100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I_

NOW!
at Re ular
Prices

GMI

a a o o °**
00 o ° 00
o e o*
oo
People who see "Funny Girl
are the luckiest peoplei
the world.

iI'L~1Dial
5-6290
° TODAY at 1:30
and 7:30 P.M.
BARBRA OMAR
STREISAND -SAI
o °HE WILUAM WYLE
PAY STARK PRODUCTION~
n
, ~

seI~conud f rouit page

im4c

S iri3+n

43- titi

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0534

Sunday, October 12, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Lack of unity threatens Fraternity Buyers

SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERSI
October Amaizement {
Road Rallye
SUN DAY, OCTOBER 12
REGISTRATION: 10:30-12:00 noon at
the Auto Lab on North Campus

By HERB BOWIE
A a time of burgeoning student polit-
ical power, student buying power in
the form of the Fraternity Buyers' As-
sociation (FBA) is facing a serious
threat to its own existence.
The food buying cooperative, which
represents one half million dollars in
student money, is facing the most cru-
cial points in its 14-year history, ac-
cording to its officers.
"This is going to be the FBA's last
year unless it improves," says Bruce
Grimes, chairman of FBA's board of
directors.
Grimes sees the biggest problem
facing the FBA as the reluctance of
stewards from fraternities, sororities,
and co-ops to buy through the FBA
because they prefer to save money on

some items by shopping around and
looking for sales.
The organization's reputation suf-
fered a severe blow last March when
Sigma Nu steward Carl Stevens dis-
covered that Riopelle Packing Co., an
FBA-authorized meat dealer, was un-
der-weighing some of its meat ship-
ments.
Robert Harter, a Washtenaw Coun-
ty weights and measures official, later
verified Stevens' claim, weighing ship-
ments that he called "flagrant viola-
tions" of state law. The actual weights
of these meat deliveries were five to
10 per cent less that the stated weights.
During the summer the FBA Board
of Directors removed Riopelle from its
list of authorized dealers after Riopelle
had been fined $50 for under-weighing
meat shipments. Yet even after this

action by the FBA, many members still
deal with Riopelle.
This lack of support is characteristic
of FBA members. Interviews with nine
stewards found only two FBA members
that buy exclusively from authorized
dealers.
Grimes admits the FBA is now a
"mediocre" organization, but f;opes
that its new coordinator, Larry Nelson,
will help.the foundering FBA.
The first evidence of Nelson's initi-
ative was a food fair held early this
month. The exposition enabled FBA-
authorized dealers to display their
products to stewards and cooks from
the 54 member fraternities, sororities,
and co-ops. Prospective new members
were also welcomed at the fair.
Salesmen at the fair offered descrip-
tions, pictures, and samples of every-

thing from shish-kebob and sirloin to
eclairs and egg nog. The fair im-
pressed most of the stewards who at-
tended. Nearly all of them discovered
new items they wanted to try.
The FBA was started in 1955 because
of the need for a single group to bar-
gain for all of the fraternities. Today,
however, most fraternities regard the
FBA not as their bargaining agent
but as just another place to buy food,
Nelson says.
One of the objects of the food fair
was to make members aware of the
authorized dealers' products and ser-
vices. In this respect, it. seems to have
been at least partially successful.
Zeta Psi steward Larry Tinker has
been satisfied with thei for 15 years
and is reluctant to try a new campany.
At the fair, however, the cook found

that Rotunda Packing Co. offereC
many of the same services, s u c h as
helping her prepare her menu. S h e
also liked Rotunda's meat and Tink-
er says she might switch.
One factor which may make some
prospective members hesitate is t h e
deposit required by the FBA. Whether
members order through the FBA or di-
rectly from authorized dealers, all
billing is done through the FBA.
Nelson sees many ways in which the
FBA might expand, howeyer. One like-
ly possibility is the addition of dealers
in maintenance service such as plumb-
ers to FBA's list.
Other possibilities Nelson mention-
ed were starting a co-op student store,
authorizing furniture dealers, and co-
operating w i t h similar organizations
at other universities.

PRIZES:
TROPHIES-Howard Cooper Volkswagen
FOUR TIRES-Firestone
SPARK PLUGS and JACKETS-Champion
STEERING WHEEL COVER-Checkered Flag
I OIL-Standard Oil

i
i

I

CITY OFFICIAL PARALYZED:

j

'I

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Injury marks Weathermen march

In support of the Wednesday, Oct. 15 Moratorium
on the War in Vietnam, the Newman Student Asso-
ciation will hold aE
PEACE VIGIL
TUESDAY, OCT. 14,8:00 P.M -1:00 A.M.
ST. MARY'S CHAPEL
come any time for movies, discussions, speaker, readings, coffee
and cookies, Service of Reconciliation, Midnight Mass. Everyone
Welcome!
LAST 3 DAYS!
ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER! i&1 f FP'
W Oa FI
weo Mo mamxewor LEO TOLSTOY S
WARamLPEACE
MItWs f'Wt V wmwvt g M.f Io011 MN + ATm. 0.M...A.MO NY COi.8mc7k. e
NOW SHOWING-PART 11
"Natasha and Pierre-The Burning of Moscow"

