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October 01, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-01

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 1, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Football-Doughty's

one

love

By DAVE BEEMON
They lurk everywhere. Big,
thick-chested boys, their T-shirts
bulging . . . wearing sneakers.
It's a common sight in the lobbies
of that institution decorated in
modern 50's dormitory style:
South Quadrangle.
Incarcerated in this nightmare
of blond wood paneling and rip-
pled glass windows (with a few
potted plants) is a special group
of fellows: Glenn Doughy and his
friends. Judging by their size, one

wouldn't be at all surprised if the
majority played football.
Doughty himself (a smaller
specimen, at 6'2", 190 pounds) is,
indeed, a football player.
For the past two weeks the
sophomore tailback, number 22,
has been ripping, skipping, and
tipping through enemy defenses
with apparent ease, rushing for
329 yards in two games.
He appears to be faster and
quicker (from one reporter'sI
viewpoint) the Ron Johnson ever
was.

Against
7k eWa/l

Garvie Craw-
min, ire the shadows
By ERIC SIEGEL
Sometime around the middle of last October, when the
Michigan football team was beginning to gell and people were
starting to think about a January vacation in Pasadena, Garvie
Craw was saying that Ron Johnson is a great runner.
A few days ago, after the Michigan football t e a m had
thrashed its first two foes in convincing style and football was
beginning to experience its annual fall revival, Garvie Craw
was saying that Glenn Doughty, too, is a great runner.
Craw is well qualified to judge the ability of these two men.
As the starting fullback for the Wolverines the past two sea-
sons, he has probably had as much opportunity as anyone on
the team to observe the skills of these two nimble halfbacks at
close range. He has also probably had more to do with their
success.
THE BIG MAN inside jersey number 48, regarded by many
as one of the finest blocking backs in college football, earned
his reputation helping to clear a path for the Wolverines' break-
away backs. Countless times Craw's right shoulder, strategically
rammed somewhere between a defender's shoulder blade and his
abdomen, has helped Johnson and, more recently, Doughty, get
an extra five yards, score a touchdown or break into the open
field for a long gain. If statistics were kept on blocking, Craw
would undoubtedly have more busted heads to his credit than
one of Sheriff Harvey's deputies.
Craw says that Doughty is ."quicker to leave his blockers
and go off on his own" than Johnson was, but he doesn't think
this difference in the running style of Doughty, the shifty soph-
omore who is threatening to wear out Don Canham's new carpet
by mid-season, and Johnson, the Wolverines' super-halfback of
last season who is now playing the role of super-rookie for the
Cleveland Browns of the NFL, will-force him to change his style
of blocking.
I'll probably be blocking the exact same way for Glenn as I
did for Ron last year," Craw said. "The concept of blocking is
really pretty basic." Apparently, the basics of blocking to Garvie
Craw are 1) run out to meet the defender head-on and 2) knock
him down and out of the play.
BUT CRAW IS MORE than just a good blocker; he is also
a consistent one. As one observer in the press box remarked early
in the third quarter of last Saturday's game against Washing-
ton, after Craw had cleared the way for Doughty's 21-yard
jaunt around the right side of the Huskies' line, "I've yet to see
an end sweep where-Craw hasn't taken his man out of the play."
Craw has been taking opposing linebackers and defensive
halfbacks out of plays since mid-season of his sophomore year,
when he broke into the starting lineup for the first time. But
although his blocking has gone from shin-shattering to bone-
crushing in the intervening period, he has played in the shadows
of the same people he has helped thrust into the limelight.
THIS SEASON, HOWEVER, Craw was expected to run more
often as Coach Bo Schembechler instituted an option T offense.
Ironically, though, two of the untested members of the Wolver-
ines' new offense-Doughty and junior quarterback Don Moor-
head-are performing even better than their predecessors. Craw
has thus not been called on to run the ball as frequently as had
been expected, and is, once again, in the shadow of those who
follow him down field.
In the Washington game, too, Mr. Reliable picked up some
important yardage, even though he only carried ten times for
a total of 17 yards. With 6:51 gone in the first quarter, for
example, Craw crashed off tackle for three yards and a first
down inside the Huskies' ten. Moorhead then hit tight end
Jim Mandich on the next play for a seven yard TD pass.
Then in the second quartr of the same game, with the ball
on the Washington four. Craw ran the ball down to the three,
then the half yard line, before Moorhead, after faking to Craw,
took the ball around right end for the score.
MOORHEAD, WHO SCORED on that play again later in
the game, commented afterwards, "They were looking for
Garvie up the middle -again, so an end-around was a good
bet. I scored on that play twice during the Vanderbilt game, too,
and we'll probably be using it again this season."
But despite the value of Craw's running on key plays,
and his value as a decoy, the Michigan fullback's forte is still
blocking. But his expertise on the ability of blocking backs
is a bit suspect.
"Besides being a great runner, Glenn (Doughty) is also the
best blocking back on the team," Craw said awhile ago. I don't
know about that, Garvie. Not with you in there, anyway.

For precisely this r e a s o n,
Doughty was being confronted by
a Daily reporter in the dining
room of South Quad (gleaming
aqua wall tiles and stainless steel
hardware). Doughty was wearing
a faded short sleeve sweatshirt.
An hour of questions and an-
swers followed, the reporter ob-
viously being influenced by super-
ficial first impressions. However,
one impression was so glaring it
had to be accurate - Glenn
Doughty's whole life centers on
football.
Said Doughty, "I've wanted to
make the pros since I was born.
It's my major goal in life. I love
it that much. You have to love
the game if you want to succeed
in it. If I didn't dig football I
wouldn't be in college."
A very honest comment the re-
porter scratched his head,.
Not every football player will
admit that he's in college primar-
ily to play football. Doughty ad-
mits that the college game is
getting more professional all the
time, but he likes t that way.
It's no surprise that Doughty's
idol is found among the ranks of
professional football. Namely, a
Mr. Dick Butkus +middle line-
backer for the Chicago Bears).
Said Doughty (with a kind look
in his eyess, "The man, to me,
is the ideal player. He has the
meanness, aggressiveness, a n d
animalistic characteristics that a
football player should have. The
Paul Armstrong, a senior
from Ferndale, Michigan, has
been elected captain of the 1970
Michigan track team. Arm-
strong, a two-year letterman,
runs the 660- and 880-yard
runs and is a member of the
two-mile relay team.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOE MARKER
man is out of sight . . my
hero."
To many people, it may sound
strange to hear a running back'
like Doughty idolize the human
animal, Butkus. However, Doughy
ty's obsession is not unfounded.
In high school (Detroit Pershing)
he not only played running back,
but also middle linebacker.
Doughty likes to hit.
He also goes to class (a phy-
sical education major thinking
about switching to business), and
finds little time for anything else.
Doughty likes his surroundings.
"Ann Arbor is quite different
from Detroit. Number one, t h e
hippies; number two, the prices;
and number three, the place is
tight, crowded. But .. . I like the
professors. They seem to have a
genuine interest in you . . . and
I like the people, they're nicea.,;
thei'e aren't too many radicals."
Doughty elaborated on t h e
"hippies" (after some prodding),
"The hippies are genuine. Some-
times you don't know if they're
fags or straight . . . but they're
not phonies. It's their thing. If
they want to do that--go ahead."
Doughty himself is pretty
straight. He admits that to be a
football player you have to be.
Coach Bo Schembechler is pretty
strict on two counts: no drinking
or smoking. But Doughty doesn't
mind, "I don't do any of that
stuff anyway."

Politically, Doughty calls him-
self "middle of the road". "I'm
content. I don't have any reason
to go one way or the other."
Enough interrogation. It was
clear that Doughty wanted to
talk about one thing - football.
He attributes his abilities to God,
and his success in the past two
games to the Michigan line.
"You wouldn't be talking to me
if it wasn't for them."
He insisted on giving a plug
for his parents, "My mother and
father have been my guiding
light. They always kept my head
on the ground and always stuck
by me. I got the best in the world."
From All-State honors in high
school, "Ya, I made all that stuff,"
he was recruited to Michigan.
With that, Doughty left for his
room, perhapsto study, perhaps
to talk football with his room-
mate, Butch Carpenter. The re-
porter gathered his notes to-
gether and thought for a while.
Doughty was obviously preoccup-
ied with football. He didn't have
time for other things. No protest-
ing, picketing, or sitting in. He
said, "I'm not involved in any of
those things." He didn't even have
time for playing around.
But on the other hand, he's
doing his thing (excuse the
phrase) . . . and loving it. Per-
haps this is enough to make some
people very jealous of Mr. Glenn
Doughty.

-Daily--Jay Cassidy
SOPhOMORE RUNNING BACK Glen Doughty (22) breaks loose from a pack of Washington de-
fenders in Saturday's 45-7 rout of the Huskies. Doughty blitzed the huge Huskies' defense for 191
yards in 29 carries, as the Wolverines sailed to their second straight victory of the season. In his
first varsity game two weeks ago he garnered 138 yards in 15 carries giving him a total of 324 yards
gained, fourth in the nation.

PLAY-OFF WITH METS:

Braves
ATLANTA ,41-The red-hot At-
lanta Braves captured the National'
League Western Division cham-
pionship yesterday, cutting down
Cincinnati 3-2 with a two-run
seventh inning rally capped by
Rico Carty's tie-breaking sacrifice
f~y.
The Braves' 10th consecutive
victory gave them a three-game
lead over second place San Fran-
cisco with two to play, mathema-
tically ousting the Giants.
Carty's fly to right sent Felix
Millan scampering home with the
run that gave ace knuckleballer
Phil Niekro his 23rd victory of the
season--including six straight over
the hard-hitting Reds.
Hoyt Wilhelm, the 46-year-old
relief specialist obtained by At-
lanta for the September stretch
drive, stymied the Reds over the

land

Western

title

last two innings after Niek, o. 23-
13, left the game for a pinch hit-
ter in the big seventh.
The Reds raked Niekro for four
hits in the fifth-Lee May's lead-
off double and singles by Woody
Woodward, Pete Rose and Tommy
Helms--to score twice for a 2-1
edge.
The Braves cane back when
Mike Lum opened the home sev-
enth with a sinle to center and
Ralph Garr, batting for Nie'ro.,
walked.
Wayne Granver. the Reds' rec-
ord-setting bullpen ace, replaced
starter Gary Nolan and got Felix
Millan to bunt into a force at
third. But Tony Gonzalez singled
to left, scoring Garr to tie tihe
game 2-2. and after Hank Aia on
walked to fill the bases. Carty de-
livered the winning sacrifice fly.

- Ma; erLeague Standings

:1.lIE;R[CA' LEAGUE

NAION AL LEAGU'E
Eastern D1ivision

Eastern Division
W 1.
Bltitmiore, 108 53
D~etroit 90 '71
Boston 87 74
Washingion 85 76
New York 79 81
Cleveland 62 98
Wesiern Division
Minesot a 96 64
Oakland 86 '73
California 71 89
Chicago 67 93
Kansas City 67 93
Seattle 63 96

Pect.
.671
.559
.510
.528
.494
.388
.600
.541
.444
.419
.419
.396

G1
18
21
23
45.
25
29
29
32'-.:

New York
Chlicago
Pittsburgh
St. L.ouis,
Philadelphia
Montreal

-w
99
91
86
85.
63

1.
61
69
'74
97
108

Pet.
.619
.569
.538
.531
'394
.325
.5,78
.560
.547
.522
.503
.314

G1
8
13
14
36
47
3
5
9
12
42

Western Division
Atlanta 93 68
San Francisco 89 70
Cincinnati 88 73
Los Angeles 83'76
Houston 80 '79
SanlDiego, 30 109

westertday-s Resuits
Washington 7, Boston 2
New York 8, Cleveland 2
Detroit 4. Baltimore 3
Kansas City 8. Califorina 5
Minnesota 4, (hicago 3
Oakland at Seattle', inc.
Today's Games
Oakland at Seattle, night
California at Kansas City, night
Chicago at Minnesota
Detroit at Baltimore. night
Boston at Washington, night
Cleveland at New York, night

