100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"It's the best
picture about
young people
I have seen!"
-Iai,,,lock*,, ABC-TV
Emanue LWol presents
AN ALLIED ARTISTS FILM
A Frank Perry-Alsid Production
REUI SdS AC O*w*NKtL B. PARN6. WT HD'JGXt.
Tonight
at
7-9 P.M.
CAMPUS
DIAL 8-6416

3o
gr
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
, Sd dy Dennis
Dy
Mihael Buns COLOR c"
WKNR presents
SIMONand GARFUNKEL
FRI., OCT. 31-8:30 P.M.
COBO ARENA
Tickets:
$6.50, $5.50, $4.50, $3 50
Tickets available at COBO Box
Office and all J.L. Hudson
stores. MAIL ORDERS: send
check or monev order with self-
addressed, stamped envelope to
COBO ARENA Box Office, De-
troit, Michiqan 48226.
Produced in association with
AUDIO ARTS

a j*
secona jirotit ljoange

( ;14 P

Sfiin

3ai

NEWS PHONE: 764-0352
BUSINESS PhONE: 764-0534

Friday, October 10, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
news today
>y T be Associatc dPress ad wCollege Press Se)rice
HENRY CABOT LODGE, chief U.S. negotiator in the Viet-
nam peace talks, has been asked to return from Paris next week
for "consultations and instructions."
The announcement, which came yesterday, also said Nixon would
meet tomorrow with Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, Gen. Earle
Wheeler, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other service
chiefs as he embarks on a new round of Vietnam policy consultations.
AMERICAN DEATHS IN VIETNAM DROPPED last week to
the lowest toll in three years.
Official sources said yesterday if the downward trend continues,'
President Nixon might be prompted to speed up troop withdrawals.
Lack of enemy activity was given as the reason for a recent pull-
out from the Shau Valley, seized last spring after a controversial battle
for Hamburger Hill.
However, U.S. officials have declined to speculate whether the
increasing lull foreshadows a political breakthrough toward ending
the war.
CZECHOSLOVAKIA YESTERDAY barred its citizens from
private travel to the West in the most stringent frontier control
since the 1968 Soviet invasion.
Relatively free travel had been allowed even before the ouster of
Stalinist Antonin Novotny as president in 1968, and had been one
of the last freedoms remaining since the invasion.
Airline and travel officials were informed all exit permits in
private passports have been declared invalid immediately.
The cutoff went into effect at midnight Wednesday and caught
hundreds of travelers at airports and frontier crossings.
THE SUPREME COURT yesterday agreed to decide whether
public school in Mississippi-and possibly throughout the south-
must be integrated immediately.
The court will rule on an appeal by the NAACP Legal Defense and
Educational Fund that demands the immediate desegregation of 222
schools in 33 Mississippi districts.
The Justice Department advised the court to reject the appeal
or postpone action, however, the court granted a hearing for Oc-
tober 23.
A BLACK JUDGE yesterday dismissed curfew violation
charges brought against nearly 204 blacks arrested during the
past four days of Las Vegas disorders.
Municipal Court Judge Robert'E. Mullen said he had been assured
his action would end the violence. He added his action would apply
both to those who had pleaded guilty to the charge and those awaiting
arraignment for trial.
The curfew, lasting from dusk until dawn, was in effect Mondaya
and Tuesday night during the worst of the unrest which broke out1
Sunday on the city's predominantly black west side. The curfew
applied only to that area.
* * *
A JETLINER WAS HIJACKED TO (UBA yesterday, the
Federal Aviation Administration reported.
The National Airlines plane bound from Los Angeles to
Miami was over Texas when the pilot notified authorities he was,
being diverted to Havana.
There was no immediate word on how many people were aboard.
The plane was the thirty-first U.S. airliner of a total of 46 that
have been forced to Cuba this year.

Senate J
approves

uliciary

group

Haynsworth

I

TONITE
Again Presents
BILL
VANAVER

1421 H ill St.

Plainclothesmen wrestle with fernale protester

2000 National Guard members
activated in Chiic, ago disruption

ELECTRA RECORDING ARTIST
Banjo, Guitar, Tamboura
"HE'S WHERE IT'S AT IN FOLK MUSIC."--Michael Coonev
SAT. AFT.-1:30-3:30--Workshop
SAT. NITE-After Hours-50c-1 a.m. on
SUNDAY, 5 P M.--Experimental Worship
MONDAY MOVIES--"Macao" and "All That Heaven Allows"
MA RCH AGAINST DEATH
-A VIETNAM MEMORIAL

CHICAGO (J11 )- Gov. Richard
B. Ogilvie yesterday ordered 2,000,
members of the National Guard
to active duty in Chicago after
street battles the night before
between police and some 300
young radicals.
Ogilvie said in Springfield that
Brig. Gen. Richard T. Dunn, who
has been in Chicago for two days,
recommended the Army-affiliated
guard be activated as a result of
the fighting that took place on the
near north side.
The governor said he talked with
Mayor Richard J. Daley about!

