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October 16, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-16

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Teaching fellows to consider unionization

1969-70 THE 1969-70
EASTERN
MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS SERIES
a tuneful delight
PAINT YOUR WAGON
Oct. 31-Nov. 2 and Nov. 5-8
amercia's most searching drama
DEATH OF A SALESMAN
December 10-14
brecht's multi-media anti-war explosion
MOTHER COURAGE
March 5-8
sauciest comedy of a saucy age
THE COUNTRY WIFE
May 20-24
SEASON COUPON SEASON COUPON
BOOKS BOOK HOLDERS
-Still only $5.00-save 29% over
-stll $5.0 the individual
for four great plays ticket price
---et first choice
PERFORMANCES of performances
IN THE and locations
QUIRK AUDITORIUM -exchange their
coupons (and order
-box office open guest tickets if
weekdays 12:45- desired) a full
4:30 p.m. week ahead of
Information: 482-3453 open sale
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY THEATRE
YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN 48197
Please Send _ _ EMU Plovers 1969-70 Season Coupon Books
of the Total Price Per Book of $5.00 for the Four Plays

By JIM BEATTIE
Graduate students in the political
science department will meet at noon
today in the Institute for Social Re-
search to discuss the formation of a
college-wide union of teaching fel-
lows.
The union, if formed, would be
aimed at bettering the salaries and
working conditions of teaching fel-
lows in all departments of the liter-
ary college, according to Bruce
Greenberg, a teaching fellow in the
Residential College.
In addition, organizers plan to
begin circulating forms among LSA
teaching fellows today seeking sig-

natures of support for the formation
of a union. The signatures would set,
in motion government machinery
which would officially determine the
nature and affiliation of the union.
"When a certain percentage of the
teaching fellows have expressed the
desire to form a union, the State
Labor Mediation Board is obligated
to hold election to determine whether
the teaching fellows wish to affiliate
with a national union," explains
Gerald Faye, professor of political
science at Oakland Community Col-
lege and lecturer in the University's
School of Social Work.
According to Greenberg, the union
would have three objectives.

First, it would ask for a fair level
of income for teaching fellows.
Currently, teaching fellows at the
University who teach half-time (20
hours per week) receive salaries
ranging from $2900 to about $3100
for nine months.
Half-time faculty members, on the
other hand, teach only three hours
per week and receive between $5000
and $6000.
The union would also seek to make
teaching fellows' authority commen-
surate with'their responsibility.
"In many departments," Greenberg
says, "teaching fellows do more than
half of the teaching, but their au-

thority to decide course content,
course procedure and the size of their
classes is often very minimal."
In addition, the union will attempt
to improve the conditions under
which fellows currently teach. Class
size and contract hours will be the
chief targets in this area, says Green-
berg.
Although Greenberg anticipates
some University resistance to the
union's demands, he does not expect
much opposition to the formation of
the union itself.
"Under federal regulations, work-
ers are guaranteed the right to or-
ganize, and employers are forbidden
to interfere with such activity," he

says. "In any case, the University is
unlikely to object."
Unionization has also been success-
fully attempted at other large state
universities. At the University of Wis-
consin, significant improvements in
both salaries and working conditions
were secured soon after the forma-
tion of a teaching fellows' union
earlier this year.
In addition, Faye points out that
the salaries at Oakland Community
College, which he helped organize
three years ago, are three to six
times higher for instructors with ed-
ucational backgrounds similar to
University teaching fellows.

t 0'NEWS PHONE: 764-052
seacn tro t Bage IUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, October 16, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

-1

the
news tday
by The Associted Preand C oil. e , 'ririce'

U' OFFICIALS MEET

Discount

Store

Name_

Telephone-

Street_ __ _

Ci__ ty

State .em_ __ ____ ._ Zip Code -
I Enclose a Stamped, Self-Addressed 4"x9 2" Envelope Plus
Check or Money Order (Payable to the EMU Theatre) Totalina
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
at Eastern Michigan University

