sort of
political action on the other, perhaps
violent."
See STRIKE, Page 6
stay after
Viet peace
WASHINGTON (/P) - Secretary
of Defense Melvin R. Laird said
yesterday the United States is
planning on keeping a "residual
force" of several thousand men as
trainers and advisers in Vietnam
after the end of all fighting.
His remark, at an impromptu
news conference, was the first of-
ficial word that the United States
was thinking of keeping some
troops in Vietnam for a time after
the war.
"I wouldn't want to make any
prediction," Laird said when ask-
ed how long such a force would
remain.
He declined to discuss contin-
gency planning specifically, but
indicated such a residual force
would be a little bigger than the
6,000 to 7,000 advisers he said
were there in the Kennedy ad-
ministration. That was before the
Krulwich United States entered the ground
ries on war on a large scale under Presi-
dent Johnson, raising the U.S.
troop commitment to 543,500 men.
; The question of a residual force
came up in a discussion of budget-
ing plans for fiscal 1971, which
begins next June 30.

bilvVbi.!

T I
ti EVAN HUNTER

wwslo vw

THE UNITED STATES rejected an offer by Hanoi for
secret negotiations.
The offer, made by the North Vietnamese delegation to the Paris1
peace talks, suggested that the U.S. bypass the Saigon government
and begin the secret talks immediately.'
However, Henry Cabot Lodge, chief U.S. delegate to the Paris1
negotiations, said that any private talks must include all four parties
at the Paris conference.
THE SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE voted in favor of a 5
per cent income tax surtax for the first six months of next year.
The vote was reported recorded by approximately a 2-1 margin.
The 10 per cent surtax on incomes expires Dec. 31. President Nixon{
asked for a 5 per cent extension, and the House has voted in favorj
of it.
SOYUZ 6 and the two cosmonauts aboard it returned to earth
after testing experimental welding techniques in space.

Does/aed by JO MIELZINER
Directed by I

T 2nd WEEK
Program Information 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
SHOWS
Thursday tCE'1
1, 3,u5,c7,s
9 P.M.

x

Friday
and
Saturday
at
It 3, 5,
7, 9 P.M.
AND
11 P.M.
Soon
"EASY
RIDER"

lk IL

!'-
Ir

The first of the three spaceships sent up last weekend made a
soft landing in a "preset area" yesterday. The return of Soyuz 6 left
two manned spaceships and five cosmonauts still in orbit.
The welding was done in an attempt to determine the best meth-
od of putting together the permanent space stations which the Soviets
plan to assemble. It was the first time orbiting spacemen have at-
tempted to weld metals together.
THE JUMP IN UNEMPLOYMENT reported last month as
the biggest in nine years wasn't as large as Labor Department fig-
ures indicated, according to some government economists.
The report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics said the nation's
jobless rate rose from 3.5 to 4 per cent of the civilian labor force, the
sharpest monthly increase since 1960 and the highest rate in two
years.
But doubts are being expressed that the increase was as large as
reported, because the survey may have been affected by high school
and college students still looking for work. Had the survey been taken
a week later than it was, a lower unemployment rate would have been
recorded because the students would have quit the labor market to
return to classes.
NIXON ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS predicted a down-
ward trend in interest rates and a lessening of pressure toward
higher living costs by the start of the new year.
These forecasts were given to newsmen yesterday after the Presi-
dent met with ranking Democrats and Republicans on the congres-
sional appropriations and finance committees to pledge perserverence
in anti-inflation efforts.
THE 1969 NOBEL PRIZE for physiology and medicine was
awarded jointly to three American scientists.
Max Delbrueck of the California Institute of Technology, Alfred
D. Hershey of the Carnegie Institute, and Salvedor E. Luria of the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology were honored for discoveries
concerning the replication mechanism and genetic structure of viruses.
This was the fourth straight year the prize has been awarded to
scientists in the United States. The prize this year carries a record
cash amount of $75,000.

By TAMMY JACOBS
Former Secretary of Labor W.
Willard Wirtz blasted both the
media and the government yester-
day in a lecture entitled "Tyranny
in the Dialogue."
About 115 people attended the
lecture, first in a series by Wirtz
on "Politics of Change". T h e
series is part of the annual Wil-
liam W. Cook Lectures on Amer-
ican Institutions.
Wirtz, who served as Secre-
tary of Labor in the Kennedy and
Johnson administrations, referred
to dialogue as one of the greatest
aspects of democracy, but con-
demned the fact that the public
knows "less and less" about prob-
lems confronting it.

he also asserted that in all but
about two of the Presidential can-
didaciescthis century, the candi-
dates could have exchanged
speeches without changing t h e
election results.
"There isn't any dialogue." he
said. "Only sound. Not even fury,
but it signifies. It signifies t h a t
there's nothing there."
The fault is not only in t h e
government, according to Wirtz.
"The 'tendency of power to cor-
rupt applies to no place so much
as to the press," he commented. "I
question and challenge the right
of the press to give the public the
mix it does of what is good and
what is bad; and the diet is does
of what is or isn't important."

