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October 10, 1969 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-10

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Friday, October 10, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

WXYZ Radio Presents
SERGIO MENDES
& BRASIL '66
Guest M.C.-Dick Purtan
SUNDAY, OCT. 26th
7:30 P.M.
MASONIC AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $3 50, $4.50, $5.50
Tickets available at Masonic Box Office and
all J.L. Hudson Stores. MAIL ORDERS: send
stamped, self-addressed envelope with check
or money order to: Masonic Box Office. 500
Temple Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48201.

Produced in
a~sociation with
AUDIO AkTS

JUNIOR YEAR PROGRAM:
Africa awaits 'U' students

fE
E
E
1
i

Nationwide support
for Oct. 15 activities

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Friday, October 10
NOON LUNCHEON-75c
Speaker: WILL MORROW,
Veteran of Vietnam War

("nntinued froth Page 1)
Ross says he hopes more blacks
will take advantage of the pro-
gram in the future. He points out
the great opportunity that JYA
affords to blacks and whites to
"build better relationships and
understanding among the citizens
of the U.S. and between citizens
of the U.S. and Africa."
Miss Turner is a type of "pilot"
student for the project. Besides
taking courses in black history,
psychology and applied socialj
work, she will work there to make
contacts with the University ofI
Ghana officials and help establish
the program for next year.
Miss Turner will also do re-
search at the university, develop-
ing a portion of it for her Ph.D.j
dissertation in a combined pro-
gram of psychology and social
work.
Miss Turner says she is "very

at THE HOUSE this week
1429 HILL ST.
FRIDAY, OCT. 10: RELIGIOUS SERVICES
WITH BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION-8:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12:
2-4:00 P.M.-ISRAEL FOLK DANCING
6:00 P.M.--DELI HOUSE
8:00 P.M.--GRAD COFFEE HOUSE Featuring PAM OSTERGREN
Singing Traditional Folk and Contemporary Music.
Refreshments
ALL ARE WELCOME. ADMISSION CHARGE-50c
MONDAY, OCT. 13: JEWISH PEACE FELLOWSHIP
Table and Information on Diag, 10:00 A.M.-3 :00 P.M. Daily
RADICAL JEWISH NEWSPAPER-OPEN
MEETING--WRITERS INVITED-8:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15: "IN SUPPORT OF THE
NATIONAL STRIKE TO END THE WAR IN VIETNAM
The Hillel Council Will Close the House from 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.
and Urges All Jewish Students to Participate in Strike Activities"
8:00 P.M.: MOADON, "Politics and Politicians in Israel,"
with Michael Akzin
MONDAY-THURSDAY: BEIT MIDRASH CLASSES
Registration Still Open.
TICKETS AVAILABLE for Concert by Yiddish Folk Singer Nehama Lifshitz,
Detroit, Oct. 22, 8:00 P.M. Contact Larry Schwartz, Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee, 769-1074.

excited" about her stay in Ghana.
She says she expects her experi-
ence there will be of great service
to her in her future work on black
studies programs.
"I share the growing interest
of Afro-American students in
learning about black cultures,"
she said, "and in acquiring knowl-
edge about African history and its
links with the history and culture
of black Americans."
"Being in a country that's pre-
dominantly black, where I would
not experience discrimination on
a racial basis will be a new experi-
ence for me. University courses
on Africa don't really give you
a good perspective on African cul-
ture," says Miss Turner.
"The influence of African cul-
ture is really being felt now in
the American culture," Miss Tur-
ner believes. "My being in Ghana
will give me a better look at the
historical linkages between the two
cultures."
Miss Turner says she will also
like to learn about the political,
social and economic perspectives
of the Ghanian students. She be-
lieves her stay would be especially
exciting, and perhaps dangerous,
in view of the social and political
turmoil now rocking Ghana.
Ross says he hopes the program
will purely academic, and will not
become embroiled in political dis-
putes. He believes that the nation-
al governments will leave the pro-
gram alone.
I~Qj fe
- ~ -- - -
S
O ,I

'U' aids moratorium

DL 75148

KAREN BETH sings,
lives, writes of today
with deep conviction.
All she asks is for you
to share her joys...
THE JOYS OF LIFE.

The program as "unofficially"
set up will continue until 19,75, at,
which time it will be reevaluated.'
A total of 435 students are to par-
ticipate in the program during
the five-year period.
The combined JYA African Ex-
change Program -- an exchange,,
already partially in effect, of fac-
ulty, graduate students, teachers
and fifth year students-will cost
$4,000,000 for the full five year.

