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August 27, 1969 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-08-27

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Martin

looks

to

frosh

to

boost

Thinclad

Wednesday, August 27, 1969
ho pes

By PHIL HERTZ
Last September Ohio State football coach
Woody Hayes called his new sophomores the
best bunch of newcomers he had ever seen in
his years as grid mentor of the Buckeye in-
stitution.
Possibly the only regrets Hayes has about this
group is that they couldn't have played varsity
as frosh. But this year, for the first time, in all
sports except football and basketball, freshmen
will be able to represent their schools in varsity
competition.
One such sport is track and field. However,
withthe new system going into effect this year,
both incoming frosh and last season's first
year men will flood the rubberized track on
Ferry Field.
Wolverine track coach Dave Martin welcomes
the change, "The use of freshmen on the varsity
level will make the Big Ten a much stronger
aggregation. The conference should be better able
to compete on the national level."
The Michigan cindermen should be better
able to compete also and improve on their third
place finish in the 1969 version of the conference
outdoor championships.
In the Big Ten indoor meet Michigan racked
up thirty-five points, thirty less than conference
titlist Wisconsin and seven less than Indiana.
The results were a trifle disappointing for
Sol Es)pie: Returning in the sprints Martin. "I figured Wisconsin would capture the
A dvrtsing Career.?
The University of Michigan only offers classroom exposure to adver-
tising (i.e. theory and prerequisites).
Air r .trsgan a
offers you EXPERIENCE in selling and servicing local advertisers,
layout, design and copy writing, and promotions.I
Stop by 420 Maynard St.
Mon.-Fri., 1-4 P.M., and start your career

title but I thought we'd be able to finish
second,"
Two Wolverines, both seniors, captured in-
dividual titles. Larry Midlam took the 70-yard
low hurdles title in a record tying 7.6 seconds.
Bob Wedge, who is also on the football team,
captured the triple jump crown by leaping
48 feet. Another departee, captain Ron Kutsch-
inski, the only Big Ten athlete on the U.S.
Olympic track team, captured third in 1000-
yard run with a Michigan record 2:07.9.
In the NCAA indoor championships Michigan
scored seven points, finishing eleventh in a field
of 91 teams. Kansas won the title with 41
points. Michigan's points were due to a second
place finish by Kutschinski in the 1000-yard run
and a third place finish in the two mile relay.
In addition to Kutschinski, Midlam and
Wedge, the Wolverines will also lose sprinters
George Hoey and Leon Grundstein and high
jumper Gary Knickerbocker, a two-time Big
Ten champion among others.
Martin hopes that the two groups of new-
comers can provide replacements. Martin listed
Gene Brown, a 9.5 sprinter, Larry Wolfe, who has
vaulted 16 feet 1% inches, Ken Hamilton, who
ran the two mile in 8:56, and John Mann, who
high jumped six' eight" during the past cam-
paign, as key additions from last year's frosh
squad.
All but Mann surpassed or equaled varsity
marks during the 1968-1969 season and Wolfe
set a meet record at the Kentucky Relays while
- - - - - - - - -

he was competing as an unattached independent.
Martin feels the new freshmen will also pro-
vide a lift for the team. According to Coach
Martin, "Three of the better boys are Eric
Chapman, Tom Swan and Trevor Mathews.
Chapman, from Willowdale, Ontario, has run
the half mile in 1:51." Swan, from Princeton,
Illinois, is a miler and Mathews from Brooklyn
Boy's High is a quarter miler.
Martin will also have a fine nucleus of re-
turnees. Warren Bechard, runner-up to Wedge
at the Big Ten meet, should be a threat in the
triple jump. Other threats include Lorenzo Mont-
gomery in the 440, Giulio Catallo in the shot put,
Sol Espie in the sprints, distance runner Gary
Gold, broad jumper Ira Russell, "pole vaulter
Ron Shortt, miler Rick Storrey and middle
distance runner Norm Cornwall, . who Martin
called "the surprise of the year."
Michigan track Coach Dave Martin wants
you.
If you have any interest at all in track, Mar-
tin would like to come down and talk to him
or assistant Jack Harvey and Ken Burnley at
the Sports Building at the corner of Hoover and
State.
Martin said, "Someone will be down here
during the entire orientation period and we'
would like to speak to anyone with a track
back ground. Too often athletes who can make
the team don't come out because they did not
receive an athletic scholarship. Several members
of the team are not on scholarship."
SA
f!)

