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September 30, 1969 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-30

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 30, 1969

21 3 S. STATE ST.
OPEN 10-6
DISCOUNT
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LATE SURGE SAVES MSU:
Buckeyes strike for high national ranking

-By BILL ALTERMAN

when the supposedly mortal Bucks clash
los~ the season nols.

with a 37-6 romp over fli-
The Illini could do little to

No. 1 Ohio State opened up its After the game, Frog coach
1969 football season Saturday and Fred Taylor called the Buckeyes
TCU knows it. "the greatest team ever."
TCU knows it as they did a lot He could be wrong - but don't
of spectating that afternoon and bet on it.

l i .

little playing.:
They watched 62 Buckeye points
go up on the scoreboard. It con-
trasted nicely with the goose egga
the Horned Frogs saw fit to add.
It also seemed to go well with
the record 86,412 fans who in-
habited Ohio State Stadium that
afternoon.
Buckeye coach Woody Hayes
however was doubtless more im-
pressed by the things he observ-
ed on the turf. Things like 565
total OSU yardage, three touch-
down runs by John Brockington
and a superlative passing perform-
ance by quarterback Rex Kern.
One can only pause and wonder1
what sort of super natural pheno-
mena will come to Ann Arbor
EXCLU~iVELY
/ I
OR ENGLAND
ti
The8
DESERTBOOT
Resolve right now that before
the week is out you'll be the
proud owner of a pair of
Clark's Desert Boots. Comfor-
table. Casual. Correct, Gen-
uine Mavloyon plantation
crepe soles. In sand, oakwood
brown or luden green suede at
$16.00. Fleece-lined. $20.00.
MAST'S
SHOE STORE
2 STORES.
217 S. Main
619 E. Liberty

MICHIGAN STATE (boo, hiss),
for the second week in a row had
to put on a fourth quarter rally
to pull the "rug" out from under
their opponents as they narrowly
defeated SMU, 23-15. Southern
Methodist quarterback Chuck
Hixson, the nation's leadingpass-
er last year, hit on 17 of 30 passes
for 244 yards, but it was notj
enough to offset two fumbles and
an interception in the final per-
iod which the infidel dogs of MSU
converted into 16 points and the
victory.
It may take more than luck for
Indiana to remain in the top ten
after their Saturday putz-around.
After jumping off to a 14-0 lead
against California they spent the
rest of the day on their collective
cans.
The Bears meanwhile slowly
crept up with time running out,
gained the win on a 61 yard
touchdown pass from Steve Curtis
to Ken Adams.
NOTRE DAME must have left
a good part of their (Eire in
South Bend as 16th ranked Purdue
romped to an easy 28-14 victory
over the 9th ranked Irish.
While Boilermaker quarterback
Mike Phipps was able to complete
12 of 20 passes for 213 yards, his
counterpart, Joe Theismann, was
stymied by a penetrating Purdue
line.
After seeing its defense give up
42 points in their opening game,
the Iowa offense decided to make
like Ohio State and kept scor-
ing until they had run up a 61 to
35 slaughter against Washington
State.
MISSOURI, Michigan s next op-
ponent warmed up for next weeks

stop the running of Joe Moore,
Ron Mcbride and others compris-
ing the potent attack of the no.
11 ranked team.
Ohio and Minnesota f o u g h t
long and hard all afternoon and
when the smoke had cleared, all
those faithful Gridde Pick prog-
nosticators had bit the dust on this
one as it ended a 35-35 tie. The
Bobcat aerial combination of
Cleve Bryant to Todd Snyder came
through with three touchdowns to
match the strong Gopher ground
game.
The University of Wisconsin j
made it 17 in a row as they lost
to 9th ranked UCLA 34-23. UCLA
was not too impressive however,
as they had to make the most of
Badger mistakes to build an 11
point margin against a none too
strong Wisconsin team.
Fifth-ranked Southern Califor-
nia ran to its second easy victory
in a row as they pounded North-
western 48-6. With Clarence Davis
and Jimmy Jones leading the way,
the game was no contest.
With a mere eight weeks to go,
Michigan, Michigan State, and
Purdue are tied on top with ident-
ical 2-0 records. Watch out for
those Columbus, Ohio freaks
I though. With or without tartan
turf (rug?) they'll screw youj
somehow.
Pro Standings

