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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 23, 196

Page Ewo THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, September 23, 1 969

OzawaOle and Watts: A virildynamic duo

- - ---------

C alifornia Grape Boycott

Picketing
Kroger's

continues at
and K-Mart

By I. A. PERRY
Thle Choral Ujnon Series 01
t he University Musical Society
began its 91st season this past
Sunday with a concert by the
New York Philiarmniicthe
concert was, at least from a
demographic standpoint, a large
sucess. A standing-roomi-only
audience (will they be there
Oct. 6th for Mischa Dichter?)
filled Hill Aud less to hear the
New York Philharmonic than to
see guest conductor Seiji Ozmax
and piano soloist Andre Watts.
The program, hardly adventut e-
>omne, featured the Raclnanin-
off Third Piano Concerto and
the Bartok Concerto for Or-
chest ra.
Seiji Ozawa, thirty-1 tour years
old and highly esteenied, is a
delight to atch on the podium
From tie back, his belov-the-
shoulders black hair, which all
but hideii his triaiisitoriced f ac,
gives the inpressioni of a u i-
ature Liszt, but his baton stle
is almost muebrile. His body
and hands flow and arch with
lie music, his gestures are sub-
tlc and smooth, Likewise, his
ap~proachi to nri st esse ai
elegant. relatix lv unaggressive
1raciousi ess.
Ozawvas approach. wxhich I
tinuk comes closest to that of
t he lte Charles Munch is not
wxhat y~on would expect romn a
child prodigy who guest con-
dected the Boston Symphony at
age twenty- five, apprenticed to
Iherbert Von Karajan at age
t wenty-six, assist ant conducted
lie New York Philharmonic at
age twventy-seven directed the
Chlicago Symphony's Raviiia
Festival at ae twenty-eight.
anidomor le lasttfour years
c'onducted the Toronto Sv-
phiony, In 1970 Ozawa will take
lie helmdnof1the lVsai Fraincisco
Symnphoniy anld, iii Salzburg will
com nduct his first opera, Cosi fatm
tutte, in a theatre. From such a
list of accomihshments, and
from thle abundant press that
O(iva garners lihe akes a
beautifiul magaine cover one
imight ass~ume t hat Oiaxxa's con-
ducting style would stress the
criergetic, thle x irtuosic, the
febrile, muichi iii the manner
y ounig, hiihl-aclaimedl pian-
ists performi these days.
It is all the more srprmsin .
then, to witness the restraint,
the tonal baance, th e gentle
tempos, and the coloristic sub-
lety emanating from ai Ozawa-
led peror'mance. These are gen-
eraliations, to be sure, but. such
qualities were found in Ozawa's
direcction Sunday of the Bartok
Concerto for Orchestra, as they
are mrot ev ident. il his excl-
lent rtiecording of the Belioz
Symphonic Fantastique. Ini the
Berlioz, for example, a reine-
ment of feeling and an almost
classical concen for line blessed
that, perforniancec and made it
stand in contrast to the hyper-
bolic Bernstein approach. (In
his latest recording of the Ber-
lioz, Bernstein strove to stress
the "psychiledelic" aspects of
tle music.t
In Sunday's Bartok, I felt that
()zawa's graceful approach wxas
slightly debilitating. Bartok, like
good chieese, can be served sharp
or mild, but most ot his music
becomes more delectable, if on
wxill, the more its contours and
innei' units are delineated. Un-
der Oawa's often lilting baton,
the tight structtres and incisive
instrumental effects were round-
ed off, blunted, anld conpacted
WOW!

A three-piece Treasore Chest
chicken dinner, lus french fries,
for only 79! c-Largr take-home
order salso, Try a box soon!!
MIL5G t ®P 9ER5VCE
West of Arborland
Tuesday, Sept. 23
The Gospel

wxitin la miore ('oltailli(Iaii
'>)fteied orcl it a:l Otin d. '1 he
l fow Id niovenmveit , ttle ?d "f le
cetaor Boston yni:n
recordings Iiost ceryrva
lie desired piquancy of cI e
In one sense. ot cours~e, Oz/awa's
elegant treatinmiet was beaut t tl

to Ilear 110111 1 lie staiidpouin it of
sonic rcns.but l'elean cua t
no01 quit-,eJBaitok's mnnt'ti I gigll
1944, lmniid >1,aEurope splintered
by xx ar.
Precedinig the Bartok ('on-
certo for Orchestra, dieaui-
ence's attenitionitwasy ivlito
Anidre Wxattis, a t wenty-tw o year
old black miensch who made, it.
and who deserves his accolades
oi purely Inusical grounds.

