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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: '64-0334

MICHIGANENSIAN SENIOR
PIC ES

Thursday, October 2, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Threatened

juror

leaves

---SIGN UP IN

THE DIAG--

10-4-Monday thru Friday
THIS IS THE LAST WEEK!

DISNEY'S
Alice In Wonderland
"Disney the auteur. In the Pinnochio tradition."-
Sarris
-plus-
PETER SELLERS
Muckinese Battlehorn
"This reminds me of Citizen Kane, but not very
much."-Orson Welles
---plu s-
W. C. FIELDS
The Fatal Glass of Beer
"Everybody must get stoned."-Dylan

By JENNY STILLER
Special to the Daily
CHICAGO - Kristi A. King, a 23
year old juror with family connections
to VISTA, was dismissed yesterday
from the Chicago Eight trial jury when
she said that because of a threat sign-
ed "The Black Panthers" she could not
be impartial.
Miss King was replaced on the jury
by the first alternate, Kay S. Richards,
22.
The threatening letter, which stated
simply, "You are being watched," was
delivered to her home Tuesday morn-
ing while Miss King was in the court-
room. Her parents opened the letter,
which was addressed to "The Kristi
family," and called the FBI.
The matter came to the court's at-

tention when the FBI informed U.S.
Atty Charles Foran, the prosecutor in
the case, of the letters existence.
Miss King learned of the threat only
yesterday morning, when Julius Hoff-
man handed her a photocopy of the
document and asked her is she had ever
seen the original. To the surprise of
judge, lawyers, defendants and specta-
tors, she answered "No."
The judge then asked Miss King if
she could continue, after having seen
the document, to be a fair and im-
partial puror. "No sir," was her reply.
The defense protested to the judge
that "Your honor has revealed this let-
ter to this juror . . . and caused her to
answer as she did." The objection was
overruled when Assistant U.S. Atty.
Richard D. Schultz replied, "None of

us knew whether she had seen the let-
ter."
The defense also objected to Judge
Hoffman's order to Miss King that
she not speak to anyone about the
trial, but the objection was overruled.
Defendent David Dellinger told re-
porters that eight defendents objected
strongly to "her being gagged by the
judge." He said that "we are prepared
to offer a lawyer to Miss King, if she
should want to fight" the order period.
A reporter of a prestigious Eastern
,daily expressed his willingness to at-
tempt an interview of Miss King in
order to bring about a test case, pend-
ing the approval of his editor.
A second juror, Ruth L. Petersen, who
had received an identical letter and
called it to the attention of the judge,
remained on the jury after declaring she

Lihicagi
believed her judgement would rem
impartial.
A third woman, Mildred Burns,
questioned because she had learned
the letter from Mrs. Peterson. M
Burns also remains on the jury.
Defense attorney William Kuns
had earlier moved for the court to lh
an evidentiary hearing on defe
charges that the threatening leti
were sent by the FBI or another gove
ment agency. The motion was den
by Judge Hoffman.
Kunstler .proposed that the ju
subpoena six witnesses:
-Defendant Bobby Seale, to tes
as to the discipline and tactics oft
Black Panther Party;
-John Wall, the former assist
U.S. attorney who tried the Spo
Coffin conspiracy case, to testify t
Ryan
new,

u 8 trial
ain a panel of 5,000 perspective jurors un-
derwent FBI investigation before serv-
was ing on the jury for that trial;
of -J. Edgar Hoover, to testify as to
Ars. whether the FBI was similarly involved;
-Joseph Stanley, an FBI agent act-
tler ing as consultant to the prosecution in
old the current case, to testify as to the
nse agency's role in it.
ters -Atty. General John Mitchell, to
rn- testify as to the Justice Department's
ied extra-trial activities in conjunction
with the Chicago eight; and
dge --A mathematician, to testify on the
probability that two jurors chosen at
tify random from a panel of 12 would be just
the the two whom the defense felt to be
most sympathetic to their cause.
ant The motion was denied after Foran
ck- said, "The government objects to this
hat frivolous, idiotic proposal."
LexpectSS

I

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

OCTOBER 3-4
7-9:15 Aud. A

FRI.-SAT.

75c (cheap)

NEXT WEEK:
RAY'S
Two Daughters

L 1
EDWARD W. BROOKE (R-Mass), the only black member of
the Senate, yesterday urged President Nixon to withdraw his
nomination of Clement F. Haynesworth to the Supreme Court.
It was also reported that Republican Senate Minority Whip,
Robert P. Griffin (Mich.), has suggested to President Nixon thatI
his appointment of Haynesworth be withdrawn.
Although there has been criticism of Nixon's nominee from both
Democrats and Republicans, Brooke was the first senator to publiclyI
call for Nixon to withdraw Haynesworth's name.
In other action yesterday on the Haynesworth nomination, the
Senate Judiciary Committee postponed until next week at the earliest
a vote on Haynesworth.
Sen. Birsch Bayh (D-Ind) charged that he was gettng a "run-I
around" in efforts to check on Haynsworth's financial records." I

0
in

Collins trial

By IRA HOFFMAN
Robert W. Ryan, defense attorney for accused murderer
John N. Collins, said yesterday at a hearing in Circuit Court
that he knew of a witness whose testimony would contradict
allegations that Collins killed Karen Sue Beineman last
July 23 between noon and 3:30 p.m.
Ryan first made a motion for discovery which would
grant the defense access to the prosecution's evidence. Ryan
told Circut Judge John W. Conlin, "We know of a witness
and the prosecutors knows of a witness that will testify that
Mr. Collins was at his place of business at a crucial time."
Ryan said the name of his witness- is Joe Patton of the
J. and J. Cycle shop in Ypsilanti. Ryan has been unable to
contact Patton for several--