Against
STh e W/
The Can-Ai . .,
... Kind of a drag
By NORM SCHERR
O THE 30,000-odd fans who filled the grandstands and
infield of the Michigan International Speedway Sunday, it
appeared to be an envigorating variation of a somewhat com-
mon theme in the current Can-Am racing series. Dan Gurney,
veteran American racing hero, had fought his way from the rear
of the starting grid to challenge the unfailing dominance of
champions Bruce McClaren and Denis Hulme, finishing the
sixty-five laps right on Hulme's tail. With this fine endeavor,
the fans could console themselves with the thought that maybe
the McClaren-Hulme dynasty could be toppled.
Perhaps Gurney, Hulme and McClaren had a different idea.
As it happened, Gurney could attribute part of his success to
Bruce McClaren, who lent him a space McClaren M8B, the same
type of powerful, consistent machinery Bruce and Denny drive
to their persistent victories. But what price did Gurney have to
pay for this sporting gesture?
UNDER NORMAL circumstances Gurney would have com-
peted in either an Olsonite racer or a McClaren M6B-Ford. Since
both cars were out with mechanical difficulties prioir to the start,
Gurney and his backers sought a replacement, and the bright
orange number one McClaren they turned up with was more
than Just that.
Gurney was within a few seconds of runner-up Hulme
during the final laps, and in the last sweep through the "esses"
and remaining quarter turn, trailed cars four and five by
inches. His time was only sixth-tenth second from the first place
mark, one-tenth second from Hulme's number two slot.
VICTORY WAS certainly within his grasp. It seems a bit
disheartening to think that one of America's greatest drivers,
one who prides himself as president of All-American Racers.
Inc., after dueling his way to the top, should give in to a "gentle-
men's agreement."
To detract further from the situation, McClaren and Hulme
appear to have their own pact as to who will place where. In the
past eight Can-Am events of this season the invincib)le duo have
split their eight victories evenly. With the exclusion of the
Klondike "200", where McClaren failed to finish, and the Mid-
Ohio Can-Am, won by Hulme despite his efforts to let his boss,
McClaren, overtake him, the pair have merely alternated first
and second place.
THE MICHIGAN Can-Am was no exception. Hulme held the
lead for 52 laps, then McClaren nosed up to take the event as
per schedule.
The Canadian-American Challenge Cup series may be in
for a drop in spectator attendance if the current trend of M-
Claren-Hulme domination continues. One can point to the fact
that M.I.S. officials had originally anticipated a turnout of
about 50,000, and were no doubt a little disappointed when only
30,000 racing buffs, optimistically hoping for a change in theme,
made their appearance.
THE POOL of top international talent the Can-Am draws
should be able to sustain a constant struggle for final honors.
Gurney at least showed that given the proper tool, lamely a
well-built car, the indomitable McClaren team is within access
It is sort of ironic that the excellence of the McClaren racers
could eventually lead to a dying out of the series. Like the New
York Yankees of old, the McClaren team stands as sole masters
of the art. But unlike baseball, auto racing loses its dynamic
quality under the weight of a giant. It may become stagnant,
wither and die.

Green Ia
Detroit
:Minnesota
Chicago
Los Angel

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Western Conference
W L 'rPet.
Ly 2 0 0 1.000
I 1 0 .500
a 1 1 0 .500
0 2 0 .000
Coastal Division

Pts.
31
37
75
17

les

0 0 1.000 44

(M)

Atlanta 1 1 0 .500
Baltimore 0 2 0 .000
San Francisco 0 2 0 .000
Eastern Conference
Century 1Division
Cleveland 2 0 0 1.000
New York I 1 0 .500
Pittsburgh I 1 1 .500
St. Louis I 1 0 .500
Capitol Division
Dallas ? 0 01. 000
Washington I1 110 .500
Philadelphia I 1 0 .500
New Orleans 0 2 0 .000
Sunday's Results
Detroit 24, New York 0
Los Angeles 17, Atlanta 7
.Minnesota 52. Baltimore i
St. Louis 20, Chicago 17
D~allas 21I, New Orleans 17
G;reen Bay 14, San Francisco 7
Philadelphia 41. Pittsburgh 27
Cleveland 27, Washington 23