Wirtz hits media, goodi

-Daily-Sara K
Former Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz blasts press, government in the first of a lecture se
the "Politics of Change."

r'ernmeri

u e Laird forecast that spending for
Vietnam will "come down sub-
stantially" from the $30 billion it
is costing the United States to
for politicians, and prohibition of fight the war this year.
a TV station and a newspaper He avoided answering a ques-
owned jointly and serving the H vie nwrn us
rnean tion as to how many troops over-
samearall the United States will have in
Wirtz concluded his lecture by Vietnam by the beginning of the
saying that the problems faced in 1971 fiscal year.
"making politics responsive" to
the people, "seem to lie in the The administration already is
dialogue." moving to pull out up to 60,000
Wirtz will discuss "The Ma- troops this year, with further pull-
chinery of Government" at 4:15 backs expected by early in the
in Hutchins Hall today, and will next calendar year.
give two lectures next week.
These will be "Five Cases of
Controversy, 1961-1968" and "In-
venting the Future." A lecture en-
titled "Case for the Affirmative"
was cancelled because of Wed-
nesday's moratorium activities.

n

"AUCE'S RESTAURANT"','- ARLO GUTHRIE
PATQUNN "JAMES BRODERICK s,, m PETE SEEGER -LEE HAYS a McAL wMcuNAT
GMtuOWILA.TA CHNMKAHLEENDABNEY x' WiAM OBAAo Ni&ow OGT mm(
x VENABLE HERNDON. ARTHUR PENN y n" --"
bHILLARDELKINS JOE MANDUKE IbARTHUR PENN
COLOR by DeLuxe .AVNALMTEONPICTSTCRE U ted
UNDER 18? BETTER BRING Artists
A PARENT'

He criticized government bur- He explained that the combina- The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
eaucracy by speaking of informa- :tion of irresponsibility on the part Mihgan. News hone 64.Uni rsityo
tion on congressional committee of the government and the press Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
reports that goes "by way of a leads to "double culpability." igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
committee member's mouth Into After condemning the media, day through Sunday morning Univer-
committee members 'ears without Wirtz offered suggestions, includ- sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
passing through their minds;" and ing free or inexpensive TV time carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
Sthrough Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3,00 by carrier, $3.00 by
I ~ A~LJ~ mail.

I-_. _ .

I

11

WASHINGTON (P) - Congress
gave final approval yesterday to a
bill designed to encourage banks
to make federally guaranteed
loans to college students.
House passage by a 326 to 10
vote completed action on the bill,
which would provide an incentive
allowance for the banks equal to
an additional three per cent in-
terest.
The legislation was made neces-
sary by the recent increase in the
prime interest rate to 8,2 per
cent. The present law limits the
interest rate on student loans to
7 per cent. If the full allowance
were paid, banks would get 10 per
cent.
, -

\ HOMECOMING

UNL7CUKVjUrqU AitI Mt:i
PPFTH FOI'UM

'69

PROUDLY PRESENTS
-RICHIE HAVENS

LAURA NYRO

-- SWEETWATER

flicks & jams
This Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17 and 18-11:00 P.M.
Not continuous with "Alexander" - separate admission
"BLACK ZERO"
An underground feature in color which
demonstrates that split-screen dual-pro-
jection can be used more creatively than in
"Chelsea Girls"
POETRY: LEONARD COHEN
MUSIC: VELVET UNDERGROUND
"A masterpiece! The finest experimental
film in two generations!" - Boston Avatar
"This 1 st Prize winner is without question

3020 Woshtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES
Wednesday-i -3-5-7-9
Thurs., Fri.,Mon., Tues-7-9
Saturday & Sunday-5-7-9

Saturday, November 1-8:30 P.M.

October 16-17
JUDEX
dir. GEORGE FRANJU (1963)
FIRST ANN ARBOR SHOW-

ALL EVENTS BUILDING

TICKET PRICES:

$5.00, 4.00, 3.00

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