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October 15, 1969 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-15

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Wednesday, October 15, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

BROADoSIDE
by robin wright

Green 'incentive aids gridmen

Your'e come a long way
baby, but .. .
WE'RE STILL FIGHTING.
Yep, the age old struggle for emancipation of the woman
has not stopped yet.
One of the latest causes is to obtain the right for female
journalists to grace the premises of athletic press boxes, playing
fields and locker rooms (hum-m-m-m-m).
Now even though it seems to be a trivial and almost ir-
relevant problem considering the many serious issues of today,
somebody upstairs has deciied it important enough to argue
about.
Letting a woman reporter in a press box became a national
issue last summer when columnist Eleanor Kane, despite com-
plete press credentials, was denied a permit for the annual Yale
bowl game between the Giants and the Jets.
ONLY AFTER several appeals, including one to the president
of Yale, and a threatened court suit, was Miss Kaine granted per-
mission to sit among the men, compared to whom she is equally
qualified.
It seemed rather silly that the officials involved should be
so concerned about one innocent girl. Sitting in the press box
she certainly couldn't disturb or distract the players on the field
far below. And she surely didn't bother her serious, level-headed
colleagues, or could she now ... .
Anyway, the problem also has local application since there
was a similar incident at Michigan last year and again at the
opening of the grid season this year. It seemed that there was
some ridiculous tradition about women reporters in the press
box and female photographers on the field.
BUT TRADITIONS are the toughest thing to break, and
these proved no exception.
It all began at the end of the football season last year when
the junior Daily sports staffers traditionally (what hypocrites we
all are) were allowed to sit in the press box to get the hang of
writing covers, side-bars, columns etc. about the game.
One of the juniors was a seriously committed female sports
writer. When it came for her to sit with her colleagues, the
unspoken role of no women in the press box arose.
Although the first response was a flat+ "no," things looked
a little more like compromise after the chiefs of the athletic
department were alerted to the 14th Amendment of the federal
constitution which states:
"No state ..,.shall . . . deny to any person within its juris-
diction the equal protection of the laws."
THE SPORTS EDITOR of the Daily then knocked heads
with the publicity department and the new athletic director and
reached an agreement with only minor fuss and a one game
delay: the young lady would be allowed on the premises if she
agreed to remain inconspicuous.
The matter seemed completely resolved with all sides con-
tent that justice had been done - until the question of a female
photographer on the field arose at the Vanderbilt game this
year.
It seemed that the lady might get in the way of the profes-
sional press of whom she was never (unfairly!) considered an
equal. Of course her big floppy colorful hats are such an ob-
struction to a photographer trying to cover a football game with
only 100 yards of sideline to shoot from.
ALTHOUGH REFUSED press box facilities by a patrolman
at the game, she garnered up enough nerve to insist upon her
right to stay on the field. After being on the sideline less than
five minutes she was approached by a field checker who request-
ed that she leave.
Deciding to consult her fellow Daily photographers before
taking a stand, she promised to return and let the checker know
her answer. She naturally obtained backing from her peers,
along with promises that should she be bodily thrown off they
would cover the event in the paper.
Thus she returned with a negative reply to the checker, who
was so startled that she would deny his request that he simply
slithered away stammering "ah, oh, well, ah hum-m-m, yea."
THE NEXT STEP was a confrontation with a Sanford se-
curity field guard who threatened involuntary bodily removal
if the lady photographer refused to leave the field. Shaking, and
with tears in her eyes she stood firm, fearing a serious encounter
with other armed guards.
As it turned out, the security guard had no more desire
than the field checker to abuse the young lady, so she remained
on the field for the rest of the game. (You see, we can make
them back down once in awhile!)
But the story keeps going for the tradition is not one ex-
clusively at Michigan. In fact, most college and professional
athletic press boxes exclude-or more truthfully, discriminate
against women,
The challenge will again be taken on as the Daily attempts
to integrate the press box at Michigan State during the game
this Saturday.
LIKE OTHER press tags, MSU's state "no women, children
or dogs [as if they are all in the same category] allowed in the
press box".
Although MSU has a new liberal acting president who is
sympathetic to student efforts and despite MSU's desire to at
least match Michigan's accomplishments in the field of ath-
letics. it looks like there may be a challenge to a female's right
to sit with her equals again.
But let's hope not. Civil rights suits are so messy, in addi-

tion to the bad name they give an institution these days.
Then again, it almost follows that MSU might not match
Michigan's liberality in allowing females their rights since the
Spartans will never meet the Wolverine's standards on the
playing field itself .