31
34
19
54
24
43
23
45
49
61
37

OP
7
16
38
37
27
29
79
38
43
47
54
41
20
47
54
47

G0-GO

GO-G0

Christmas 1969
Acapolco $399
London $319
Rome $399
Trip includes:
Transportation
Accommodations
Meals
plus all possible x-tras!
Contact:
EMU: EILEEN ELLIS
483-6100
RM. 817 Hill

AMERICAN LEAGUE
E~astern Division
W L T Pet. Pts. OP
Western Division

Houston
New York
Butffailo
Boston
Miami

1
f

1
1
Q

Cincinnati
Oakland
Denver
Kansas City
San Diego

3
.,
y' '-
1

1 0 .667
? 0 .333
? 0 .333
3 0 .000
3 0 .000
tDivision
0 0 1.000
0 0 1.000
1 0 .667
2 0 .333

56
79
63
30
S48

34
74
78
104
69
60
57
67
33
88

85
79
84
77
63

VIETNAM Time's

REALLY UP

Sunday's Results
San Diego 34, New York 27
Buffalo 41, Denver 28
Cincinnati 24, Kansas City 19
Houston 22, Miami 10
Oakland 38, Boston 23

More than 12,000 people turned out at last weekend's march and rally to end the Viet-
nam war; confirming our belief that the Oct. 15 strike and rally will be the largest anti-
war effort the state of Michigan has ever seen. We accept President Robben Fleming's
offer of the Special Events Building for these activities, but we also expect him to make
good his commitment to the anti-war effort, just like the two dozen prominent profess-
ors (N.Y. Times-Sept. 23) who say that support for the strike has mushroomed since
President Nixon's announcement of the two month suspension of the draft, and the
proposed withdrawal of 35,000 troops. This announcement was supposed to quell cam-
pus unrest, but the majority of Americans recognize the senselessness of the Vietnam

President and Mrs. Robben Fleming
( r i al v in ite th
Students and Faculty of the University of Michigan
To >a PRESIDENTIAL ILA at their IH[ome
SEPTEMBER 3)
rfrm 1011o runtilSi O'\0(, IR /-).AL
_ _1,34^ '~_ ^' ^^ ^'

FALL RENTALS
2 bedroom
apartment
2-3-4 Man
McKinley Associates
663-6448

.

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war, and are striking with us to end it.

-Gerold Walker, Press Director

i

NEW MOBILIZATION TO END THE VIETNAM WAR-2522 SAB

I

THESE ARE WITH US-ARE YOU??

I

JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH-Economist and
Former Ambassador to India
NOAM CHOMSKY-Linguist, Mass. Institute of
Technology
HANS MORGENTHAU-Political Scientist,
City Univ. of New York
THOMAS ALTIZER-State Univ. of New York at
Stony Brook
LEE BENSON-Univ. of Pennsylvania
FRANK COLLINS-Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn
LOUIS COSER-Stony Brook

DONALD KALSIH-U.C.L.A.
MARVIN KALSTEIN-Stony Brook
KENNETH KENNISTON-Yale University
WASSILY LOONTEIF--Harvard University
ROBERT LIFTON-Yale University

To All Students, University Employees and Faculty:
The Graduate Assembly Supports and Endors-
es the Student-Communify Anti-War Effort
CooriaeyteNew Mobili1*zation Comn-
m ittee
As a sign of its support,
Graduate Assembly passed the following resolutions:
1) That the Graduate Assembly actively encourage students, faculty and university
staff to strike against the war on October 15th by participating in the anti-war

S. E. LURIA-M.I.T.

PHILLIP MORRISON-M.I.T.
JAY OREAR-Cornell University

MARTIN PERETZ-Harvard University

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