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October 09, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IF YOU DO FEEL THAT
THE WAR SHOULD STOP
NOW:
THEN DO SOMETHING
ABOUT IT
CONTACT:
New Mobilization Committee

seco id f routdpag~e.

P

41M friogiCan

43ai1l

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PhONE: 764-0554

Thursday, October 9, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

--ti

the
news
by The Associated Press

today
andu Clle( e Press Service

I

2522 SAB

769-2570

Do Your Own Thing
FOR YOUR
MICHIGANENSIAN
SENIOR PICTURES
SIGN UP IN THE DIAG (Fishbowl-If Rain)

SENATE-HOUSE CONFEREES agreed on a compromise bill
to support the student guaranteed loan program.
The bill's key feature increases government subsidy payments to
banks from the present ceiling of 7 per cent to 10 per cent. The num-
ber of loans granted has dropped since the prime interest rate rose to
8 " per cent.
Agreement between the two houses came after a compromise on
an amendment offered by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) re-
quiring banks not to force students or their parents to do business at
the bank to receive a loan.
TWO RESOLUTIONS seeking U.S. withdrawal from South
Vietnam were introduced in the Senate.
Sen. Harold Hughes (D-Iowa) introduced a resolution that would
end U.S. aid to South Vietnam "with all reasonable haste" unless Sai-
gon ends censorship, releases political prisoners, and prepares to yield
power to a provisional government.
The other proposal, submitted by Sen. Frank Church (D-Idaho),
urges American withdrawal after a "reasonable interval" to guard the
safety of U.S. troops and South Vietnamese who might want to leave
with them.

10-4

MONDAY-FRIDAY

LAWYERS for Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) asked the
Massachusetts Supreme Court to clarify inquest procedures.
,a*Edward B. Hanify, Kennedy's attorney, said -the senator does not
want to block an inquest into the death of Mary Jo Kopechne but
wants his constitutional rights protected'if one is held.
ACADEMY Questioning the constitutionality of the state's inquest law, Han-
ify asked the State Supreme Court to allow Kennedy to have counsel
A A Dthere with the right to cross-examine other witnesses. He also asked
..SMwthat the inquest be closed to the public. -

Haynsworth
Conlin bn
extra-trial
statements
By IRA HOFFMAN
County Circuit Judge John
W. Conlin yesterday ordered
all persons involved in the!
John Collins murder trial to y
refrain from making any ex
tra-judicial statements.
Conlin explained that the reason
for the issuance of the "ex-parteI
order" was to prevent any pre- w
judice in the trial of Collins, ac-
cused murderer of Eastern Michi-
gan University coed Karen Beine-
man.
According to Michael Devine, a.
court spokesman, the order is
directed at "police officials, the
defense attorneys, the prosecution
and their staffs, any investigators,
and all court personnel."
In other developments at yes-
terday's pre-trial hearing, Conlin
delayed judgment on two key de-!
fense motions until an additional Sen. Kennedy discus
hearing scheduled for Tuesday. --- --
The first motion asks the court 'CHICAGO 8' TRI
to quash Collins' trial on the
grounds that Collins was arrested
illegally. The defense lawyers ; W
have charged that police arrested
Collins "solely for the purpose
Df obtaining fingerprints."
Conlin also delayed judgment i
on a defense judgment on a de- meC]
fense motion to suppress certain
evidence that has been introduced
by the prosecution. CHICAGO (R')-A key govern
ment witness testified yesterda
The defense claims the evidence that he heard two of the eigh
was obtained through the use men charged with inciting violen
of faulty search warrants. during Democratic Conventio
Meanwhile, there have been un- week in 1968, urge crowds t
confirmed reports that the de- fight police in the streets.
fense may ask for a change of Robert Pierson, a Chicago po
venue for the trial. Defense at- liceman, told a U.S. District Cour
torney Robert Francis yesterday jury of 10 women and 2 men th
declined to comment on the pos- he posed as a motorcycle gan
sibility. member and became a bodyguan

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"Natasha and Pierre-The Burning of Moscow"

nomination
question'

WEEKDAYS-2:00-8:00
SAT. and SUN.-1 :00, 4:30, 8:00

10 F 'FTH FyOrUM

IN MONTREAL striking firemen and policemen returned to
work as the army continued to guard key installations around the
city.
Both departments were reported operating normally after a night
of near chaos Tuesday in Canada's largest city. Two people were kill-
ed in the rioting and scores were hurt as mobs looted the St. Cath-
erine St. shopping district.
Elements of four rifle companies flown in Tuesday night remain-
ed on guard around police headquarters, municipal buildings, and
broadcasting facilities.
MAYNARD JACKSON, a black attorney, was elected vice
mayor of Atlanta, Ga. Tuesday, by more than 18,000 votes.
Jackson is the first black to hold Atlanta's second highest politi-
cal office. Unofficial returns showed him defeating a veteran city
alderman 54,455 to 36,229.
Last year Jackson, a political newcomer, challenged U.S. Sen.
Herman Talmadge and lost.
THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES voted to nearly triple
President Nixon's request for federal water pollution control funds.
The bill, which now goes to the Senate, increased the $214 mil-
lion requested by the Nixon administration to $600 million. An effort
to raise the amount to $1 billion was narrowly defeated 148-146.
The clean water program provides federal grants to states and
local communities to help build waste treatment plants.

-Associated Press
ses the Haynsworth case
IA L:
~ays Rubin
111 ag o riot

Griffin joins
opposition.
WASHINGTON (91 - Senate
Republican whip Robert P.
Griffin openly joined the op-
position to Judge Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr. y e s t e r d ay,
dealing a severe - and pos-
sibly fatal - blow to Hayns-
worth's Supreme -Court nomi-
nation.
The White House s a i d, how-
ever, that President Nixon's sup-
port of Haynsworth does not rest
on any Senate head count but on
the President's faith in the judge's
integrity and background.
Ronald L. Ziegler, press secre-
tary, said Nixon still believes the
nomination will move out of the
Senate Judiciary Committee and
will be confirmed on the floor.
In the Senate, Griffin's decla-
ration sent shock waves along
both sides of the aisle and led to
Judiciary Committee postpone-
ment for 24 hours - until 10:30
a.m. today - of any action in the
case.
"It is our hope that the matter
will be faced up to and disposed
- of one way or another," said Ma-
jority Leader Mike Mansfield.
The Montana Democrat said he
had sent telegrams to all Demo-
cratic Judiciary Committee mem-
bers urging them to be present
and that Republican Leader Hugh
Scott was doing the same with
GOP members.
Griffin's move prompted at
least one other influential Repub-
lican senator to join the opposi-
tion and caused a Democratic
e' leader to comment that there now
is "serious question" that Hayns-
- worth could be confirmed.
h Maine's Margaret Chase Smith,
n chairman of the Senate Republi-
of can conference, said in a floor
ispeech she opposes Haynsworth on
the basis of his business dealings
n and decisions while a member of
's the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals.
3e She said Republican opposition
Ie to the nomination in the Senate
s- is much greater "than is generally
e- realized."
le Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, the
u assistant Democratic leader, said
there is "serious question" of
erHaynsworth receiving sufficient
a support for confirmation.
he Kennedy declined to say how he
as stands. But he said he still ex-
Ve pects the Judiciary Committee to
ie report the nomination to the floor
er although he said the vote will be
Ve "much closer" t h a n before the
Ps Griffin announcement.
Griffin led the successful fight
an last year to block elevation of Abe
r- Fortas to chief justice a n d he
J. made no secret of his feeling that
y there was little difference between
by conflict of interest charges against
Fortas and Haynsworth.

RUSS GIBB Presents
at
The Grande-Riveria
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10
SRC
AMBOY DUKES
ALICE COOPER
Admission $3.00
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11
THE WHO
ALICE COOPER
THE SKYj
Admission $4.00
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12
THE WHO
ALL THE LONELY PEOPLE
AMBOY DUKES
Admission $4.00
ALSO: World's First Sonavision Laser Beam Light Show
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Call 834-9348 Grande River at Joy in Detroit
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10 F H.orui. UNDERGROUND MOVIES
Friday and Saturday evenings at 11:15 P.M.
not continuous with "War and Peace," separate admission
DIFFERENT PROGRAM EACH WEEK
Felix Greene's
"INSIDE NORTH VIETNAM"
The film provides on authetnic account of life in North Vietnam
under war conditions. Felix Greene did the photoaraphy when he
was sent to North Vietnam for 3 1/ months as a special corres-
pondent for the San Francisco Chronicle and for C.B.S. Television
News. He returned to the United States with 20.000 feet of uncen-
sored film and from this footage INSIDE NORTH VIETNAM was
made.
"INSIDE NORTH VIETNAM is superb cinematography, but it is
more than that. It is an exact mirror of life in North Vietnam today.

n-
ay
ht
ice
on
to
g-
irt
at
ng
rd

DRAFT OFFICES PRIME TARGET
FBI investigates raids on federal buildings:

for Jerry Rubin, a Yippie lead
who is one of the defendants.
Pierson described several con
versations he said he had wit
Rubin in August 1968 in Lincol
Park and in Grant Park, sitesc
clashes between police and ant
war demonstrators.
Pierson testified that Rubi
spoke to a crowd of 1,000 person
Aug. 26, 1968, in Lincoln Park. H
quoted Rubin as saying, "Th
elections are phony. We must di,
rupt the elections. We must b
come fighters and take to th
streets in small groups. See yo
in the streets tonight."
Pierson testified that anothE
defendant, Bobby G. Seale,
Black Panther leader, spoke to t
crowd. Pierson quoted Sealee
saying, "The time for singing, 'W
Shall Overcome,' is past. It's tim
to buy .357 magnums, .45-calib(
pistols, carbines and kill pigs. W
must break up into small grout
and surround the pigs."
Seale stood up in court whe
Pierson mentioned his name eat
her. Seale asked Judge Julius
Hoffman to strike the testimon
because he was not defended
the counsel of his choice.

By The Associated Press
The FBI said yesterday it
has launched an investigation
into bombings, arson and van-
dalism that have hit draft board
offices and other federal instal-
lations across the country.
Hundreds of draft records
have been destroyed during t h e
night-time raids in recent
months and extensive damage
has been done to many of the
buildings.
The latest incident occurred
Tuesday night at New York
City's Armed Forcs Induction
Center in lower Manhattan,
where an explosion shattered
more than 40 windows, damaged
walls and blew out partitions.
The building, which also had
been the target of a bomb blast
in 1968, houses the files of
thousands of draftees but none
of these records were damaged.
Several persons were in t h e

lobby of the building when the
11:25 p.m. blast occurred on
the fifth floor but no one was
hurt.
An explosion at the base of a
tree near an ROTC headquart-
ers on the campus of Texas
A&M University in College Sta-
tion, Tex., shattered 31 win-
dows in four dormitories Tues-
day. Again, no one was hurt.
Three incidents occurred in
the early morning hours of
Sept. 26 -- explosions in the
federal buildings in Milwaukee
and a National Guard armory
in Madison, Wis., and a fire at
a draft board in Akron, Ohio.,
In Milwaukee an explosion in
a stairway near draft offices
did $75,000 damage. At almost
the same time the armory in
Madison suffered $100,000 dam-
age from an explosion at the
entrance to a drill area.
The fire in the Summit Coun-

ty draft board in Akron was at-
tributed by authorities to an
arsonist after two empty clean-
ing fluid cans were found.
Fire officials said the fluid
had been poured on draft board
records dumped from files, with
heavy destruction of the records
and walls of the office.
Six days later, two members of
a group of antiwar demonstrat-
ors picketing the federal build-
ing and a church in Cleveland
said publicly that they "felt re-
sponsible" for the Akron fire,
but no arrests were made.
The FBI and New York au-
thorities are investigating an
explosion that did considerable
damage to the new federal
building in downtown Manhat-
tan on Sept. 19.
The blast damaged Depart-
ment of Commerce offices -
near a Department of Defense

office and a floor above Selec-.
tive Service offices.
Whether the explosion stem-
med from a bomb or accumula-
tion of gas has not been dis-
closed.
At Stroudsburg, Pa., Aug. 16
all A-1 classification cards were
burned, along with a picture of
President Nixon, on the floor
of the offices of a draft board.
The approximately 9,000 f i I e
cards have since been replaced.
Fifteen persons allegedly were
caught dancing around a bon-
fire of draft records in a draft
board on Chicago's Southside
May 25. Police said the group
had smeared the draft records
with paint and tar before burn-
ing them.
Last Saturday, fire destroyed
files and damaged equipment at
the Naval ROTC offices at Co-
lumbia University in New York.

Judge Hoffman ordered a mar-
shal to make Seale sit down, and'
he noted as he has done many
times in relation to words or ac-j
tions by the defendant, "the mat-
ter will be appropriately dealt
with at a later time."
Pierson testified that Rubin3
gave him a diary which Pierson
later turned over to police, then
told Rubin he burned it to prevent

In his statement, Griffin said
"the fact that Judge Haynsworth
is willing now to conduct himself
differently in the future is not a
sufficient answer."
Griffin, who notified the Presi-
dent of his decision Monday, said
he believes Haynsworth to be an
"honest and learned judge."
"But," he added, "legitimate and
substantial doubt has been raised

police from getting it. The con- concerning his sensitivity to the
tents of the diary were not dis- high ethical standards demanded
closed. of the bench."

THE FIFTH
MARTIN LUTHER KING

SATURDA

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8:30 P.M.

Alpha Phi Alpha-

"It is impossible not to be moved by this
film . . . the eloquence of its scenes would
shake even a hardened militant."

BACH CLUB
presents
Harold Haugh
speaking on
"BACH AS PREACHER
AND WORD PAINTER"
Thursday, Oct. 9, 8 P.M.
1 236 Washte now
(at S. Forest near S.U.)
Refreshments and FUN
for further info:
665-6806, 663-2827, 761-7356
ACADEMY
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"

Uk fl U'T*Uk.[

-Boston Herald

Traveler

Felix Greene's

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