9

STATE
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662-6264
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roduced in association with Universal Pictur
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WINNER
B EST
ACTRESS
CANNES
FILM
FESTIVAL
1969
Look Magazine
-Newsweek
-Playboy
-ModemoiselIle
.Y. Daily News
N.Y Times
agazine
n 2ND
BIG
es Ltd. WEEK

SEN. J. W. FULBRIGHT (D-Ark) broke a nine month virtual
silence on the Vietnam war and blasted GOP Leader Hugh Scott's
(Penn.) call for a 60-day moratorium on criticism of Pres. Nixon's
war policy.
Sen. Fulbright said "I object to the policy that we should all keep
quiet and hope for the best."
Sens. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass) and Frank Church (D-
Idaho) joined Fulbright in his criticism of the moratorium.
Sen. John G. Tower (R-Texas) and Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz)
warned of the dangers of a withdrawal. Tower said "It becomes in-
creasingly apparent, that the intensification of military pressure on
} our enemies is the only thing that will bring them to terms.
THE WEST GERMAN MARK soared to a record high on the
world exchange yesterday.

I

-Daily-Jay Cassidy
Kelley at recelt news ()llferenlce
Court delays Kelley
earin unti Oct.29

Investors appear to believe that the export possibiliites of industry
in Britain, France, Holland and Switzerland are improving steadily
as the mark and thus German goods become more expensive.
* *
REV. JAMES E. GROPPI, who led three days of welfare
marches on the Wisconsin Capitol, was arrested yesterday for pos-
sible probation violation.
Groppi, who was arrested for disorderly conduct in Monday's
takeover of the Assembly chambers, was convicted last February ofI
resisting arrest in a Milwaukee open housing demonstration. He hasI
been on probation subject to revocation if arrested and convicted again
for civil disorder, civil disobedience, or any other crime.
Groppi said that the welfare mothers would continue to press
their demands for legislative restoration of welfare cuts and urban

By ROBERT SKLAR
Ann Arbor Argus publisher Ken'
Kelley's obscenity hearing was ad-'
journed yesterday until Oct. 29 by
District Judge S. J. Elden. Elden',
postponed the case to allow the
defense time to prove that neither
Kelley nor his newspaper h a v e
violated t h e Michigan obscenity
statute under which he was ar-
raigned.
The prosecution sought to es-

aids in the state budget. tablish that the two Argus issues,
depicting the picture in question,
MILITARY OFFICIALS say they are investigating charges a cancelled check signed by Kel-
that information officers in Vietnam have been censoring news ley made out to his printer, and
broadcasts. Kelley's "assumed name" busi-
The review is being undertaken after complaints by several en- ness record in the county file were
sufficient grounds for a trial on
listed men, and the former chief of the armed forces network in thenharoubsh ing on
Vietnm. Rndal J. oody the charge of publishing obscene
Vietnam, Randall J. Moody,.aeil
Moody said in a letter to Rep. Chalmers P. Wylie (R-Ohio) that Kelley's attorney, Mark Stick-
he is confident an investigation would expose the Armed Forces Net- cold, contended that the prosecu-
work as a propaganda organ rather than a legitimate news dis- tion failed to prove t h e picture
seminating agency. was obscene.

"For material to be qualified as
obscene, the dominant theme must
appeal to the purient interest, of-
fend contemporary community
standards, and be utterly without
redeeming social merit, and thisI
was not. proven." stressed Stick-
cold.
He further alleged that the sta-
tute Kelley is charged under deals
only with the distribution a n d
selling of obscene material, not
its publication or printing.
"Since a completely different
statute encompasses printing, the'
prosecution can only sue the en-
tire publication f o r distributing
o b s c e n e materials," remarked
Stickcold.
When asked if he participated
in the distribution of this partic-
ular issue, Kelley replied, "I was
not even around."

i,

months.
According to a reported from
the Detroit Free Press, Patton
said Collins came in to the cycle
shop at approximately 1:00 p.m.
and stayed "about an hour". Pat-
ton also has given a statement to
the police and the defense attorn-
ey saying that he and two me-
chanics saw Collins in the shop
on July 23.
Diane Goshe, owner of Wigs by
Joan shop, testified at the pre-
liminary examination last Aug-
ust that Collins had picked up
Miss Beineman at 12:15.
"The critical time of the mur-
der was 12:15 to 3:30 p.m.," said
Mike Devine, the State Supreme
Court official in charge of dissem-
inating information for the trial.
"If we are not allowed to in-
spect anyrphysical evidence, it
shouldn't be used at the trial,"
Ryan said.
Judge Conlin at first d e n i e d
Ryan's motion. "If they {t h e
defense can pinpoint a specific
claim" Conlin explained that he
would then grant the motion.
Ryan then asked for all in-
formation concerning any blood
or hair samples and other scien-
tific data which might be used
as evidence against Collins.
Conlin ordered Williams to give
Ryan all scientific evidence the
prosecution has.
Conlin suspended further dis-
cussion until 10:00 a.m. tomorrow.

Sil i
party
The White Panthers are plan-
ning a gigantic "birthday party"
for John Sinclair in Detroit today.
The party will be followed by a
march on the State Capitol to de-
liver a petition to Gov. William
Milliken. The petition calls for
Sinclair's immediate release from
prison.
Sinclair, the White Panther
minister of information, was con-
victed this summer for possession
of marijuana and is presently
serving from 9 t to 10 years in a
maximum security prison in Mar-
quette.
Proceeds from the party will be
used to establish appeal funds for
Sinclair.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $10 by mail,
Sumner Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

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