Yesterday's Results
'hihaelphia 4, St. Louis 3
:Atlanta 3, Cincinnati 2
Iloiston at Los Angeles. inc.
San D)iego at San Francisco, inc.
Today's ;ames
New York at Chicago
Philadelphia at St. Louis, night
Houston at Los Angeles, night
Montreal at Pittsburgh, night
San Diego at San Francisco

(15'ruddeIPickiu'
Ready for the cop out of the year? Who would believe it even of
uac. It seems the intrepid muggers succeeded in smuggling a spy into
the closely guarded Daily training camp and didn't like the looks of a
couple of 240-pound tackles they saw lounging about. So the mighty
muggers begged a temporary(?) reprieve to revise their strategy. True
to their code of offering a helping hand to the downtrodden, the
Daily Libels granted their petition even in the face of such blatent
larceny, secure in the knowledge of their ultimate superiority.
But never fear, faithful gridde pickers. The wonderous wizards
that nightly inhabit the Daily sports department have come up with
an equally important battle in its place. Instead of having to pick the
Libels as obvious favorites, you'll get a chance to test your skill on
the likes of Moravian versus Wilkes.
Just submit your pick for that one along with the winners of
the other nineteen games of the week to the Daily office by midnight
Friday, and win yourself a delicious Cottage Inn pizza to celebrate
the Wolverines' triumph over the Missouri Tigers and the Libels
eventual victory over the Muggers.

Official
Harvard
Strike Shirt

--Daily-Sara Krulwich
Cr(w (48), Illootihead (27) clear the paIth
PILOT RETAINED:
Angels rehire Phillips

As pictured on covers
of LIFE and NEWSWEEK
Giant RED FIST
with BLACK LETTERS
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SWEATSHIRT $3.50
Short Sleeve
SIZES: Sm-34/36
Md-38/40
Lg -42/44
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8 for $1.00
PREPAID BY
MAIL ONLY

1. Missouri at MICHIGAN
(pick score)

ANAHEIM (U'-The California
Angels re-hired Harold "Lefty"
Phillips as their manager for 1970
yesterday, and he immediately in-
dicated a desire to acquire Richie
Allen or some other heavy hitter
for his American League baseball
club.
Phillips, 50. took over the field
generalship of the Angels last May
27 from Bill Rigney, with the club
languishing last in the Weste-n
Division with an 11-28 record.
His club played .50Q ball since
then and currently, at 71-88, has
third place clinched.

Salar.y teims for the one-year
pact were not revealed. Gene
Autry, the Angels' board chair-
man, said, "We haven't even talk-
ed salary. There was so much
prophesying on whether Lefty
would be back, we decided to
make the announcement that we
would go with him again."

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Nebraska at Minnesota
Michigan State at Notre Dame
UCLA at Northwestern
Stanford at Purdue
Syracuse at Wisconsin
Iowa State at Illinois
Indiana at Colorado
Ohio State at Washington
Arizona at Iowa

11. Mississippi vs. Alabama at
Birmingham, Ala., night
12. Florida State at Florida
13. South Carolina at Georgia
14. Southern Cal at Oregon State
15. Oregon at Washington State
16. Tulane at Boston College
17. Holy Cross at Dartmouth
18. Maryland at Wake Forest,
night
19. Texas Tech at Oklahoma
State
20. Moravian at Wilkes

t

STRIKE SHIRT
Box 6
Glencoe, 1ll.
60022

The Daily
Sports Staff
Student
Insurance
Representative:
Pamela Wyeth
1548 SA.B.

RADICAL FILM SERIES
presents
PARIS IN THE MONTH OF MAY
Distributed by Newsreel
French students take to the streets to breathe the air
of revolution, and almost succeed in toppling the
DeGaulle government. As workers call massive strikes
in support of student demands, workers and students
stand united behind the closed doors of the factories,
and fight pitched battles with the police in the
streets of Paris.
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