(Continued from Page 1)
Pennsylvania Station. A me-
morial service for war dead will
take place at Riverside Church.
In Washington, a "meal of re-
conciliation will be held at
Georgetown University. At
George Washington University,
Dr. Benjamin Spock will ad-
dress a rally which will be fol-
lowed by a demonstration at

CO

Incredible New
Excitement on
Decca Records
and Tapes

Continued from Page 1)
partment are also supporting
the Oct. 15 action, although the
department as a whole took no
action, as previously reported.
On the student's side, t h e
Panhellenic Association Pres-
ident's Council Wednesday en-
dorsed the strike.
Wendy Kress, Panhel presi-
dent, says the association is do-
ing more than simply supporting
the strike.
"A concerted effort is be-
ing made to recruit sorority
girls to work on the strike
committees," she explained.,
The economics professors'
programs kick off a long day
- ..- ..~ ......~ ..- -~- ~ ~ ~ ~-
State Senate
cautions U'
about ROTC
Continued from Page 1)
Relations and Planning Arthur
Ross, declined comment last night
on the resolution.
However, classics Prof. Theo-
dore Buttrey said the resolution
"arises from a misapprehension of
what the faculty report is." But-
trey is co-chairman of the Senate
Assembly Academic Affairs Com-
mittee which recently issued the
faculty report on ROTC.
"It is a misapprehension of Sen-
ator Kuhn that the faculty com-
mittee has proposed reduction in
the ROTC program," Buttrey
pointed out.
"Our recommendation was re-
vision of the contractural agree-
ment between the University and
the Department of Defense by
which the non-academic nature of
military recruiting programs
would be recognized," Buttrey said.
"'The recommendations now
seems to coincide in large measure
with those of Defense Secretary
Laird's own ROTC committee,"
Buttrey added.
University attorneys were un-
available for comment as to whe-
ther the Senate resolution vio-
lates University autonomy.
they're X1

BUY NOW !
Prices Going Up
on White

of talks. Many departments have
activities pertaining to the
moratorium scheduled through-
out the day.
The medical school starts t h e
day off at 7 a.m. with speeches
at the entrance to University
Hospital on "Physicians and the
War."
At noon there will be a rally
of the medical community and
more speakers in front of the
hospital. In the evening the
movie "The War Game" will be
shown at the medical school.
Throughout the day, buttons
will be sold in front of the hos-
pital and black armbands will
be provided for employees who
support the moratorium b u t
who must keep the hospital in
operation.
The journalism department
will present a program at 2
p.m. in Trueblood Aud. on
"What the Media (should/
could/must) do in relation to
Vietnam."
The economics department
has more on the agenda, too,
with a forum on "The Vietnam
War and the Military Industrial
Complex" slated for 3 p.m. in
Room 101 of the Economics
Bldg.
The social work school will
hold a mass meeting of students
and faculty at 1 p.m. in True-
blood Aud. to be followed by a
set of workshops from 2 p.m. to
3.30.
The education school has
planned forums and panel dis-
cussions for the entire day on
"Guns and/or Butter," "The
Moral and Ethic Responsibility
of Students and Faculty regard-
ing the Vietnam War," and
"The Problems of Education at
Home and Abroad in Wartime."
Members of the history and
classical studies departments
will pool their talents to present
a discussion of "The Thucydides
and Vietnam" at 3 p.m. in 2009
Angell Hall.
The department of forestry in
the natural resources school will
host an open lecture on "Our
Many Vietnam Policies."
The music school will present
"The Role of the Creative Art-
ist in Effecting Social Change"
at a time and place to be an-
nounced.
Stanley Siegal of the law
school will present a program
at 1:30 p.m. in Hill Aud. on
"Ahe Vietnam Profiteers and
Who Foots the Bill."

the headquarters of the Selec-
tive Service Administration.
Here is a partial state-by-
state breakdown of scheduled
activities:
0 California -- President-
Kenneth S. Pitzer of Stanford
University has urged faculty and
students to take part in a cam-
pus convocation on the war,
with Nobel laureate Linus Paul-
ing among the speakers.
A two-hour convocation is al-
so planned at San Jose State
College and at the College of
San Mateo.
But President S. I. Haya-
kawa of San Francisco State
College has said it will be "busi-
ness as usual" on Oct. 15. Act-
ing Chancellor Robert E. Con-
nick of the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley has also said
the university will not partici-
pate in the moratorium but left
it up to the individual teachers
to decide whether to hold class-
es. A march from the campus
to downtown Berkeley will start
to be followed by a mass rally.
* Maine - Sen. George S.
McGovern (D-SD) will address
a rally at the University of
Maine, scheduled to last all day.
Sen. Edmund Muskie (D-Maine)
will speak at Bates College.
0 Massachusetts - McGov-
ern will address a rally on the
Boston Common. Sen. Edward
M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) will
speak at a luncheon sponsored
by the World Affairs Council.
Hays bars
discipline
forsi-i