THE UNITED STATES has confirmed its continued opposi-
tion to seating Communist China in the United Nations.
The U.S. began Oct. 2 to try to draw support for a resolution
reiterating its demand for a two-thirds vote on the issue in the Gen-
eral Assembly.
Diplomatic sources said yesterday seven countries had already
agreed to sponsor the resolution, and it would be handed into the
U.N. as soon as three more nations have agreed to sponsor it.
The U.S. resolution would have the assembly state that "any
proposal to change the representation.of China is an important ques-
tion" under its rules--which set out that an "important question"
cannot be decided by simpler majority but needs a two-thirds vote.
.* * * *
THE SOVIET UNION launched the Soyuz 6 spaceship into
earth orbit in what semi-official sources said was the start of a
program to construct the first space platform.
The Soyuz 6, manned by two cosmonauts, is supposed to rendez-
vous in space with two other spaceships which are to be launched this
weekend.
The additional spacecraft will also have two cosmonauts aboard.
The Soviet news agency Tass said one of the missions would bej
to experiment with welding in conditions of weightlessness, a possible,
indication that other spaceships would be joined permanently.
CZECHOSLOVAK COMMUNIST party chief Gustav Husak
told his country he had been a deceived supporter of ousted re-
former Alexander Dubeek.
He said Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev "opened my eyes" and
exposed Dubcek as "petite bourgeoise" and non-Marxist.
Husak pledged purges of Communists who had mistakenly backed
Dubcek, but he promised there would be no "chopping of heads."
It is important that the country and party should not think that
members of the present pro-Soviet leadership are merely "turning
with the tide," said Husak. "When I find out that things are dif-
ferent I change my standpoint, and this is not turning with the tide."
PRESIDENT NIXON met with military chiefs to confer on
Vietnam and will meet Monday with Henry Cabot Lodge, chief
U.S. negotiator at the Paris peace talks.
Nixon also met Friday with U.S. ambassador to Saigon Ellsworth
Bunker who reported progress in the Vietnamization of the war.
The immediate problem facing Nixon is how to maintain public
support for his Vietnam policy. Administration sources say the
President feels he is on the right course and is not going to change
policy because of get-out-of-Vietnam demonstrations.
STRIKING LABORERS at the Turin plant of the Lancia
automobile factory staged a wild-cat walkout and beat up union
officials who tried to intervene.

CHICAGO (X--A city official
was paralyzed last night after
being kicked in the head by a
member of a Students for a
Democratic Society demon-
stration.
Richard Elrod, assistant corpor-
ation counsel, was crippled after
he tackled a youth who b r o k e
away from a main group of dem-
onstrators during a rampage of
window breaking in the Loop.
A reporter near Elrod said that
after he tackled the youth, the
demonstrator squirmed free and
kicked Elrod in the right temple,
A spokesman at the University
of Illinois hospital said Elrod had
a small broken bone in his neck;
however, the spokesman added, it
is not yet known if paralysis will
be permanent.
The spokesman said Elrod had
a trachaeotomy.
Police arrested 103 persons at
the start and finish of the march
by SDS members who call them-
selves the Weathermen.
The march began in Haymarket
Square, west of the Loop, and was
to wind up four days of SDS dem-
onstrations. It was to end in'Grant
Park, scene of violent confronta,
tions between police and demon-
strators during the 1968 Demo-
cratic National Convention.
There appeared to be about as
many police as demonstrators
when the march moved east on
Randolph Street. The march turn-
ed south on LaSalle Street and
continued for two blocks to Madi-
son, where the marchers let out a
whoop and began throwing rocks
and bottles at windows.
The windows of Maxim's Res,
taurant at Madison a n d Clark
streets were smashed on the Madi-
son Street side. Windows of other
nearby shops also were shattered.
A brief flareup between police
a n d demonstrators occurred be-
fore the march began.
Five persons were arrested. Steve
Zucker, a s s i s t a n t corporation
counsel for Chicago, said one of
them was Mark Rudd, h e a d of
SDS at Columbia University.
A police official said the clash
resulted w h e n police recognized
several persons who were being
sought in connection with violence
Wednesday night and for the
beating of an undercover police-
man by SDS members Friday
n i g h t in a surburban Evanston
church.
The spokesman said other dem-
onstrators moved against the po-
lice to try to prevent the arrests.
Some club - swinging resulted
See SDS, Page 7

42.
-Associated Press

WEEKDAYS-2:00-8:00
SAT. and SUN.-1 :00, 4:30, 8:00

0 ;THF'orUMJ
rtwrrflU A v s-Ar,.4 uO

Police arrest SDS miarcher

SHOWS UNITED
ATE 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
Box office TS
9:20PM. PENT
Program Information 662-6264 9PRESENTS
ARLO GUTH RI E IN DELUXE COLOR
RATED R-If Under 18, You Must Brhng A Parent
*1
f c }
"ALICE 9S
RESAURNT