By CHRIS TERASl
"I know it sounds funny," saidC
Michigan coach Bo Schembechler
playing the typical cautious-coach-
before-the-big-game role, "butl
Michigan State has a tougher de-
fense than Purdue. In fact, this
one may be harder to win'than
the last one of the season," he
added referring to Ohio State.
With regard to his own squad,
though, Schembechler assumed a
more optimistic stance. "We came
out of the Purdue game in sur-
prisingly good shape," he report-
ed. Curtis is fine - he was only'
knocked flat out cold last Satur-
day. Phil Seymour is going full
speed, but I can't say if he'll start
against State."
"Glenn Doughty is completely
over his injury," Schembechler1
continued. "We're just happy to
have him back practicing. He
didn t run an offensive play last
week before Purdue.
The Spartans, on the other
hand, with defensive back Gary
Parmentier and end Gordon Bow-
dell lost for the season, are in
somewhat worse physical shape.

But Schembechler reverted to his
cautious self when asked about
even these State weaknesses and
refused to comment on how he
planned to take advantage of any
of them.
Furthermore, if the Michigan
Mandich gains
AP honor
Michigan has had some great
ends like Jack Clancy, Bennie
Oosterbaan, and Ron Kramer,
and, another name may soon have
to be added to the list if tight end
Jim Mandich has some more
games like his Purdue showing,
Mandich grabbed 10 passes'
against the Boilermakers for 156
yards and one score. These ac-
complishments earned him the
Associated Press's Lineman of the
Week Award.
The 6-3, 220-pound senior from
Solon, Ohio, now has 20 recep-

mentor plans any lineup changes,
he is not talking about these
either. He did concede, though,
that he was impressed with soph-
omore running back Bill Taylor,
who gained 50 yards in 13 tries
against Purdue, including a 24-
yard burst to set up Michigan's
third touchdown.
Schembechler has Taylor and
the rest of the varsity going
against freshman outfitted in
green shirts bearing the numbers
of certain State players.
daily
sport s
NIGHT EDITOR:
MORT NOVECK
This maneuver is undoubtedly a
hit of Tilhnnrl Alaian kl

Jinn ifladich (88)

b t oI psychologicai warfare, butr
tions for 262 yards. This gives him1 Schembechler would not admit t
a career sum of 89 catches, good doing anything special. This game
for second in the all-time Wol- has to mean something to you if
verine totals behind Jack Clancy's st
132, plus 1094 yards, and the third you re a Michigan man,' was all

AP POLL

Wolverines regain 13th spot

Beating the ninth-ranked team
does wonders for a team's ego, to
say nothing of suddenly increas-E
ing their value in the eyes of poll-
sters. Michigan's Wolverines, who
fell from grace after losing to Mis-
souri, managed to regain the 13th
spot they held two weeks ago on
the virtues of their 31-20 win over
the previously ninth-ranked Pur-
due Boilermakers.
The loss sent Purdue tumbling
to 17th spot. The Boilermakers
were joined in their fall to the
Second Ten by Oklahoma and
Georgia who also loft.

UCLA,, Louisiana State and
Florida were the teams whose per-
formances earned them the right
to move into the Top Ten. These!
three occupy the eighth, ninthI
and tenth positions, respectively.
As expected Ohio State held'
onto first place with a very com-
fortable margin over Texas and
31 first place votes. The Long-
horns received five first place
votes after their 27-17 victory
over Oklahoma.
Southern California and Arkan-

sas switched places with the Tro-
jans moving into third place.
Southern Cal will have their
hands full this weekend as they
meet 11th ranked Notre Dame.
The Irish base their whole season
on the poll results and are itching
to reappear in the Top Ten.
Penn State continued to round
out the Top Five while Missouri
moved up one spot to sixth. Ten-
nessee, which had been tenth, ad-
vanced three positions after de-
feating Georgia Tech 26-8.

spot in this category.
Employing a very well-used
comment, Mandich said, "It's a
great honor," but he did con-
tinue, "most of my interest lies
with the team. We're well on our
way to a conference champion-
ship.
"As far as pass-receivingtgoes,"
he added, "I would have to say
Saturday was my best game so
far, although I have blocked
better."
He said he felt the game un-
tracked him, as well as the team,
from the Missouri contest of
doldrums. "We got a tremendous
boost from this (Purdue) game,,
he said, "which was essential to
any Big Ten championship hopes."
Coach Bo Schembechler sum-
med up Mandich's value to the
i sua b sain. He's a very re-

a primer for the
NOW TilINKING
GENERATION,.
"CLIMBING TO
MANKIND SOLUTIONS"
by Julius Stulman
New creative methodology
for New Thinking Processes
Problem Solving Criteria
New Approaches to

he said. "And I'm just a rookie
at all this," he added modestly.
Yet the coach actually "looked
past" MSU to Minnesota. When
asked why he is moving practice
out of Michigan Stadium, he an-
swered, "For the Minnesota game
we'll be down on the other field
(the Tartan surface) next to
Yost Field House) because we have
lights there."
And what about the distant
future on past even the Gophers
to the Rose Bowl? Well, he said he
did not mind anybody else talking
about it, but as for himself:
'It's ridiculous," he practically
spit, "we have six tough teams
left and any one could . .."
Who has not heard the rest?
STOP
i THE
WARII0
The undersigned staff and stu-
dents of the Human Perform-
ance Center and the Deaart-
ment of Psychologv support the
October 15 Moratorium and call
for immediate American disen-f
aaaement from the Vietnam
war.
Robert Abramowitz
Gerald Gardner
Rich Jaqacinski
Vicki Cohen
Terry Armstronq
Rivka Fine
Don & Sue Walter
David H. Krantz
Morqaret Ackley
Thomas S. Wallsten
Henry M. Halff
Nancy F. Halff
Austin Adams
Jack Loomis
Ted Allen
Bloke Wattenbarqer
Douglas Stokes
Janet Robinson
Dennis Fryback-
Steven G& Marqery
Doehrman
R. M. Lawrence
Andy Rose
Suzanne Brumer
Anita & Robert Coplan
Don Rumelhart
Jim Chinnis
Linda Fensch
Marc Goldstein
Tim Salthouse
Jon Miller
Roqer Peters
David Birch
Don Hunt
Gene Herrmann
Brian Peterson
Klaus Rieqel
Michael F O'Connor
Jon Baron
Steve Mackay
J. Edward Russo
Patricia M. Curtner

I.
?
3.
4.
:
6.
7.
8.1
9.
10.
11.1
12 4e
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.1
18.
19.
20.

Ohio State 31
Texas 5
Southern California
Arkansas
Penn State
Missouri
U CLA
Louisiana State
Florida
Notre Dame
O kla homna
MICHIGAN
Georgia
Auburn
Wyoming
Purdue
Stanford
Mississippi
Alabama