the plans of the radicals Tuesday
and Gen. Dunn was asked to ob-
serve the situation.
A spokesman for Ogilvie said
Dunn's recommendation was bas-,
ed on the violence Wednesday,
night and the fear that more dis-
orders might occur last night.
Daley praised police for their
restraint during Wednesday's hit-
and-run skirmishes with young
persons who stormed out of Lin-
coln Park following a bonfire and
rally.
One SDS group, the Weather-
man, sponsored the Lincoln Park

NOVEMBER 14-15

WASHINGTON, D.C.

A maior feature of the November action in Washinqton will be
the MARCH AGAINST DEATH--a single file solemn procession
of 43,000 persons carrving the individual names of the American
Servicemen who have died in the Vietnam War. The March, which
will begin at midnight Nov. 13 and end at 10:00 am. Nov. 15,
will leave Arlington Cemetery, proceed past the White House.
and end at the steps of the Capitol. The March will close with a
Memorial service and the participants can then take part in the
Mass March scheduled for 11:00 a.m. The Michigan delegation
will take part in the March late Friday afternoon.
BUSES: leave Ann Arbor, November 13 at 10:00 pm.
leave Washinqton, November 15 at 10:00 p.m.
COST: $22.00 round trip. Tell us if you want free housing.

NEWBERRY V. THE TOWEL
Getting wrapped up in the issue

For further information call:
For Bus Information

Lundsford Phillips
Anne Friedrichs
Interfaith Council
Fred Green

761-9122
665-0486
663-1870
769-7038

By NADINE COIIODAS
Fashion Consultant
Would you wear a towel to
class ?'
This burning question plagued
the women of Helen Newberry
Wednesday night after Leslie
Siegal, '73. wore a turkish towel
as a skirt to dinner.
She was subsequently charged
with violating Helen Newberry
dress regulations which stipu-
late that one must be attired in
"school dress (skirt)" for din-
ner.
Kathy McGuire, dorm presi-
dent and prosecuting attorney,

ANN ARBOR MARCH AGAINST DEATH COMMITTEE
TICKET SALE BEGINS OCTOBER 15
11:00 to 1:00--Diagi
Afternoon---Fishbowl and workshop
Evening-at the Rally

charged that turkish towels,
though they may fit Webster's
definition of a skirt, are n o t
normal school dress.
After a 45-minute p u b I i c
trial. a four-man jury ruled
Miss Siegal was not guilty of
violating the rules, apparently
deciding that turkish towels are
school clothes.
Trial proceedings were delay-
ed nearly 15 minutes because
Miss Siegal contended that one
of the jurors was biased. The
juror in question was the head
waitress who had warned Miss
Siegal before dinner that she was
H in violation of the rules.
The juror was replaced.
Nearly 50 people jammed the
Helen Newberry sun-porch for
the trial and the presiding
judge had to quiet the rambunc-
tious crowd at least five times.
The opening remarks for the
prosecution included an ex-
planation of existing dorm rules
and the presentation as evidence
of two fashion magazines to es-
tablish what school dress is.
"Leslie came to dinner in a
green t-shirt, a pink towel, and
blue floppy hat," Miss McGuire

charged. "I believe this is not
in accord with 'school dress.'"
"Boo," said many of the aud-
ience.
Defending Miss Siegal w a s
four-man legal team from the
literary college - Paul Bader,
'71. Howard Fruman, '7-, Joel
Seyber, '71 and Mary Ann Dres-
ner. '73. Opening the defense,
Bader said a verdict against
Miss Siegal "might eliminate in-
novation for mankind."
"That's denying Leslie's right
to be a trend setter," he added
with a bright red towel draped
over his shoulder "for effect."
Miss Dresner, taking over Miss
Siegal's defense, maintained
that a towel "is probably longer
and thicker than many of the
skirts worn. It's a wrap skirt
only instead of being made out
of wool or cotton it's made out
of terry cloth."
''Hurrah," yelled a majority
of those present.
After the trial, Miss Siegal
said. "I think the dress code is
completely ridiculous. I believe
the dorm has no right to tell me
ivhat to wear."

