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October 16, 1969 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-16

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 16, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 16, 1969
'a

Women

sit in

at

Ann Arbor

draft

O ice

By SHARON WEINER
Members of women's liberation groups yesterday sat in
at the Ann Arbor draft board for three hours protesting the
Vietnam war.
About 30 women, chanting slogans, passed leaflets
throughout the building and talked with the employes.
The leaflets called for the members of the draft board
to "adopt a policy of non-cooperation with the selective
service system," and demanded a strike by the members of
the board.
The group talked with Detective Lt. Eugene Staudenmeier
of the Ann Arbor police. Staudenmeier later said the group
swas not creating a disruption.

-Daily--Jay Cassidy

Regents to
meet today
nCorn inud i iffm Page 1)
Wright adds that the Univer-
sity should seek a formal ruling
from the revenuĀ° commissioner to
determine whether the books are,
in fact, tax exempt.
Meanwhile, the Regents them-
selves seem unsure what to make
of the newest bookstore propos-
al. Most admit they have not had
much opportunity to study the
product of student-faculty-adinin-
istration negotiations.
And it seems likely that the vote
will rem in split at this meeting
much as it did at the last meet -
ing, when a University discount
store was endorsed in principle by
a 5-2 vote.
Regents William Cudlip (R-
irosse Pointed, who was not pre-
ent at the last meeting, Robert
Brown (R-Kalamazoo) and Paul
Goebel i R-Grand Rapids', a r e
still unalterably opposed to es-
tablishing a diecount bookstore.
But Regents Otis Smith (R-De-
troit) and Robert Nederlander 'D-
Birmingham, another bookstore
supporter, both point out that
they remain open to any new pro-
posal on the question and both say
they are willing to consider a new
compronis?.
But one drawback of the new
proposal is that. it has failed to
secure strong backing from Pres-
ident Robben Fleming. Although
Fleming has met with student and
faculty drafters of the proposal.
he has not publicly committed
himself to supporting it.
And this could be important.
Most Regents value the presi-
dent's opinion and are influenced
by what he thinks.

"Our presence there effectively
disrupted the functioning of that
office," said Randall Clarke, '72.!
"We were continually singing and
marching in the hall.''
The leaflet passed to the em-
ployes of the draft board begins,,
"We as women join this national
day of protest against the war in
Vietnam. We believe it is impor-
tant for women to demonstrate
as a group because women have
never assumed a decisive political
role in American society.
The statement calls for women
to refuse "to cooperate, on all
levels with a war effort that seeks
to deny to other peoples the right
to form their own political and
personal identities. The draft is
one highly visible part of that
war effort."
Before picketing the d r a f t'
board, the group picketed the Ad-:
ministration Bldg. protesting a
statement issued by the Office of
Academic Affairs which allows
academic staff to strike without
loss of pay but no non-academic
staff.
"The majority of non-academic
personnel on the campus are'
women," explained Miss Clarke.
"Women are effectively discour-
aged from political expresison,"
the leaflet distributed in the Ad-
ministration Bldg. stated. "We
have little opportunity to control
our lives and to affect decisions
which intimately affect us. In this
society, represented here by the
University, women are considered
slaves or children with no opin-
ion or knowledge about the Viet-
nam war, or about the possibility
of understanding and improving
their situation as women in this
oppressive society."
"This is the first time Ann Ar-
bor women have taken political
action as a cohesive group," said
Miss Clarke.

Rally goers cheer for peace

Million across nation protest
U.S. involvement in Vietnam

Students
o)serve
strike
(Continued from Page 1)
"Let us not disband in celebra-
tion when the Vietnam war ends,"
warned Hart. "We must stay to-
gether to do something even more
important-we must stay together
so we can stop pouring an incred-
ible amount into the Pentagon and
stop our incredible indifference to
the rest."
There was a brief disturbance
when a man from the audience
interrupted Hayden's speech. The
man resisted the efforts of plain-
clothes p~olicemen to restrain him.
Parts of the audience shouted,
"Let him speak," while others
shouted Hayden to continue. The
man spit on Hayden and said af-
terwards he considered Hayden a
murderer because he was encour-
aging the North Vietnamese in
their killing of American soldiers.
"Tonight marks a turning point
for all those interested in a new
social order in this country," said
Conyers.
He urged students to "flex your
political muscle" and promised to
vote against all authorizations for
military procurement until nation-
al priorities w e 1' e reordered.
"Where is your Congressman to-
night?" asked Conyers.
"Vietnam is a symptom of a
diseased foreign policy" said Rep.
Craig. "Our momentum must be
used to see that our foreign policy
of military adventurism ends. The
task is up to you." he said.
Young called the moratorium
"the greatest demonstration for
peace in the history of America."
"It is you, the youth of Amer-
ica," said Young, who have been
responsible for whatever moral
direction and integrity this coun-
try has maintained."
New Mobe organizer Gene Glad-
stone warned of attrinpts to co-opt
the anti-war movement. -Our
cause is the immediate withdrawal
from all American troops from
bases all over this world," he said.
New Mobe co-chairman Douglas
Doud urged students to commit
themselves to a long struggle to
change America.
"We've embarked on a life-long
fight to change this system," said
Doud. "There's been too much talk
about Vietnam as if it was divorced
from the system as a whole. Viet-
nam is the sort of thing this coun-
try has to do to stay the way it is."
The audience displayed the
greatest enthusiasm for the SRC,
a local rock group.

