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October 09, 1969 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-09

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 9, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TENANTS UNION
Work with the Rent Strike-
Meeting Tonight, first floor, S.A.B., 8:00 P.M.
for potential
"TYPiISTS
* KEY PUNCHERS
" RESEARCHERS
" ORGANIZERS
o LEGAL ASSISTANTS

" 0l

/ M 'A

hg
By ERIC SIEGEL
Two days ago, I was a shadow.
I was a shadow because I
wanted to find out what a Mich-
igan football player does to
prepare for the Monday through
Friday ritual of football prac-
tice.
In order to make my dis-
covery, I chose one player and
followed him step by step for
the three hours before one of
the Wolverines' hardest prac-
tice days.
The player was Rich Cal-
darazzo, a 5-11, 222 pound senior
guard from Melrose Park, Illi-
nois. The day was Tuesday, Oc-
tober 7. Here is what I found.
Caldarazzo left the team din-
ing table at South Quad about
12:55 and was down in t h e
training room in Yost Field
House a few minutes later.
The room was not very large.
It was just about large enough
to accommodate tha dozen and
a half trainer's tables that lin-
ed two of its walls, an ice ma-
chine, a whirlpool machine, a
couple of leg exercise machines,
a couple of small tables, two
large stacks of freshly-laund-
ered towels. and, of course, a
couple of dozen of the men who
Y~ 1

5:

T'he

came to be taped, iced, heated,
etc. and a few of the men who
would work on them.
* * *
CALDARAZZO STRIPPED to
the waist and picked up an ice
pack from a freezer near the
center of the room before stret-
ching out on one of the tables.
"Hey Johnny, could you put
a hot pack on my back?" he
yelled across in the general
direction of one of the trainers.
Two tables down from Cald-
arazzo, Phil Seymour, who h a d
his leg in a 'cast for five weeks
and just started working out in
uniform the day before, was
working on a knee exercycle.
"How'd it feel out there yes-
terday, Phil?"
"Not too bad, but I had a little
trouble cutting."
Gradually, a few more players
drifted in, and some of t h e
trainers started carting in rolls
of tape and packages of a c e
bandages.
Someone disappeared for a
while and brought out a 1954
copy of Sports Illustrated, in
which a writer had done a fea-
ture on a Michigan football
player and called it "44."

I

tong
"Listen to this Rich," some-
one said, "it says here he want-
ed to do an article on someone
who went out every day and did
their job without getting any
headlines. A typical f o o t b a 11
player."
"Yeah, that's me," Caldarazzo
laughed, "I'm typical."
"Yeah, but the only differ-
ence is the guy from Sports Il-
lustrated wrote about a football
player," someone joked.
AT ABOUT 1:15 Caldarazzo
took the pack off his back and
got a sock from his locker. When
he returned to the training
room Henry Hill was there, sit-
ting on a table.
Hill: "How did he pick you to
follow around?"
Caldarazzo: "I guess on looks
and personality."
Hill: "He made a helluva
mistake."
Trainer: "Those reporters
must drink like hell."
Caldarazzo then went over to
a corner of the training r o o m
to paint his ankle with Tough
Skin, a highly viscous lIi q u i d
solution that keeps the tape
from sticking to your skin. He
then stood up on a chair while

