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September 28, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IHA presents
£~ante
t~apie
Saturday, Oct. 4 - 8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $2.00 -$2.50-$3.00
on sofe at
SAB Sept. 29 - Oct. 3
Mail Orders and Block Ticket Requests (Sept. 22-
Oct. 1) I HA Concert, 1511 Student Activities Bldg.
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
A FESTIVAL OF GERMAN EXPRESSIONIST FILMS
Sept. 29-FREE-SIEGFRIED'S DEATH
KIEMHELD'S REVENGE
dir. Fritz Lang (1924
Sept. 30-FREE-7:00-THE STREET
dir. Karl Grune (1923)
9:05-NOSFERATU (DRACULA
dir. F. W. Murnau (1922)
Oct. 1-DOUBLE FEATURE of Fritz Long
7:00-DESTINY
9:05-DR. MABUSE, THE GAMBLER
Oct. 2-VARIETY
dir. E. A. Dupont (1925)
starring Emil Jannings
Oct. 3-GOLEM
dir. Paul Wegenerr 1920)
-parable of a man with power to createlife
Oct. 4-THE CABINET OF DR'CALIGARI
dir. Robert Wiener (1920-The Original
Oct. 5-THE CAT AND THE CANARY
dir. Paul Leni ( l 927
"THEY NEVER END!"
6628871 ARCHITECTURE
75c (or free) AUDITORIUM

the
news today
by The Associated Pres and College Press Service
BOLIVIA'S NEW MILITARY REGIME broke its silence
yesterday about the fate of deposed civilian President Luis
Adolfo Siles Salinas, saying he was granted safe passage to
Chile.
Information Minister Alberto Bailey announced Siles flew to
the Chilean town of Arica from La Paz aboard a Bolivian air force
plane yesterday afternoon. Siles was accompanied by the bishop of
La Paz and the former minister of public health, Jorge Rojas Tardio.
The only remaining major question in the new regime of Gen-
eral Alfredo Ovando is what will happen to the Bolivian subsidiary
of Gulf Oil Corporation.
One of the government's first moves was to overturn the Boliv-
ian petroleum code of 1955 under which Gulf Oil had come to
Bolivia on a multimillion-dollar program of oil and gas exploration.
There have been repeated demands by leftist groups for nation-
alization of Bolivian Gulf, but Ovando said that whether the firm
would actually be nationalized "will be studied later on."
THE HOUSE ARMED SERVICES COMMITTEE, in a sudden
shift of position, will open hearing Tuesday on President Nixon's
proposal for basic reform of the draft law, it was announced
yesterday.
Chairman L. Mendel Rivers. (D-SC) had previously talked
of beginning hearings later this autumn.
Rivers' action is a victory for Nixon and Secretary of Defense
Melvin Laird who have been pressing for draft reform since May,
when Nixon first sent his proposal for a lottery system to Con-
gress.
In urging draft reform the administration has cited reduced
manpower needs and desire to remove inequities, but it also hopes
that changes will help quiet college antiwar protests.
NIXON ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS expect a speedup
in withdrawal of U.S. troops from South Vietnam next year
but without any fined time schedule or target date for a pullout
of all American forces, it was learned yesterday.
South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu said at a news
conference yesterday he is not looking for replacement of all the
Americans by the end of next year, and U.S. officials said they expect
President Nixon will strive to meet Thieu's requirements for arms
and equipment to support South Vietnamese forces.
At his news conference Friday, Nixon rejected proposals to
impose a deadline with the argument that they would make it hard-
er to achieve an early, negotiated settlement. But his -advisors
have hinted he is facing a conflict between diplomatic and domestic{
political aspects of his troop withdrawal plan.
MEXICAN LABOR AND PROFESSIONAL GROUPS an-
nounced yesterday they will march next week to, protest the
U.S. crackdown on drug smuggling from Mexico.
"Becaus: of Operation Intercept our border cities are turning
into ghost towns," said Jose Escalante, a director of the Revolutionary
Labor Federation. "If this situation continues thousands of good
people will be badly hurt."
Escalante said demonstrations will be held next week in three
border tows--Tijuana. Tecate, and Mexicali. The days for th
marches have not been set yet.

Antiwar effort to escalate

WASHINGTON (A') -- Some antiwar
leaders said yesterday the lull in protest
activity is about over, promising massive
action unless President Nixon guarantees
speedy withdrawal of all U.S. troops from
Vietnam.
"People have been waiting to see what
Nixon was going to do," said David Hawk,
co-director of the Vietnam Moratorium
Committee.
"Now, we're going to start it up again."
At a news conference, leaders of the
committee announced plans for a nation-
wide chain of demonstrations as the first
step in a "broad-based political organizing
campaign."
Hawk said the project, which started as
primarily a campus activity, now is aimed
at reaching the larger community in cities
across the country.
Activities Oct. 15 will include, Hawk said,
classroom boycotts, a number of mass ral-

lies, candlelight p~arades, memorial services
in churches, and ceremonies for reading
the rolls of those killed in Vietnam.
The protesters plan also to canvass local
communities with leaflets and door-to-door
recruiting.
"There will be a continuing effort after
Oct. 15," said Sam Brown, another co-
director of the committee and former cam-
p~aign aide of Sen. Eugene McCarthy.
"We view this as a long-term effort,"
Brown said. "We intend to build a move-
ment that would make it imperative that
the United States withdraw from Viet-
nam."
Nixon took note of the coming demon-
stration in his Friday news conference
but said "under no circumstances will I be
affected whatever by it."
Hawk said Nixon's announcement that.
35,000 additional men will be withdrawn
from Vietnam and suspension of the No-
MIfritigan

vember'and December draft. calls are in-
adequate.
"Unless the Nixon administration makes
a genuine commitment to the withdrawal
of all American forces-unless he departs
from the policies that led the country down
the road to disaster, this fall will witness
the largest, most broad-based and sus-
tained movement forthe immediate with-
drawal of all United States forces from
Vietnam that this country has ever seen,"
Hawk said.
Brown said Nixon's statement Friday that
he would not be influ$fced by opposition
on campuses "is the kind of rigid stand
which contributed so much to the bitter-
ness of debate during the last days of
the Johnson administration."
The committee also ran an advertise-
ment in the Sunday edition of the New
York Times carrying endorsements from a
number of well known persons of the plan-
ned Oct. 15 activities.
Da3iti

%#k~oufI roiit Page

Sunday, September 28, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Czechs

oust

anti - Soviets

JUMBOY'

I

F

M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger of % lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, movonnaise ,onions
oickles and ketchup.

Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

Cernik heads
new cabinet
PRAGUE i? -- Czechoslo-
vakia's r ul i n g Communist
party swallowed its 1968 state-
ments condemning the SO-
viet invasion a n d reshuffled
the federal government yes-
terday in the first stage of a
deep purge of party and state
officials left over f r o m the
Alexander Dubcek reform era.
T h e party Central Committee
ended shortly before dawn a two-
day session of probing into the
past. Several hours later Premier
Oldrich Cernik's federal cabinet
resigned in response to party or-
ders. Cernik himself survived the
purge and was asked by President
Ludvik Svoboda to form a new
cabinet, his third since April 1968.
Cernik's new cabinet was an-
nounced last night. The Czecho-
slovak Communist. party has re-
turned power to several old-line
Communists prominent before
1968 and moved to tighten central
control over the new Czech and
Slovak state governments.
Czech State Premier Stanislav
Razl, a moderate, will be replaced
in the next few days by Party Sec-
retary Josef Kempny, a rising
conservative star, the sources add-
ed.
Under a plan disclosed Satur-
day night, Kempny and Slovak
Premier Peter Colotka also will
become deputy federal premiers.
Kempny was also one of a doz-
en new conservatives reportedly
added to the Central Committee
to replace some 15 ousted liberals.
Another newcomer was said to be
Pavel Auersperg, one-time secre-
tary to Stalinist President Anton-
in Novotny.
Novotny's minister of culture,
Karel Hoffman. .was reported
chosen as the new minister of post
and communications, replacing
Milan Smolka.
Hoffman has been accused of
cutting Czechoslovak radio off the
air in August 1968 just as it was
announcing the Soviet invasion.

ISTEwRS

I

West of Arborland

~-Associatted Press
10ippinii a Iwccze
An American visitor finds shopping easy in the border town of Tijuana. Crowds of U.S. customers
have virtually disappeared at all towns on the Mexican border since Operation Intercept began.
Catholc Protestant factions
clash in streets of Belfast
BELFAST, Northern Ireland 0iP Angry Catholics, who took down Hier use of CS gas in Belfast an
-Gunfire crackled in the streets their street barricades earlier this Londonderry stirred loud civilia
of Belfast before dawn Sunday,. month after guarantees of pro- protests.
firebombers set two Roman Cath- tection by the British army, be- Truckloads of British troop
olic homes ablaze and a Catholic gan building a new barrier in the moved in to reinforce soldiersi
mob attacked a police station. trouble zone. They shouted for the Catholic district and the soun
I e itroops to gard the nehborhood

Can this marriage last?

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

d
an
cps
in
nd

Mon., Sept. 29

Noon Luncheon

25c

Discussion of Prof. Platt's "What We Must Do"
(Series: "The Future")
TUES., SEPT. 30 NOON LUNCHEON
PROF. RAYMOND TANTER, Dept. of Political Science:
"Influence of Foreign Aid in Latin America"

25c

F our persons were wounded.
British troops put up barbed
wire barricades which hampered
firemen trying to reach the flam-
ing houses.
Police reported three youths
were wounded in a clash between
Catholics and Protestants, and
another 15-year-old boy was hit
in the leg by a bullet fired by
"unknown persons."

The first street clash occurred
just after midnight when Protes-
tant and Catholic crowds faced
each other on Sackville Street.
Troops inthe mgidle were hit by
flying stones and bottles.
To drive back the threatening
crowds, t!e soldiers fired one can-
nister of CS gas-a potent mix-
ture of smoke and tear gas. Ear-

of gunfire clattered in the;
streets.
Army reports said the trouble
flared when firebombers secretly
crossed the Belfast "peace line"'
manned by British troops, and set
the houses ablaze with bottles of
gasoline. Catholics and Protes-
tants gathered at opposite ends of
Sackville Street and stones began
to fly.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Meeting of Student Religious Liberals
Barbecue Supper at 7 P.M.

TONIGHT AT 8:00 P.M.

PREMIERE TUESDAY!

"EXCITING
~r r

._,,, "ALL FIRST RATE"

20th Century-Fox presents
RICHARD BURTON REXHARRISON
in the Stanley Donen Production
"STAIRCASE"
a sad gay story
P, . "TAIEY DONEN- i. byCHARLES DYER 8 d uoy , p
y N t~DUY MORL -PANAVISION"COLOR[by eLu x R
DOUBLE FEATURE

EA C ELLLENT1II
-Detroit Free Press

Toledo Blade

SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 12
IA7WlcTh cyaicM6'

"FUN AND GAME'
TAUGHT !"

IS

MOTHER

NEVER

-Guarino, Daily News

/

Sept. 16-Sept. 28, 1969
Irresistibly fascinating . .."
Ann Arbor News
SH AKESPEA RE'S

RICHARD
EASTON

Directed by
John Houseman

-
,

plus PLAY" by
-amelBecet

4-

6uy ataa d
C~ eodtr

I

;.

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