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(Continued from Page 1)
to hear Mrs. Martin Luther King
condemn the war.
"We spend billions of dollars
for destruction in Vietnam," sheI
said, "but we refuse to recognize3
the necessity for life at home."
She said the war has destroyed
the hopes of black and poor
Americans.
After her speech, the protesters
marched four and five abreast in
a candlelight parade up Pennsyl-
vania Avenue to the White House.
In front of the mansion, Mrs.
King lighted a foot-high candle.
The procession was orderly and
the marchers obeyed traffic sig-
nals and police instructions.
In Detroit, mounted police were
called to unsnarl traffic and con-
tain a crowd of about 5,000 drawn
to Kennedy Square for a pro-
test. Some scattered incidents of
violence broke out when a mili-
tant right-wing organization,
Breaktllrough, ioved in for a
counter-demonstration.
In New York City, Mayor John
Lindsay, who had proclaimed the
day a day of mourning, ordered
the flags flown at half-mast. He
was ch'gyred as he told a Green-
wich Village crowd that the Nixon
administration was on a "dan-
gerous, self-defeating course."
Lindsay was attacked for his
actions by his two opponents in
the city's mayoral race. Republi-
can candidate John Marchi call-
ed Lindsay's proclamation "a New
York version of Dunkirk." Demo-
crat Mario Procaccino called it
"ill-advised."

More than 10,000 persons jam-
med the Wall Street area for a
demonstration which included the
reading of a -list of names of the
American soldiers killed in the
war.
Bill Moyers, press secretary to
former President Lyndon B. John-
son and now publisher of the Long
Island newspaper Newsday, called
the moratorium a "coming to-
gether, at last, against the divis-
iveness that has riddled us since
the advent of the war."
In Chicago, where the 'Chicago
8' are being prosecuted for their
actions in last year's Democratic
convention demonstrations, Fed-
eral Judge Julius Hoffman a n d
marshals thwarted attempts by
the defendants, except for T o in
Hayden, to commemorate t h e
day.
The defendants appeared in
court wearing black armbands
and one of them began reading
a roster of the war-dead, but was
stopped.
Hayden, national founder of
Students for a Democratic So-
ciety, last night spoke at the sta-
dium rally in Ann Arbor.
Defendant D a v i d Dellinger
jumped to his feet later in the
proceedings and asked for a mo-

ment of silence in respect for the
war dead, but was shouted down
by the prosecution attorney and
the judge.
In St. Paul, Minn.. former Vice,
President Hubert Humphrey at-
tended a moratorium rally at
Macalester College, where he
teaches part-time. He did not
speak, but listened to Prof.
Thomas Grissom call the U.S. gov-
ernment "the primary obstacle to
peace in the world."
Sen. Eugene McCarthy +D-
Minn) , who sought the presi-
dential nomination last year as an
anti-war candidate, spoke to
10 000 persons at Rutgers Uni-
versity, New Brunswick, N.J.
McCarthy declared that al-
though Nixon might hold military
withdrawal from Vietnam to be
a disaster, history "would call it
a sign of great statesmanship."
In Vietnam the only battlefield
protest reported reported was the
wearing of black armbands by
members of a platoon of U.S. in-
fantrymen on patrol near Chu
Lai, some 360 miles northeast of
Saigon. There was no way -of
knowing immediately, however, if
there were similar antiwar ex-
pressions by other GTs scattered
throughout the country.

FIRST FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION
CLOSED OCTOBER 15
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SAT., OCT. 18-9 P.M. to 1 A.M.
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TICKETS ON SALE AT DISCOUNT RECORDS-$3.00
Ann Arbor-Gateway to the World of Blues

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