3-0
4-0
4-0
4-0
4--a
4-0
4-0
4-0
4-0
3-1
3-1
3-1
4-0
>) *
3-1
3-1

710
638
478
458
423
391
3331
30
218
192
130
122
83
71
47
46
45
39
36
31

-j squaa y sayin g, yW-ties very re-
liable receiver," while Purdue
coach, Jack Mollenkopf, simply
C rid d P ic -i nstated, "We just couldn't stop
Mandich from catching the ball.
Once again, due to the benificence of The Daily, Grid Pickers This is one of the important rea-
have a chance to get one game right with no effort. As the Daily Libels In winning the award, Mandich
will certainly prove invincible once again, this time over the hapless beat out linebacker Marty Huff
state news, all that those desiring to add to their total need do is who had a few pass receptions
select the mighty Libels. himself. Huff intercepted three of
Woe unto them that pick the news, though. Mercy then takes a Purdue quarterback Mike Phipps'
one week vacation, in Egypt, and the offender is castigated by im- tosses. In addition, the Wolverjne
mediate disqualification, or worse. One of our hopeless sports trainees three Boilermaker fumbles lost to
tried picking the muggers last week and was rewarded with the Michigan.
assignment of stealing the Spartan statue from MSU, at noon this -
Saturday.
To make it even easier for our contestants, a guest selector's picks ,.......COUPON -------
are usually run. The Daily searched high and low through East Lans- I
ing for someone literate enough to read the list of games, but the M THOMPSONS
search was unsuccessful. Just in case you forgot thei, this week's
games appear below. tI77

"
"
0
"
0
S
S

Education
Oceanography
Urban Planning
Medical Care
Population Control
Transportation
Distribution

**!- -----------* C Ci"! i-!!-- 1.1-1 i"
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« Name
"
Address - _
State & Zip
Enclosed$ ($1 per copy)
THE WORLD INSTITUTE
'77 United Nations Plaza
New York NY..............10017

Knicks beat
Supersonics
NEW YORK (>'-The New York
Knicks ran away from the Seattle
Supersonics, 126-101, as the Na-
tional Basketball Association's
24th season began last night at
Madison Square Garden.
,an Wilkens made his debut as
player-coach of the Sonics who
were able to stay close for only
the first six minutes as Bob Rule
scored Seattle's first 11 points and
15 of the team's first 17.
And it marked the miraculous
return of New York's Dave Stall-
vorth, who had suffered a heart
attack two years ago.
Stallworth came off the bench
and contributed to the one-sided
victory, playing 14 minutes.
The Knicks staged an 18-3
burst in the opening quarter and
upped their lead to q6-38 just be-
fore halftime.

SHORT WAY LINES BUS

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

MICHIGAN at Michigan State
Illinois at Indiana
Iowa at Purdue
Ohio State at Minnesota
Wisconsin at Northwestern
South Carolina at Virginia
Tech
Tennessee at Alabama
Auburn at Georgia Tech
Colorado at Oklahoma
Kansas at Nebraska

11. Texas A&M at Texas
Christian
12. California at UCLA
13. Oregon State at Washington
14. Southern Cal at Notre Dame
15. Colgate at Princeton
16. Navy at Rutgers
17. Penn State at Syracuse
18. SMU at Rice
19. Oregon at Air Force
20. MSU News at DAILY LIBELS

V'ILLAI
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M on., Tues., Wed.,
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M--Go Blue
ANN ARBOR
TO
E. LANSING
WEEKEND SERVICE
GOING TO THE
STATE GAME?
GO BY:
SHORT WAY
BUS

Fri.
From A.A.
8:35 A JAX
10:15 A DIR
1:50 P JAX
2:05 P DIR
3:00 PBRT
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Sat. Sun,
From A.A. From
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Fromn -11:15 A DIR
E. Lan. 1:45 P DIR
4:35 P JAX 4:35 P DIR
7:35 P BR' 7:35 P DIR
All Trips Operate
From Ann Arbor
Bus Terminal
116 W. HIURON

DR. CLARK PINNOCK
"A Case For Biblical Infallibility"
Ugli Multipurpose Room
7:30 P.M.
FRIDAY, OCT. 17

DIR: Iirect JAX: Via Jackson
BRT: Via Brighton

We get carried away when
you come around...
and we love it !

0

.,.., _
e1

eta qnale
TIRED OF GETTING SCREWED?
Send your complaints on any subject
to this column and the best will be
printed each week.
Write to:
CRAIG WOLSON
Retail Advertising Mgr.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

WILL BE OPEN 7m2a
M'MMA wAAwW ~rw ~p r~ r~lwew +.w.yw~owwirrM- -++ M MAAww .w A~ .+.o.A
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