PENTAGON-INDUSTRY TIES
Study details military lobbying

WASHINGTON (A') - Students
who spent the summer studying
the Pentagon have come up with
what they say is an in-house

i
i
C
i

Four and a half million of Italy's workers were involved in con- memo detailing how a $4 million-
tract negotiations for shorter hours and higher pay in a country a-year military lobby works.
enjoying unprecedented good times. The document indicates a close
Labor Minister Carlo Donat Cattin, a former union leader, said working partnership between the
the strikers were going too far-"they have turned to inadmissable Pentagon and private industry in
fighting methods." the military drive to gain con-
He added that the government would be forced to intervene if the gressional approval of the projects
strikes continued to be marked by violence. it proposes.
The document is entitled "FDL
I D" 1,1, ea ff 4-1 -- ;c -f-"

subject and listed 10 congressmen
and former White House aide
Joseph Califano as scheduled for
future briefings.
The memo makes clear the na-
ture and number of briefings was
determined by how the individual
reacted to the proposal.
The Pentagon said it was
searching its file to determine
whether the document is bona fide
and declined comment until the
search, started Friday, is c o re-
plated.
The memo lists Roger Lewis of
General Dynamics as the m a n
who sounded out Sen. Edward M.
Kennedy and Rep. James A.
Burke, both Massachusetts Demo-
crats. General Dynamics' ship-
yard is located in Quincy, Mass.
Spokesmen for General Dyna-
mics and Lockheed said only t h e
men named in the document could
say whether or how the informa-
tion was passed to the Pentagon.

Both _ firms said the men were
unavailable for comment.
But one spokesman for a large
defense contractor said it could
be expected that the industry men
did call on the congressmen, since
the contract involved possible
thousands of jobs and the con-
gressmen would be eager to know
how the firms were faring in the
bargain.
General Dynamics said the
firms do not routinely furnish the
Pentagon with formal reports on
the responses of congressmen to
pending proposals. Nor do indus-
try men coordinate their activities
with Pentagon lobbyists, said the
spokesmen.
But one spokesman said it is
easily possible the congressmen's
responses would be passed along
informally during social or busi-
ness contacts between the indus-
try and military representatives.

ff
I{

A FEDERAL COURT changed its mind last night and
ordered Dane County, Wisconsin aithoritles to allow the Rev.
James E. Groppi to be freed from Jail on $500 bond,
The militant Roman Catholic priest posted the bail, and then
was taken to Milwaukee to face a hearing-possibly Monday-on
alleged violation of probationary terms stemming from a 1968 open
housing march conviction.
Groppi has been in jail since Oct. 2 when he received a citation
for his role in a welfare demonstration Sept. 29, during which about
2,000 university students and welfare recipients sat-in in the state
capitol building for 11 hours.

Public Affairs and is referred
to by the institute as "The FDL
Paper." It is dated Jan. 31, 1967,
when controversy over the Navy's
proposed $1-billion fast-deploy-
ment logistics-FDL-ship program
was reaching its climax.
"The FDL Paper" lists eight
congressmen and senators - in-
cluding Sen. Richard Russell,
chairman of the Armed Services
Committee - who had already
been sounded out on the

1 -~. ..---- ------------. -. - ------

=.11

An All-Time Great Double-Bill You Won't Believe . . .
not even while it's happening
"ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS"
at 7:30
Directed by DOUGLAS SIRK
Rock Hudson, Jane Wyman, Agnes Moorhead
THIS WAS THE 50's!
Sirk is the least known of the world's great directors. He has been called a
dilletante; he was, in fact, an aristocrat. Everything ordinary in his hands
become extraordinary. He lifted the "just plain movie" into the highest ranks
of cinema. You haven't seen a movie until you've seen a Sirk!
PLUS
The Legendary Josef von Sternberg'

is

E UROP E *I89
ROUND TRIP BOEING 707 JET
0 $50 deposit reserves seat
*@12 departure dates
* a wide variety of flights
and travel services
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
1231 South University-769-6871
a non-profit student cooperative

POSTERIS
APHRODITE'S CLOSETO
Great Wall Hangings
1309 SO. UNIVERSITY, NO. 6 761-7192
AFTER 5 P.H. AND WEEKENDS
STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND TOWNSPEOPLE
YOU ARE WELCOME
in the social hall of

The New Mobilization will be
canvassing in Ann Arbor be-
ginning at noon today. Organ-
izers will meet in the Student
Activities Bldg.
NATIONAL GE~NERAL CORPORATION '.
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FOX VILLBi
375 No. MAPLE PD. .769.1300
MON.-FRI .-7:20-9:30
-SAT. and SUN.-1:00-3:05-
5:10-7:20-9:30

GUI LDHOUSE
802 Monroe
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13
NOON LUNCHEON-25c

_ ___ _
ww

~JUMBO'.

I

r

i

131

F

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan