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October 02, 1969 - Image 7

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Thursday, October 2, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, October 2, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Against
7/eWi Wal

Tigers

seek

to

continue

rule

over

Big

10

The gri(1 rcti

Ing . . «
(1. polhish joke

By LEE KIRK
Tis fall, a young sports writer's fancy turns to polls and
point spreads and other vicarious farces that vainly try to deter-
mine who is better than who on paper.
Rating teanis, whether it is done by computers, writers, or
coaches, rarely proves anything at all. The proof is in the pud-
ding and inevitably the final test of a team will be found some-
where other than on the pages of Playboy.
Playboy deserves special chastisement for venturing into an
area in which they are totally ignorant, but even Sports Il-
lustrated is prone to gridiron prognostication disasters.
. HUGH IIEFNER'S desire to 'broaden' the horizon of his
readers has led him into some difficulties, and these problems
are nowhere more evident than in their gridde pickings for
1969. They had audacity to pick Houston No. 1 in the nation,
and the Cougars apparently swallowed the bait hook, line, and
sinker. They were thoroughly canned in their first two games,
including a two-touchdown loss to the lowly Oklahoma State
Cowboys.
It has been noted by many that getting on the cover of
Sports Illustrated is a kiss of death. Back in the fifties, when
Oklahoma was unbeatable, Sports Illustrated ran an article on
the Sooner's many secrets. The magazine hit the streets on a
Thursday, and two days later, the Sooners 47 game winning
streak was snapped by Notre Dame.
More recently, look at what happened to poor Purdue last
year. They made the cover of SI and were picked as No. 1 in the
pre-season rating. The result of all this bally-hoo was that
Leroy Keyes and Mike Phipps, the two men who made Purdue
go, spent the season limping around West Lafayette with various
ailments. The Boilermakers were stunned by Ohio State, a
brash poll upstart, and later by Minnesota.
LEW ALCINDOR and UCLA were able to overcome this
hex and it would appear that the reason for their success was
simply that their ability was stronger than the SI curse. This
curse will be the ultimate test of the seemingly overwhelming
power of the Ohio State Buckeyes this season.
Unfortunately, the madness of this idle shooting in the dark
does not end with the opening kickoff on the first day of the
season. Consider the utterly inconsistent methods of the AP and
UPI polls released after each weekend's games.
The simple fact of the matter is that it doesn't matter so
much how you lose or to whom you lose as it does when you lose.
Consider the famous poll bowl, the immortal 1966 game be-
tween Michigan State and Notre Dame. The game ended in a
10-10 tie, and there was no visible or statistical way of giving
one team the slightest edge over the other. Consequently, Notre
Dame was No. 1 in the AP poll and Michigan State No. 1 in UPI.
Unfortunately for the Spartans, the Irish still had one more
game to play, and they butchered Southern Cal, 50-0, and gained
the first spot by a substantial margin in both polls. Yet, the fact
remains that they were not one iota better than State.
Consider the example afforded by our own Wolverines just
last season. After an opening loss to California, the Blue twirled
off eight straight victories and rose to the number four spot in
the polls. A trifle lofty, but typical of the way in which polls
work. Of course, after the OSU game, Michigan became de-
testable to the Top Ten, and wound up at No. 13 with an 8-2
record.
TEXAS, on the other hand, had an 8-1-1 record in the
reglar season and a 36-13 thumping of Tennessee in the Cotton
Bowl. Their record was very similar to Michigan's, but there was
one important difference. The tie and the loss came in the Long-
horns' first two games, and when the dust had setlled on the
long season, Texas was number two.
The ultimate hypocracy of ratings is revealed on a week by
week basis that a blind man could clearly see, and even this early
in the season, examples abound.
West Virginia, No. 18 has a 3-0 record against a schedule
that is less than awe-inspiring. Could the Mountaineers beat
Notre Dame, who dropped out this week?
Indiana humbled Kentucky. Then Kentucky upset Mississip-
pi. Meanwhile, the Hoosiers got upet by California. Mississippi
stayed in the Top Twenty while Indiana dropped from No. 10
to utter oblivion. Could West Virginia beat Indiana?
And what of the case if poor Air Force. They nearly ran
SMU right out of Dallas, and then lost a couple of two-point
heartbreakers to highly-ranked squads from Missouri and Wy-
oming, games they could just as easily have won. Where are
votes for Air Force?
THISSH.1AM manifests itself each week when point spreads
are announced. Michigan is favored over Missouri by two points,
even though Missouri is higher in the rankings. Ranked 13th,
Michigan State is a three point underdog to unranked Notre
Dame. The classic example of this kind of drudgery is the an-
nounced point spread on the Ohio State-Washinton game.
The Buckeyes are favored by 21, but if the Huskes can stay
that close, it will be the upset of the year. Besides, didn't Michi-
gan beat the Huskies by 38? Wait a minute! Who did they say
was number one????
SUBJECTS NEEDED

FOR EXPE RIM ENT:
Must be native speakers of English with
no history of a hearing disorder or speech
impediment,
Subjects needed for four hours at $1.50/
hour.
Please call DAVID P ISONI, 764-2594
from 10 A.M.-12 Midnight or CRLLB, 764-
0510,9-5.

By JOE MARKER
Contributing Editor
Missouri, the nation's ninth
ranked gridiron power, seeks to
extend a lengthly domination of
Big Ten opponents when the
Tigers take to the Michigan Sta-
dium carpet this Saturday.
Dan Devine's charges have re-
peatedly wreaked havoc in their
recent campaigns north, piling up
an 8-1-1 record in encounters withI
Big Ten opposition over the last
eleven years.
The amazing string was launchedI
in 1959 when reserve quarterback
Dick Haas scored from the one-
yard line with only two seconds
left on the Michigan Stadium
scoreboard to give the Tigers a'
20-15 decision and simultaneously
spoil the coaching debut of Bump'
Elliott.
Since then, the only blotches on
Missouri's Big Ten ruination cam-
paign were a 23-12 setback at the
hands of Northwestern in 1963,

This was accomplished despite
the fact that both tackle positions
were manned by rookies substitut-
ing for injured vets Rocky Wal-
lace, an all-Big Eight selection
last year, and Mark Kuhlman.
Wallace and Kuhlman have been
sidelined with a pulled hamstring
and bruised ankle, respectively,
but are probable starters this
week.
Thus it seems that Devine's
earlier-season analysis of his de-
fense: "Some people we're de-
pending on haven't been playing
very well," was a bit premature.
If the defense was supposed to
be a problem, the same certainly
can't be said for the offensive
unit, which features a bone-crush-
ing running attack led by junior
tailback Joe Moore.
Moore punished the Air Force
for 130 yards, and then last week
bedazzled the home-town (St.
Louis) crowd with 150 yards rush-
ing in the first half alone.
The Tigers also have a bruising
fullback in 202-pound Ron Mc-
Bride, who blasted the Air Force
for 86 yards. The other runners,
halfback Jon Staggers and quar-
terback Terry McMillan frequently
carry the ball, but rely on finesse
rather than power to gain yard-
age.

dailly
sportst
NIGHT EDITOR:
CHRIS TERAS
and a scoreless tie with defensive
colossus Minnesota in 1962.
In their latest foray into the
upper Midwest, the Tigers thor-
oughly trounced hapless Illinois,
37-6, last weekend. In that mis-
match, the powerful Missouri'
rushing attack pummeled the Illini
defense for a 21-0 halftime. The
game was a suitable follow-up to
last year's 44-0 rout of the Illini.-
The domination of Big Ten foes
is not out-of-line with the team'sj
overall performance, however, as
the Tigers have traditionally par-

Moore. Staggers, McBride, and,-
MacMillan all took turns deci- - -.._- -
mating the Alabama defensive line
in last season's Gator Bowl, which
many Missouri people view as the Rocky Wallace
highlight of Devine's career. In .
that contest, MacMillan tried only { ... ......:::. ":::..
two passes and completed exactly
none. So far in 1969 the Tigera*or e gSa d i s
aerial game has been just'as weak.
The passing attack has not been AMEIRCAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Division Eastern Division
overly effective, for the simple w L Pet. GB NV L Pct. GB
reason that it has not been needed. Balitniore. 109 53 .673 - New York 100 61 .621 --
For example, against the Air Detroit 90 72 .556 19 chicago 91 70 .565 9
Force, of Missouri's 81 plays from Woston 87 75 .537 22 Pittsburgh 87 74 .540 13
Washington 86 76 .531 23 St. Loris 86 75 .534 14
scrimmage, only 14 were passing New York 80 81 .497 28 .Philadelphia'63 88 .391 31
attempts. Cleveland 62 99 .385 461 Montreal 52 109 .323 48

Fans ~who- e£niovwa~tchingr the I

layed a rock-ribbed defense into puo io te MinwnO n d
Jjn era.gers(inni aignsin the Devine should feel right at home with theCaifornia
er asinitiated n 73-26-701Miz- Tigers and their dependence on Chicago
"zou" has compiled a 73-26-7 rec- overland tactics. After all, as the Kansas Ci
ord and has not suffered through old cliche goes, "the shortest dis- Seattle
a losing season. tance to the goal-line is up the
It is precisely the traditionally midde. rin;
IIefu efnewhmiwssu-nddle."NewYork
It has long been the custom of those responsible for the wisdom powerful defense which was sup-ewheel of G... ,:: Itimor
contained in these lines to present, in addition to the picks of the p d bt A laot h
the 1969 edition. However, in the Chicago
Michigan coach and the Daily sports editors, the selections of the season-opener against Air Force. IM Scores oakland
week's opposing coach and of some illustrious person from the op- in which the Tigers escaped with'
ponent's state. a 19-17 victory, the defenders al- Sigma Phi 14, 'ran Kappa Epsilon 0 Oakland
Sigma Alpha Mu 1, Phi Epsilon 0 (for- Calitorni
All good traditions bite the dust sometime, however, and it looks lowed only 10 first downs the en- felt) Chicagoa
like this week may witness the demise of both the opposing coach's tire afternoon, and were particu- sigma Mu 17 Alpha Delta Phi 6 clevelan
s lary brilliant against the rush. Sigma Phi Episilon 8, Phi Epsilon Pi 0 Only gan