THE PRESIDENT of the Somali Republic was assassinated.
Dr. Abdirashid Ali Shermarke, who was the African coun-
try's president since June, 1967, was shot yesterday afternoon in Mog-
adishu, the capital, by a man wearing a police uniform. He died im-
mediately, Radio Mogadishu reported.
According to a later report, a dusk to dawn curfew was imposed
in Mogadishu, and security officers were patrolling the streets.
THE WELFARE REFORMS proposed by President Nixon
were criticized at a congressional hearing.
At the first hearing by the House Ways and Means committee
on Nixon's proposed $4.4 billion welfare program, two Democratic
committee members charged that the measure would not aid aband-
oned children or teenage mothers.
The President's proposal would replace the various Aid to De-
pendent Children programs with a uniform family assistance plan
that would guarantee the average family of four a minimum income
of $1,600 per year.
SIX EXPLOSIVES blasted the Beirut office of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
It was not immediately clear who fired the explosives, and no
arrests were reported.
However, yesterday's incident follows several reciprocal acts
of terrorism by both Israeli and Arab commandos.
* *
THE SEVEN COSMONAUTS orbiting the earth will probably
not construct a space platform.
Observers in Moscow said yesterday that the content of news
reports from Tass, the official Soviet news agency, indicates that
Soyuz 6, 7, and 8 will merely test techniques for future establishment
of orbiting space laboratories.
Various sources had said earlier that Soyuz 7 and 8 would linkt
up as the first step in constructing a space platform.
However, as of early this morning, Moscow time, the two space-
craft had only maneuvered to within 50 yards of each other. Official
announcements said all three spacecrafts were working normally,
and the crews were in fine condition,

("THE FILM IS PURE CINEMA
VERITE! AN ENGROSSING FILM,
A REAL ACCOUNT OF AN ARTIST
.4T'S WHAT'S HAPPENING!"
"AN ESSAY IN CINEMATIC TRUTHTELLINGr'
AA HARROWING, MEMORABLE
DEPICTION.,.ENDLESSLY FASCINATING
"THE FLM PULLS NO PUNCHES! AS
ENIGMATIC, CONTROVERSIAL, AND
SHONEST AS ITS SUBJECT:
c . M ,c
DB B0

solverit
By JIM McFERSON
A meeting of high Univer-
sity officials yesterday found
the University Discount Store
to be in "solid" financial
shape, despite earlier fears to
the contrary.
According to store manager
Dennis Webster, a financial re-
port distributed during the meet-
ing showed that the store realized
a profit of more than $5,000 in
jSeptember.
The purpose of the meeting,
which was initiated by Regent
Robert Brown (R-Kalamazoo)
was to discuss the financial con-
dition of the ten-month-old store.
Participating in the meeting
were BrWwn, Vice President f or
Student Affairs Barbara Newell,
Webster, and Harlan Mulder, As-
sistant to Vice President for fin-
ancial Affairs Wilbur K. Pier-
Pont.
Brown said last week he feared
the store was in deep financial
trouble. However, after yesterday's
meeting he indicated that he was
satisfied with the store's present
operation.
"Things seem to be under con-
trol," he said. "I couldn't find very
much wrong."
Brown added that most of the
questions raised about the store
P had been resolved.
Press According to Webster, the main
envig problem has been a lack of com-
scene munications between the store, and
the administration and Regents.
However, the meeting appar-
ently cleared up most of the mis-
understandings which existed.
Webster said he hoped that fu-
ture problems could be avoided.
! "If we can continue to hold
periodical meetings such as this,
and continue with our present solid
financial condition, there will be
um Ian few problems," he commented.
n t h e The discount store was initiated
a study last January. Originally located in
emical the Student Activities Building,
blind- it was moved to its present loca-
tion in the Union at, the start of
f t h e the present term.
the' di-
n war-
cal ef-Psych conference
etnam-
tool to "The Michigan Psychological As-
sociation will focus on contempor-
o real- ary social issues at its annual con-
nds the ference in Ann Arbor on Friday,
t as a Oct. 17.
im-aThe principal morning speaker
h at the Statler-Hilton Inn will be
Zweif- literary college Dean William L.
Hays.

-Associated
MINNEAPOLIS POLICE arrest a woman on the Minneapolis Mall after Mayor Charles Ste
ordered the Mall cleared of moratorium participants. The police said the woman used "obs
language."

