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October 09, 1969 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-09

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Page Fight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 9, 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 9, 1969

I

LSA PROT ESTERS:
GA denies right of
faculty to discipline

Sinclair indicted for bombing

(M)

By LAURIE HARRIS
Graduate Assembly passed a
resolution last night stating that
the faculty has no jurisdiction
over students arrested in the LSA
Bldg. sit-in Sept. 25.
Chicao-6'
- _
police,
D5 clash
CHICAGO GP - Young persons
marched through the Near North
Side last night, smashing five
store windows. battering two squad
cars and clashing briefly with
police.
At least 15 persons were arrest-
ed on the first night of an an-
nounced four-day Students for a
Democratic Society national ac-
tion.
Most of the arrests came after
a cordon of 60 police blocked off
a column of marchers at Clark
and Division Streets. The demon-
strators pounded on two police
cars with bricks, smashing wind-
shields as a crowd of perhaps 1,000
persons gathered.
As police moved in to arrest
some of the protesters, the others
faded into the crowd or dashed
into side streets.
They had announced their des-
tination as a nearby hotel.
Another column of protesters
was halted by police west of Lin-
coln Park in the Old Town dis-
trict. Four men and a woman were
placed in a police van after a brief
scuffle.
Earlier. the radicals had massed
in Lincoln Park for a "revolu-
tionary heroes night." Capt. Rob-
ert J. Lynskey, commander of po-
lice units in the area, estimated
the crowd at 500.
The park was a focus of vio-
lence the week of the Democratic
National Convention.
The national action has been
called by the militant "Weather-
man" faction of the SDS. The less
militant RYM II faction, as well
as the Black Panther Party and
other leftist groups, said earlier
they disassociated themselves from
the action.
Chitcago '
berne fit
A benefit for the Chicago Eight
conspiracy will be held at 8 p.m.
tomorrow at Bursley Hall
The benefit will be a "mixed
media bash," featuring local
hard-rock bands. The Stooges, The
Up, Tarantula and, The Solar
Wind will play for the benefit.
Also scheduled for the program
are poetry readings, a light show,
newsreels and movies.
The $1.50 admission fee will go
toward the defense of the eight
"conspirators" now on trial in
Chicago for their actions in that
city last year during the Demo-
cratic convention.
Correction
The Fifth Dimension
Concert will be
at 8:30

Michael Brown, treasurer, saidj
that students who are prosecuted
by both the city and thejUniver-
sity will be in double jeopardy.
He suggested they press CSJ not'
to handle discipline cases arising
from the sit-in for this reason. 1
Frank Perlmutter, from Political
Science, said calling the sit-in a
non-academic act w o u 1 d be
asserting President Robben Flem-
ing's right to call in the police.
He said he preferred to have the
"entire business dropped by every-
one" both civil and University
authority.
Brown added, "Fleming washed
his hands of the situation by call-
ing in the police."
Also last night GA urged the
Regents to "consider and adopt"
the revisions of section 7 of their
bylaws as endorsed by SGC and
the Senate Assembly.
Section 7 deals with student
decision-making power and the
proposed Office of Student Serv-
ices (now student affairs). It also
recognizes SGC as the campus-
wide student governing body and
Central Student Judiciary as the
overall judicial body.
Perlmutter told the Assembly
that passage of the bylaws could
settle questions of discipline and
jurisdiction which have arisen
from the LSA Bldg. sit-in.
The assembly also established a
committee on Graduate affairs to
inquire into the workings of in-
dividual departments. The com-
mittee will also investigate tenure
and grievance procedures as they
are conducted in the individual
departments.
Charge racis m
in Lawy School,
The Black Law Students As-
sociation (BLSA) "hearing to show
cause" that the Law School is a
racist institution will be held to-
night at 8 p.m. in the Union Ball-
room.
"Members of the black com-
munity of Washtenaw County and
the University will be represented,
and the hearing will be held
whether the faculty comes or not,"
BLSA spokesman Theodore Spear-
man said last night.
The BLSA has distributed a
factsheet contending the Univer-
sity is not meeting the needs for
black lawyers in the area, and it
intends to prove its case of the
failings of the Law School tonight.
The Federation of Associations
of Schools of the Health Profes-
sions, a newly created organiza-
tion, has named University public
health Dean Myron E. Wegman
as its presiding officer.
The federation began taking'
shape late last year when a group
of associations of health schools
had representatives review com-
mon objectives a n d possibilities
for cooperation in meeting t h e!
nation's health manpower re-
quirements.

(Con tinued fromPage 1
The indictment lists five alleged
"overt acts" on which the con-
spiracy count is based:
-On Sept. 7, 1968, Sinclair met
with Valler at the First Unitarian
Church in Detroit.
--Valler met with Plamondon in
the Detroit offices of the under-
ground newspaper the "Fifth Es-
tate" on Sept, 14.
-Forrest and Valler supplied

"a quantity of dynamite" to Pla-
mondon on Sept. 24.
-Plamondon placed the bomb
at the CIA office Sept. 29.
--Valler and Plamondon met
seven days later at the Panther'
headquarters on Hill St.
Genie Plamondon, the defend-
ant's wife, indicated last night,
the Panthers will issue a state-
ment today.
The indictment came on the
same day the FBI reported they

LSA Assembly to propose
new faculty-student council

were launching an investigation
into bombings, arson and vandal-
ism that have hit draft board of-
fices and other federal instal-
lations across the country.
The bombing of the CIA office,
causing $6,000 damage, occurred
after six similar incidents in the
Detroit area. At that time, the
FBI was first brought into the
case, and Ann Arbor Police Chief
Walter Krasny noted that all seven
bombings had the same method
of operation.
Since then, two more bombings
have occurred in the campus area.
A University engineering labora-
tory, the North Campus' Institute
for Science and Technology, con-
ducting classified government re-
search was bombed in October,
1968, and last June another blast
blew an ROTC staff car to pieces
at North Hall.
Valler, who "used to hang
around" the Panthers in Detroit,
according to Argus Editor Kelley,
was arrested on charges of mari-
juana sale and possession shortly
before the CIA bombing. He was
charged with selling 14 pounds of
marijuana to an undercover agent,
and was later sent to Jackson for
a 7-10 year sentence after plead-
ing guilty to the lesser charge of
possession.
Valler was eventually cleared
from involvement in the Detroit
area bombings last year.

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fcontinued fromli Page 1
"Our whole purpose is to create
an operation forum, so when prob-
lems come up we will have a
standing organization to air them,"
says Ken Lasser, chairman of the
Assembly.
"What we're going to do is ask
Hays to help organize a committee
to work toward implementation of
the report," says Bob Grobe, an-$
other committee member.
"We're not trying to ram any-
thing down anyone's throat, and
yet the meeting with the dean is
only a first step. We hope to pre-'

sent a final draft of the proposal
to the governing faculty as soon
as possible," Grobe says.
Hays is not optimistic about
the prospects for implementation'
of the committee's proposal, how-
ever. "The executive committee of
the college has already entertained
the idea of a student-faculty as-
sembly, but there is really nothing
under consideration now," says
Hays.
"We had a faculty meeting last
week, and couldn't even get any-
where with the idea of all-faculty
assembly," he said.

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