Western Division
96 65
87 73 ;

.596
.544

71 90 .441
68 93 .422
ty 68 93 .422
63 97 .394
Yesterday's Results
ton 3, Boston 2
k 4, Cleveland 3
e ?. Detroit 1, 10 inn.
ity 6, California 0, 5 inn.
4, Minnesota 3
at Seattie, inc.
TodaY's Games
at Seattle, night
a at Kansas City, night
at Minnesota
d at New York, night
res scheduled.

25
28
28
32'

Atlanta
San Franci
Cincinnati
Los Angele
Houston
San Diego

Western Division
93 68
isco 90 71
88 73
es 83 77
81 79
31 110

.578
.559
.547
.519
.506
.317

3
5
42

Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 5, Montreal 4
New York 6, Chicago 5,.12 inn.
St. Louis 6, Philadelphia 5
Houston at Los Angeles, inc.
San Diego 9, San Francisco 4
Today's Games
Montreal at Pittsburgh, night
New York at Chicago
Philadelphia at St. Louis, night
Cincinnati at Atlanta, night
Houston at Los Angeles, night
San Diego at San Francisco

andt the guests grid picks.
This is not, heaven forfend, due to negligence on the part of the
Revolutionary Vanguard Elite. It's just that Missouri's most illus-
trious figure, Harry S. Truman, has found a way to defeat the evils
of modern technology. He refuses to talk on the telephone. Especially
to reporters from college newspapers.
Missouri's coach, Dan Devine, was also non-cooperative, making
himself unavailable for comment when asked to participate in griddle
pickings.
Never fear, though. When help was unobtainable from the out-
side, the Vanguard Elite turned inward, to the Daily's own Little
Suzy Funn, spastic rock and roll columnist. To everyones great edi-
fication, here are her picks, in bold face, of course.

6

F

NOW! YO

tent A K0
U CAN LIVE IT UP!
With Your Own Refrigerator ... In Your Dormitory Room
Now you can have cold liquids (pop, orange juice, etc.), ice cubes
cold cuts for late night snacks, all right in your own room.

1. Missouri at MICHIGAN
2. Nebraska at MINNESOTA
3. Michigan State at NOTRE
DAME
4. UCLA at NORTHWESTERN
5. Stanford at PURDUE
6. SYRACUSE at Wisconsin
7. IOWA STATE at Illinois
8. INDIANA at Colorado
9. OHIO STATE at Washington
10. ARIZONA at Iowa
11. Mississippi at ALABAMA
at Birmingham, Ala., night

12. FLORIDA STATE at Florida
13. South Carolina at GEORGIA
14. SOUTHERN CAL at Oregon
State
15. Oregon at WASHINGTON ST.
16. Tulane at BOSTON COLLEGE
17. Holy Cross at DARTMOUTH
18. Maryland at WAKE FOREST
night
19. Texas Tech at OKLAHOMA
STATE
20. Morevian at WILKES

E

a

~SpeciaI Rate
APA PRODUCTION OF
2:99 P.M.
Refre;
Question in
and Vane
Answer R'
Session Mic
Le

GKETS
3.00

eshments
n the
idenberg
oom
chigan
eague

Rent the Mini-Kool Compact Refrigerator-ONLY $7.00 Per Month

'rirIcC t C Al 0 AT

MENDEl
B

LSSOHN THEATRE
OX OFFICE

LIGHT and COMPACT. This little beauty weighs only,
45 pounds total and measures a small 20xl7x18.
VERSATILE and SPACIOUS. All three shelves are ad-
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to six 6-packs of soft drinks.
LOW, LOW CURRENT LOAD. When running, this unit
draws the same amount of power as a 45-watt light
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QUICK. Makes ice cubes in 45 minutes.
ATTRACTIVE. Styled in tasteful walnut trim.
SERVICE: If this refrigerator should ever fail for any
reason we will immediately replace it at no charge.
APPROVED. This refrigerator meets all requirements
of University Housing Authority.

I

Ur
UNION-LEAGUE
NEED WE SAY MORE?
AT 7:30 TONIGHT
In the Union Ballroom
"TG- -\A1/:I I Da,.

HOW TO RENT A MINI-KOOL

FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY CALL 769-3550 DURING REGULAR STORE HOURS 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M. OR STOP
AT 211 S. STATE, ANN ARBOR.

ONLY $7.00 Per Month!

Split this with a roommate and
That's $3.50 a month, or 12c a day.

MISSOURI vs. MICHIGAN
FOOTBALL

HURRY! OUR SUPPLY IS LIMITED!

w un. n3ff Uin

rn r_ r- r vvo* r

1 '1 1

E

$1U KE 3PIC.KUPI/2\ FLEE DEIEs IRY

Y

0

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