SYMPOSIUM ON VIETNAM

Ackley
(Continued from Page 1) .
ten years, Cohen discussed t h r e e
areas he believed were most cruc-
ial--education, health and pover-
ty. There are nearly 60 m i111Io n
people currently in the educa-
tion system, Cohen said. "We are
spending seven per cent of the
GNP on all education and that's
far short of what is necessary."
At yesterday's chemicul biologi-
cal warfare (CBW) symposium,
speakers described gas and germ
warfare as a threat "to the sur-
vival of mankind in this planet."'
Over 3500 people in Hill Aud.
heard Prof. Irwin Goldstein of
the medical school talk about the
use of CBW in Vietnam, and its
perils.

Cohen speak on costs of war

Later an overflow crowd filled
the Natural Science Aud. to hear
remarks by seven profesors a n d
teaching fellows on the topic ofI
chemical biological weapons.

using CS and CN tear-gases in
Vietnam. He claimed they are
used to kill people in connection
with other lethal weapons.
Goldstein explained that people

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It
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DONT LOOK BACK
A i(trBy . A. P ~$~
#~T tAON)

"Our country has developed the are uu'ien out of eaves ana unk
most heinous kind of weapons ever ers by gas and then bombed or
invented' by the brilliant mind of strafed. He said gas concentra-
man," said zoology Prof. Robert tions injected underground are
Beyer, moderator of the sympos- so high that an Australian died of
asphyxiation.
I s k HGoldstein said the U.S. has de-
In hsd tlk at Hil hAud d - foliated 16 per cent of the for-
stein said the U.S. has admitted,
using CS and CN tear-gases in ests in South Vietnam. In 1966,
Vietnam. He claimed they are according to Goldstein, an area
!Vied t H kieclied thetarn the size of Vermont was sprayed
used to kill people in connection with herbidicides.
with other lethal weapons. " f lt .-hp ;,4,

are hurt," Goldstein added. "The
enemy forage for food and it's the
weak, the sick, the children, and
pregnant women who suffer."
He warned of the peril involved
in having huge CBW stockpiles on
hand. Goldstein said over 100
million lethal doses of nerve gas
are stored out in the open at the
Rocky Mountain Arsenal in Col-!
orado.
Goldstein urged the U.S. to rat-
ify the 1925 Geneva agreement
banning CBW and to start nego-
tiations to stop further CBW de-
velopment.
He advised scientists to refuse
to do CBW research and called
upon the University to stop all
classified research.

At the afternoon symposi
MacLeon, an instructor i;
medical school, described a
he made -showing that ch
mace can cause permanent
ness.
Dr. Andrew Zweifler, o
medical school, spoke of 1
lemna of the physician it
fare. He said the U.S. medi
fort in Vietnam to help Vi(
ese civilians is a political
win them over to our side
"The physician begins t
ize the problem when he fir
Army considering him no
healer but as someone wl
proves combat efficiency,"
ler said.

In his talk at Hill Aud. G oaI d-
stein said the U.S. has admitted

ve eit smay oe a gooa e ia
to deny food supplies to the
enemy, they are not the ones who

UNDERGROUND AT THE
Pirf;TH 'orLJM

flicks & jams
This Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17 and 18-11:08 P.M.
Not continuous with "Alexander" - separate admission
"BLACK ZERO"
An underground feature in color which .
demonstrates . that split-screen dual-pro-
jection can be used more creatively than in
"Chelsea Girls"
POETRY: LEONARD COHEN
MUSIC: VELVET UNDERGROUND
"A masterpiece! The finest experimental
film in two generations" - Boston Avatar
"This 1 st Prize winner is without question

t

STATE * N OW*
2nd WEEKI
Program Information 662-6264

SHOW
Thursda
at
1, 3, 5,'
9 P.M.
Friday
and
Saturda
at
1, 3, 5
7, 9 P.A
AND
11 P.M.
Soon
"EASY

S
.r
7

where the heads of all nations meet
yALICE'S
RESTAURANT"

f
3y

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r
i
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i
i
i
i
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i

Thurs., Oct. 16, 1969

8:30 P.M.

AT THE HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.

I'' 4

MICHAEL AKZIN
"Politics and Politicians in Israel
Followed by Discussion, and Refreshments

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2 (i
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a 1!\ * tr4
2.
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-.- .a04CSC "w* tS$

BEGINS TONIGHT
at 8:00
Intermediate

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