road
head trainer Lindsay McLean
taped his ankles.
* * *
IT WAS 1:30 and Caldarazzo
walked into the adjoining lock-
er room to get dressed in street
clothes. "Bo'll probably work
us harder this week," he said.
"Everybody's sort of down after
we lost to Missouri.
"Sometimes when you're win-
ning," Caldarazzo continued,
"you have a tendency to slack
off a little. I think Bo may
think that's what happened to
us last week, so he's going to
make sure we all get back on
the winning track for Purdue."
Caldarazzo put on his cleats
and a white tee shirt with num-
ber 56 stenciled on the sleeve
and started walking over to the
Athletic Administration Build-
ing to watch the game films of
Purdue.
"WE LOOK at films e v e r y
day," Caldarazzo told me as he
entered a small room with sev-
eral chairs scattered around the
floor, and two long wooden tab-
les at one end and a large
blackboard at the other.
He ran upstairs to the coach-
es office and returned a couple
of minutes later with two rolls
of films. "I'll look at the Pur-
due-TCU films today. I haven't
seen those yet."
A few seconds later Caldar-
azzo had the film wound around
the projector and was starting
to flash it on one of the room's
white walls.
"One big advantage to a 11
this, joked Caldarazzo, "is
that even if you don't make it
as a pro you can always run
a movie projector."
A small hand device made the
film backtrack at the touch of
Caldarazzo's thumb.
"YOU HAVE to watch the
guy who's going to be playing
over you," Caldarazzo said, flick-
ing the button to repeat a play.
The guy playing over Caldarazzo
this week will be Alex Davis,
the Boilermaker's 6-7, 270-
pound behemoth.
"When they're that big," Cal-
darazzo stated, "you have to
start finding out where the
weakness is. You have to watch
his style, his pass rush.
"The films are valuable, but
you don't really find out what
he plays like until the first
series of downs."
At about 2 o'clock, the Wol-
verines' interior line coach Larry
Smith came into the room and
Declined-

to

practice

r

-Daily-Jay Cassidy
Caldarazzop ss blocking

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Daily Libels to fall to VA* Muggers
Famous Football Game
WHERE
MUGGERS Destroy Libels
AND
Retire The Brown Wastepaper Basket Forever
FRIDAY, OCT. 10, 5:00-Wines Field
ThFMNan-Gn-CampUs HO/ciAKEn
OF NEW HAVEN / SHIRTMAKERS

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began pointing out a few things
about the film to his starting
right guard.
"Davis is a big, strong son of
a gun," Smith said, "but I think
you can block him. You just
gotta go in there and hit him
hard, Caldo."
THE REST of the offensive
line came in in the next ten
minutes and sat down while
Coach Smith took over the con-
trols and began talking about
Purdue's defense.
"Their defense will give and
you can score on them, but they
tighten up when they have to.
The question is can you score on
them when you need the points."
Caldarazzo sat hunched for-
ward, elbows on one of the long
tables in front of him, feet tap-
ping the floor, eyes steady on
the scree nahead of him, trying,
as he would say later, "to keep
everything straight in my head."
At 2:25, Smith shut off the
projector and went to the blacK-
board. A list of plays were
chalked in a column on one side
of the blackboard, and Smith
diagrammed each one in suc-
cession, making sure each of his
players understood the play.
"OKAY, Reggie? Got it Pete?
All right, Caldo? Smith asked
the questions quickly, and the
responses came back, quickly,
too, as if someone had studied
their multiplication tables well
the night before.
By three o'clock the meeting

Dick Caldarazzo

Al T'1O IN ITIA
FOR EVERYONE

ofthe guards and centers was
over, and Caldarazzo began
walking back to Yost Field
House. "From now until prac-
tict starts it's just a slow pro-
cess of getting dressed," was the
way he described it.
Most of the players were in
Yost by now, milling about the
locker and training rooms in
various states of undress.
CALDARAZZO went over and
talked to fullback Garvie Craw,
his roommate last year, who was
getting taped in the training
room. During the next 20 min-
utes, Caldarazzo managed to
greet most of the players, talk
casually with a few of them, and
put on several pairs of socks,
shoulder pads, hip pads, pants
with thigh pads, cleats and num-
ber 56 jersey.
It was half past three, and
Caldarazzo went back to the
training room to have his elbows
taped and bandaged. He then
picked up his mouth guard and
started walking towards the
Stadium with Craw and Bob
Baumgartner.
"I was talking to an ex-foot-
ball player the other day,"
Caldarazzo laughed. "He was
telling me about his Saturday
afternoons.
"HE SAID he never believed
that people cut the grass and
painted things on Saturday af-
ternoon. He always thought the
world stopped between one and
four o'clock."
For Caldarazo and the Wol-
verines, however, it was almost
four o'clock on a Tuesday after-
noon, and their day was really
just starting. The rest had
merely been preliminary. "Work
day" was just beginning.
IN THE OCTOBER
i The Fight For the President's
Mind - And the Men Who
Won It by Townsend Hoopes
. The Oakland Seven by Elinor
Langer
* The Young and the Old:
Notes on a New History by
Robert Jay Lifton
..and, Dan Wakefield on
The Great Haircut War

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