.ar ac sal ne LougnLn e
tConti ned fronm Pag;e L> stuentson e o mm ittee h I ad
which vill take the form of a: tudena goodthe commit onal
letter in the near future-would maeago1aefradtoa
not affect his decision not to ini-student members.
tiate disciplinary proceedings. The proposed steering commit-
tee would "administer, coordinate
co danhRobertsdents lreadyeand control the work of the full
college arrested in the sit-in andto administratot. ers wofaculty
will not initiate disciplinary ac- and two students
tion. Robertson called the sessionss
"informal, relaxed talks about Spurr recommended yesterday
their reasons for getting involved." that Prof. Donald Michael a n d
Prof. Nelson G. Hairston join him
"The talks led to a better un- and acting natural resources Dean
derstanding on both sides," said Stephen Preston on the steering
Robertson. committee. A student group later
None of the six students from selected Bryan and Cajka as
the engineering.college have talk- steering committee members.
ed yet with Dean Gordon Van No final decision was made yes-
Wylen, who said last night he terday on adding students from
hopes "to develop a rapport and outside the natural resources
a relationship" with them, school to the review committee.
Van Wylen indicated he does Spurr said they could be brought
not "anticipate" pressing charges in "at any appropriate time and
against the students in University for any appropriate purpose."
courts. Van Wylen added he has This may be discussed by the
not yet decided whether he will review committee on Oct. 23 when
take further actions if the stu- it hears a panel discussion on en-
dents refuse to meet with him. vironmental science outside t h e
The other deans were not avail- school. Spurr asked faculty mem-
able yesterday for comment. The! bers of the committee in t h e
students who voted for the resolu- schools of engineering, law, and
tion Wednesday have not yet been public health and in the literary
contacted by their deans. college to participate.

Ni study
unit to add
6 students
By PAT MAHONEY
The review committee which
is re-evaluating programs of
the natural resources school
yesterday asked Vice Presi-
dent for Academic Affairs Al-
lan F. Smith to add six stu-
dents to the 16-member group
and to create a smaller, six-
man steering committee for
the study.
The committee currently con-
sists of 13 faculty members a n d
three students. Students in the
school were dissatisfied with this
representation and presssed the
committee to add more student
members.
Dean Stephen Spurr of the
graduate school, who is chair-
man of the review committee,
said yesterday he saw no reason
why Smith would not approve the
recommendations.
The review committee was ap-
pointed last July by Smith to re-
assess "the program of the na-
tural resources school, its rela-
tionship to other programs of the
University, and its future growth."
Bill Bryan, a student committee
member said he thought student
representation should be increas-
ed "because students are able to
look at a problem and ask ques-
tions without the vested inter-
ests that the faculty might have."
If the committee forms subcom-
mittees, students could not be pro-
perly represented by only t h r e e
members, explained another stu-
dent member, Frank Cajka.
A faculty member of the com-
mittee, Prof. John E. Bardach,
said he voted for an increase in
student representation because
the work of the committee con-
cerns both students and faculty.
Barfn d h id hP thmirf ht th

Showbiz'a
roac
A CPA
mnall f th

?Ad

iz?

4h

can be
em.
You don't have to play Hamlet to be in
show business. Or write hot copy to
be in the ad business. Or'design moon
rockets to be in aerospace.
The CPA has become a key man
in virtually every type of enterprise.
Why? Because financial and busi-
ness affairs require keen minds to
come up with new concepts in fact-
gathering, problem-solving and com-
municating economic information.
So if problems intrigue you, and
if you have an aptitude for imagina-
tive, concentrated thinking, you might
make a good CPA.
You might work in a public ac-
counting firm, in industry, education
or government. Or you may even de-
cide to open a firm of your own.
What other profession offers so
many diverse opportunities?
Talk with yourfaculty adviser. He
r'n tPIl ni i hniit the ,ninzIric vnir i

I

I

Does it really work?

If you've ever resorted to NoDoz" at 4 a.m.
the night before an exam, you've probably
been disappointed.
NoDoz, after all, is no substitute for
sleep. Neither is anything else we can
think of. .
What NoDoz is is a very strong stim-
ulant. In fact, NoDoz has the strongest
stimulant you can buy without a prescrip-
tion.
Caffeine.
What's so strong about that?
If we may cite The Pharmacological
Basis of Therapeutics: Caffeine is a
powerful central nervous stimulant. Caf-
feine excites all portions of the central
nervous system. Caffeine stimulates all
portions of the cortex, but its main action
is on the psychic and sensory functions.
It produces a more rapid and clearer flow
of thniicyht anti allave rrnwinPCa onri

NoDoz when you can get caffeine in a
cup of coffee?
Very simple. You take NoDoz all at
once instead of sipping coffee for 10 min-
utes. And if you take two NoDoz tablets,
the recommended dosage, you get twice
the caffeine in a cup of coffee.
Two tablets-isn't that likely to be
habit forming? Definitely not. NoDoz is
completely non-habit forming.
Which means it's safe to take
whether you're cramming at night. Or
about to walk into an 8 o'clock class. Or
driving somewhere (even though you're
rested) and the monotony of the road
makes you drowsy.
One last thing you should know
about NoDoz. It now comes in two forms.
Those familiar white pills you take with
water. And a chewable tablet called

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