Grapplers seek
nightmare cure

If youre
CHICKEN
Then don't join
the DAILY
BUSINESS STAFF
(It takes guts to tolerate our staf

-
z.
r
+:

By JOE MARKER
Contributing Sports Editor
With nightmarish memories of
last year's Big Ten Wrestling
Tournament behind them, Mich-
igan's grapplers can look for-
ward to a significant improve-
ment next year.
In that tourney Michigan
could manage only a third-place
tie with Northwestern, its worst
finish in many years under
coach Cliff Kean.
However, help is on the way in
the form of this year's fresh-
man wrestling crop which edged
out Michigan State to win the
Michigan Freshman Wrestling
Tournament last February.
These first-year men will bol-
ster a team that lost only two
of last year's regulars through
graduation.
The toughest shoes to fill will
be those of last year's captain
and 177-pounder Pete Cornell,
who capped his career with a
runner-up finish in' the NCAA
tournament after copping sec-
ond place in the Big Tens. In
his n a t io n a 1 championship
match with Iowa State's Chuck
Jean, Cornell led until well into
the third period before bowing.
He is joined in the graduation
circle by 137-pounder Geoff
Henson, who compiled a 10-3-1
record to aid the Wolverine
cause.
The other Wolverine who will
be lost is Steve Rubin, who was
injured most of last season. It
was hoped that he would be
granted another year of eligibil-
ity, but that possibility prob-
ably went out the window when
he competed twice in early-
season action.
Ty Belknap, who as a fresh-
man competed in the NCAA
tournament in place of the in-
jured Lou Hudson, is given a
good chance to land a starting
berth this year. His biggest
problem is that he is trying
to bust into the strongest part
of the Michigan line-up, the
lower weight classes.
Join The Daily
Sports Staff

Belknap, who wrestled at 130
pounds as a freshman, will com-
pete with Big Ten champion Lou
Hudson, Tim Cech, and Mike
Rubin. However he will be aided
by the realignment of weight
classes, which amounts to hav-
ing four lower weight categories
instead of three.
Another Wolverine champ in
the F r e sh m a n Tournament,
Thurlon Harris, will probably
start at either 177 or 190
pounds. He adds strength to the
upper weight classes, which are
anchored by Jesse Rawls, last
year's Big Ten champion at 167
and third-place finisher in the
nationals.
Herb Sudduth at 145 attempts
to crash the middle part of the
Wolverine line-up, while sopho-
mores-to-be Jim Thomas (190),
George Surgent, Preston Henry,
Jim Hagan, Mark King (134,
Paul Paquin (142), Mark Ky-
rias, and Brian Boyce, will bat-
tle the veterans for the remain-
ing starting posts,
With last year's freshmen,
along with veterans Tom Quinn
t165), Lane Headrick (150), Jim
Sanger (158), and Charles Reil-
ly (150-158), ready to fill the
line-up, the only real problem
for the team remains at heavy-
weight.
Here, just as last year, there
is no one being considered for
tha spot. As assistant coach
Rick Bay comments, "There
just aren't any really good
heavyweights to recruit." The
hope is that someone from the
football team might step in to
fill the gap, as Pete Drelmann
did early last year.
Although at the moment first
lace inrthehconference seems
out of reach, the Wolverines
might make it to the runner-up
position. It appears that defend-
ing champion Michigan State,
with six of its seven Big Ten
champions returning, has too
much for the rest of the league.
As Bay puts it, "State has to
be the number one team right
now. However, Iowa (runner-up
last year) has been hit heavy by
graduation, much harder than
we, and Northwestern probably
won't be as strong, so we might
do all right against those teams."

TV RENTALS
No Deposit FREE service
per month .eq.re
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SERVING BIG 1O SCHOOLS SINCE 196

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CLUB STARTING DATES-Fall Term
FOLK DANCE-Friday, September 5
8:30 P.M.- 1:00 P.M., Barbour Gym
FIELD HOCKEY-Monday, September 8
4:30 P.M., W.A.B.

MICHIFISH-Wednesday, September 17
7:00 P.M., Margaret Bell Pool
VOLLEYBALL-Monday, October 6
7:00 P.M., Barbour Gym
FENCING-Date to be announced
INTER-HOUSE VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT
watch for due date for team entries
WINTER TERM
BASKETBALL-Thursday, January 8
7:00QP.M., Barbour Gym
INTER-HOUSE BASKETBALL starts week of
February 2

e
s

TENNIS-Monday, September 8
5:00 P.M., Palmer Field Courts
Singles Tournament, September
Finals, September 21

13 & 14

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Mixed

Doubles possible

GYMNASTICS-Tuesday, September 9

III

7:00 P.M.,

Barbour Gym

INTER-HOUSE SWIMMING MEET to be scheduled

1

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0'

SPEED SWIM-Tuesday, September 9
7:30 P.M., Margaret Bell Pool

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RECREATION SWIMMING-Margaret Bell

Pool

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