rally for 400 persons which end-
ed in two hours of street skirm-
ishes between police and c 1u b-
carrying, helmeted youths. There
were 65 persons arrested and 34I
.persons, including 21 policemen,
injured.
The Weatherman's rival for con-
trol of SDS and recruitment of
many unaligned young radicaTs,1
is Revolutionary Youth M o v e -
ment II which sponsored a demon-
stration yesterday at the U. S.
courthouse where eight political'
activists - the Chicago Eight -
are being tried on charges ofa
crossing state lines in a conspir-
acy to incite riots.
About 150 persons were in the
courthouse plaza but there were
no incidents.
Twelve women including B e r -
nardine Dohrn, 27, former inter-
organizational secretary of SDS,
were arrested yesterday after they
rushed police during a demonstra-
tion near the Conrod Hilton hotel.
Police said women marched six
abreast at Balboa Drive and
Michigan Avenue and refused
police orders to disperse. Offic-
ials said the women, many of
whom wore helmets and carried
clubs and chains, planned to
march to an induction center.
Those arrested were charged
with aggravated battery, m o b
action and resisting arrest. The
others were permitted to continue
the march. Seven policement were
slightly injured.
Leaders of both SDS wings pre-'
dicted 5,000 to 15,000 young per-
sons would attend the demon-
strations planned through tomor-
row in Chicago.
Daley said at a news conference
that Wednesday night's window-
smashing "guerrilla tactics" were
"an outrage against the com-
munity."
He said he would not hesitate
to request National Guard troops
to help quell rioting if necessary,!
but he has no plans to do so at
present.

10-7 ballot
follows week
of delay
WASHINGTON 11) The Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee ap-
proved the Supreme Court
nomination of Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr. yesterday, op-
ening the way for a spirited
struggle on the floor.
The vote was 10-6 to climax a
two-hour closed debate o v e r
Haynsworth's business dealings.
Maryland Republican Charles
Mac Mathias withheld his vote on
grounds information he asked for
was not immediately available.
Some hours later, however, Ma-.
thias in a letter to the committee
Chairman asked to be recorded in
r opposition to the nomination,
making the final vote 10-7.
Before the committee took its
vote on the nomination, it reject-
ed, 14-3, a motion by Mathias to
postpone action again.-
The committee postponed its
vote twice before, last week and
again Wednesday after Sen. Rob-
ert P. Griffin, the Republican
whip from Michigan, publicly
joined the opposition to Hayns-
worth.
Judiciary Chairman James o.
Eastland (D-Miss.), said it would
be at least a week before minority
and majority reports could be pre-
pared, a formality necessary be-
fore floor debate can start.
Sen. Birch Bayh, the Indiana
Democrat and Judiciary Commit-
tee member who has been leading
the opposition to Haynsworth, said
it may be two weeks before debate
begins.
Despite the solid vote to report
the nomination of Haynsworth, a
judge on the 4th Court of Appeals
for the past 12 years, prospects
for confirmation remained highly
uncertain with each side claiming
the majority required to confirm
or reject the nominee.
Bayh, in a news conference out-
side the committee room, several
times referred to "half the Sen-
ate" being against the nomination.
Eastland, who has conceded that
there might be 30 to 35 votes
against confirmation, said yester-
day, "He'll be confirmed by a sub-
stantial vote."
Estimates reportedly compiled
by the Democratic leadership
ranged from what was described
as a "rock bottom" 52 votes
against the nomination to a high
of 63.
The 63 figure was said to in-
clude every member of the Senate
who wants to vote against Hayns-
worth, but might for one reason
or another be obliged to go the
other way.
President Nixon has in a d e it
clear to his Republican colleagues
that he expects their support on
the nomination.
As an example of the uncer-
tainty, one Republican senator
who was considered solidly behind
the administration told a reporter
privately yesterday that not only
would he vote against it on the
floor, but might speak out before
then.
This same senator said also that
another Republican whose vote is
considered influential now is
ready to join the opposition.
Bayh in a "bill of particulars"
has listed seven instances in which
he said Haynsworth took part in
a decision while holding an inter-
est in one of the companies in-
volved in the case.
SNATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATMN
FOX EAT TEATRESX
FOX ILLa6E
375 No. MAPLE PD.-7691300
MON. -FRI.-7:20-9:30

-SAT. and SUN.--i:00-3:05-
5:10-7:20-9:30-

OCTOBER 24-26

>
;A>
y py'p
M''. y
3x ..

BRIAN BEDFORD

School clothes?

TAMMY GRIMES

GYiiKIKANA
SUNDAY
REGISTRATION OPENS 10 A.M.
SCCAA memb rs-3
Non-member--4
AA Pioneer High Parking Lot
Sponsor: Sports Car Club of AA Info-665-6074

SPAGHETTI
DINNER
TIME
Is Sunday, October 12, at SDT sorority
1405 Hill St. from 5:00-8:00 P.M.
PRICE: $1.25 ALL ARE INVITED
BRING YOUR FRIENDS!--

NOEL COWARD'S

PESNTNDT ADMI 8

w

BLUES!

BLUES!

BLUES!

BLUES!

TODAY!

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
FIRST IN '69
D1lI If DI I Ic 'D A I#

I

1

I

m

l

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan