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October 07, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-07

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 7, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, October 7, 1 969

"Worth Celebrating"--Detroit News
"Mounts to Marvelous Climax"

-Michigan Daily

f

UNION-LEAGUE

present

-'7PROFESIO'NAL
THEATER
P .RGRAM

Special Perforc
3CIC "".1v3C9

Faculitl
Following is the final report
of the Senate Assembly's Aca-
demic Affairs Committee on
POTC. Space limitations forced
major abridgements of the re-
port. Deletions are marked by
ellipscs.-Eds.)
The Committee was faced
ti t h considerable indif-
ference towards its considerations
of ROTC at Michigan, on the one
hand: and on the other with urg-
igfrom individuals who do feel
a concern about ROTC and the
military, that we expand our in-
!estigation, judging the problem
in terms of national goals and
confronting the moral question in
our deliberations and in this Re-
port
A passionate denunciation of
tie role of the military in Amer-
ican society can be balanced by
an equally passionate argument,
" the abandonment of our mil-
itary forces in today's world is'
morally unrealistic.
The members of the Committee
hav strong feelings about the

r ROTC.
war, about militarism, about t h e
University's responsibility be-
fore the state and the country.
But we are not persuaded that
either to confirm 'or to reject the
ROTC programs on this basis is
to accomplish anything.
It is argued on the other hand
that the University has an over-
riding obligation to serve the
needs of society, military and
otherwise, and that to consider
the abolition of the ROTC pro-
grams represents an irrespon-
sible attack on a vital institution
or even a want of patriotism
The Committee denies that the
patriotism of the University com-
munity can be superficially de-
fined in terms of its acceptance
or rejection of the ROTC units ...
The Committee does believe
that the unaltered retention of
ROTC can be justified only on =
these public rather than on aca-
demic grounds, for the academic
return to the University of the
ROTC programs is slight.
The Committee therefore has

Meet
APA
after

with
Company

of. AA

report
come to the conclusion that its
obligations are:
-to evaluate the ROTC pro-
grais within the University as an
institution, apart from the cur-
rent political climate, and
-to determine whether the
University can best serve the gen-
eral good by abolition of the
programs or by reform which
would make them consonant with
the purposes and standards of the
University.
Our evaluations takes into ac-
count the arguments of those who
favor reform, who point out that
in accepting and supporting the
ROTC programs the University
has undertaken a public service.
The armed forces draw as many
as 80 per cent of their junior
officers from the nation's ROTC
units ---
We also recognize the argu-
ments of those who favor sevey-
ance on academic grounds, con-
tending that the University and
ROTC need not have any formal
relation with each other. They
maintain that, if the Department
of Defense relies so heavily on
the colleges and universities to
produce line officers, not just
reserve officers, it is precisely be-
cause the military has not faced
the problem of an alternative ex-
cept in national crisis.
The protest that there is no
alternative to ROTC is merely a
reflection of the fact that the De-
partment of Defense has never
tried to create one . . .
The University should b? made
aware of the limits of action if
we turn our back and leave t h e
training of officers to others. The
ROTC programs can be removed
from the campus by abrogation of
the contracts on one year's notice.
We will have washed our hands of
them, which some will welcome,
but ROTC as an institution will
continue elsewhere.
The Committee therefore favors

the alternative of reformed ROTC
programs, which might serve as
Mod ,1 for other institutions. It
i well attested that ROTC reform .
has come about in the past pre-
cisely because of pressure upon
the units from their host institu-
tions, not from the Pentagon.
We have now the opportunity
to bring somie rforming pressure
to bear, because neither the sere-
ice academies nor the OCS could
easily and quickly bridge the gap
if the ROTC programs through-
out the count ry wvere . to close.
Our recommendations therefore
aim at modification of our rela-
tionship with ROTC rather than
abolition, to the end of recogniz-
ing formally the academic weak-
ness of ROTC training as it is
now constituted, and of accomp-
lishing a genuine renovation of
the programs.
We recommend narrowing the
contractural obligations of the
University. specifically because
the ROTC programs do not appear
to us to be academically justif-
able: at the same time encourag-
ing, through recommendation D
below, a reform of the programs
that they might become an edu-
cational asset to the University
and to the citizens exposed to
them...
We have found that both the
law and contracts have been var-
iously inte rpreted, and in a n y
case our concern is to establish
what the future of ROTC should
be at the University, not what an
outside agent wishes it to be.
We offer two alternative recom-
mendations, the first providing for
renegotiation of the ROTC con-
tracts on the basis of several con-
ditions, the second calling for
withdrawal from the contracts if
these conditions are not met.
I. We recommend that the Re-
gents take immediate steps to re-
negotiate the three ROTC con-
tracts with the Department of De-
fense, to the end that each of
the following conditions be met
as son as possible.
A. By contractural agreement
the University grants depmtretnal

S ERE E

status to the ROTC programs.
These are by general agreement
recruiting and training programs
for the military, not proper de-
partmental units. They claim to
develop stud.nt character in cer-
tain ways. but they are not design-
ed to contribute to scholarly re-
search or the creation of know-
ledge.
We therefore recommend that
the militaryv departments of the
University be replaced by "pro-
grans" without departmental
status.
B. The staff of the ROTC pro-
gramns have tended to be men as-
signed to serve three years as mil-
itarv instructors without either
prior or subsequent 'teachings ex-
perience. They are shuttled in and
out of the teaching world as well
as of the University.
We therefore recommend t h a t
staff members of the ROTC pro-
grams be recognized by their mil-
itary titles. academic titles being
granted only to those holding reg-
ular oppintments in a school or
college.
C. By contractual agreement the
University must now provide space
for the military programs, as well
as t he direct financial support
which every department receives
- secretarial services, office ex-
penses, and building maintenance.
Financial support by the Univer-
sity for these programs amounts
to a hiddten contribution to the
DIepartment of Defense. Nyhich al-
ready controls an enormous bud-
get for its owin purPoses,
We therefore recommend t h a t
the Department of Defense main-
tain its own services, or reimburse
the University for services at full
cost. Space for the programs
should not be provided e x c e p t
when the needs of the academic
units of the Universit-y have been
satisfied, and then at the rental
obtaining locally for comparable
commercial property.
The special nature of our rela-
tionship with ROTC, whereby the
units and their staffs became part
of the University not by a histor-
ical development within a field of
knowledge, but by invitation and
contract, necesgsitaited f r om the
beginning a special approach to

performance

_

THURSDAY
OCTOBER 9
2:00 P.M:

ALL
TICKETS
$3.00

RADICAL CAUCUS
MEETING

8 P.M.

Tuesday

TICKETS NOW AT PTP OFFICE

S.A.B.

ereshfirst year
or twoat id he like.
You'll become involved fast.
You'll find we delegate responsi-
bility-to the lim i of your abilitV.
A t IBM, you'll work individual-
ly or on a small team. And be en-
couraged to contribute your own
ideas. You'll advance just as fast
and far as your talents can takeyou.
Here's what three recent grad-
uates are doing.

Petitioning
STUDENT ADVISORY BOARD
ON
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS
Petitions at 1546 S A B
AT-LARGE SEATS

See ROT1C, Page '7
lorte g
-~ GrootvIes
INDIA ART
SHOP
] 3) M',na
1! !i( n

Doug Taylor, B.S. Electronics
Engineering '67, is already a senior
associate engineer working in large-
scale circuit technology. Aided by
computer design, Doug is one of a five-
man team designing integrated
circuits that will go into IBM
computers in the 1970's.

213 S. STATE ST.
OPEN 10-6
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Soon after his intensive training
course, IBM marketing representative
Preston Love, B.S.'66, started helping
key Iowa commissioners solve
problems. Like how to introduce
school kids to computers, without
installing one. His answer: share one
in Chicago by phone cable.
fu T 1 l"'A AX nlr 'tV

Soon after his IBM programmer
training, John Klayman, B.S. Math'68,
began writing programs used by a
computer system to schedule every
event in the Apollo tracking stations.
And when the finished programs were
turned over to NASA Goddard Space
Flight Center, he was responsible for
making them work.

fYI! I' A I ~T)T It' ;

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