Watts, who enrolled in the Phi-
ladelphiia Academiy of Music at
the age of nine, had the good
fortune in 1963 to be selected
by Leonard Bernstein for a na-
tionally televised Young People's
Concert. Since that time, Watts
has matured musically and has
maintained the aegis of Bern-
stein, an honor with some in-
herent artistic drawbacks.
The Watts-Ozawa combina-
tion effected the kind of young,
virile, sensitive peirformance
that somehow seemed to come
out of a Forties movie scenario:
there the pained pianist, whose
facial grimaces prove his ecstatic
suffering: there the (by god)'
long-haired conductor, dancing
quietly on the podium; there
lie bored orchestra members,
still digesting lunch; and off in
lie wings, who knows what
long-patient heroine awaits the
tumultuous applause.
Such a slightly melodramatic
aura, undeniably part of the
concert's ambient, was in its
ownvi way perfect for Rachman-
inoff's music. Rkachinanioff's
Third Concerto is like a paint-
igby Chagall-full of nostal-
gic, lyrical, r'omantic, bitter-
sweet, gesture floating fantasy-
like in a sea of colorful padding.
The line between meaningful
gesture and pure style becomes
ambiguous indeed.
Andre Watts met just about
every teechnical impediment in
the music without giving the
feeling that his fingers were
pr'ogramnmed to do the job. He
achieved a decent degree of
identification with the music.
which is riot an easy feat to
punll-off convincingly with Rach-
mnanioff's rodomontade. Watts
seemed to run out of steam in
the third nmovemnent or at least
to save his energies for the final
absurd explosion, that romantic
finale which nevei' signifies any-
thing but the anticipated ova-
tion. Satie once wrote, "I'd
lather they scream then clap.''i
In any case, ini the third move-
VUFFY
SAI NTE
MARIE
October 4!

iment. Watt's played in a less
effulsive and more elliptical
fashion,
There is no question that An-
di'e Watts has the makings of
a great pianist; part of his chal-
lenge will no doubt be to expand
his repertoire out of the Rach-
maninoff-Brahms-Lit'concerti
category with which he is now
identified. Given the demands
from orchestras a c ro0ss the
country for a black virtuoso to
sock-it-to-them, Watts may in-
deed have to struggle to niasteir
the Schubert sonatas.
-- _- ----- --

JOIN US ON THE PICKET LINES
WORK IN THE BOYCOTT
MASS MEETING
Wednesday, September 24--7:30 P.M.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM, UGLI
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PHONE 665-4776

. e ji OZ(11111

0 l
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0

CAP V IO
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IOME

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MONDAY - THURSDAY
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CanA Ticket Price Mistake Be Real'.
Yes, our faulty, human calculators have given you a huge cut in season ticket prices.
The Trueblood Theatre Box Office opens on Monday, September 29th at 12:30 p.m. to
demands for season tickets at $8 and $11 (normally at $14 and $17.50). This uninten-
tional price reduction is, sadly for us .
OUR ERROR, YOUR PROFIT!
UIVRIYPLAYERS
pr-eseii
PLAYBILL 1969-70
THE BALCONY
GENET
OCTOBER 8-11--Trueblood Theatre

TITUS ANDRONICUS
SHAKESPEARE
NOVEMBER 5-8--Trueblood Theatre

AMERICA HURRAH
VAN ITALLIE
DECEMBER 3-6-Trueblood Theatre

ESPERANZA
SHAW
FEBRUARY 1 8-21I-Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre

LIFE IS A DREAM
CALDERON
MARCH 1 IJ-14--Trueblood Theatre

DA K F HERICHARDSON AND BERNEY
JANUARY 28.33I--Trueblood Theatre

-C-hri stm as 1
Rep, EILEEN EL[
Mill IDorei



*NOW*

Cycles sell
in Classifieds

f'rl ar .rn t r 66'2 !64 SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
W__QkO\A GWEDESDAY- IS LADIES DAY
LADIE-S PAY ONtLY 75c UNTIL 6 P.M.
ElIEH*aM POITIER
in>THEaLOS"T MullL
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE ®

PLOUGH AND THE STARS
O'CASEY
APRIL 8-1T 1-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKET INFORMATION
The Box Office will open for Season Subscription sales$ from Sept. 29 to Oct. 11. Thereafter it will be open
weeks of performance only, Monday and Tuesday, 12: 30-5:00; Wednesday thru Saturday, 12:30-8:00. Mail or-
ders will be filled prior to the opening of the Box Offi ce.
PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS A ND PREFERRED LOCATIONS)
Season Subscription: REGULAR (Wed, a nd Thurs.)-$8.00
WEEKEND (Fri. a nd Sat.)-$1 1.00
MIXED (weekday s and weekends mixed)-add 50c for each Friday or
Saturday ticket ordered to regular season prince above
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: WED. and THURS.-$2.00, $ 1.50
FRI. and SAT.-$2.50, $2.00
NOTE: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 rows of balcony.
ALC PERFORMANCES AT 8:00 P.M. SHARP! LATECOME RS WILL BE SEATED AT THE CONVENIENCE OF THE
AUDIENCE. NO REFUNDS. EXCHANGES, WHEN POSSI BCTE, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. DAY OF PERFORMANCE.

I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BANDS
present
VARS)ITYNbIGHTUHOW,1969
featuring
F L I WI L SO^N a n d S AA HV AG H
SATURDAY. September 27 8:00P.M.

TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE: 764.5387

MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE: 668-6300

r

-1I - ~ - --------i---- 1t l-------- -01- l ---- ---- - in-- - 1.- -" N ---- --- --------r-----0
I SEASON SUBSCRIPTION
IODRBAK NAME - -.Weekend -Z
ADDRESS Reula
IMixed Q1
IMles CITY - .. STATE~. - INDIVIDUAL TICKETS
Prefer Orchestra I
PitPHONE -. ZIP Balcony II
IAre you on our mailing list?. Faculty L Student E Ann Arbor E VisitorI
Wed. Thurs. Fri.___ Sat. No. Price Office Use
jBALCONY- --
I TITUS
IAMERICA --_- - _
_ I
!LIFE 1
SPLOUGH --I
I TOTAL (Season Price or Individual Tickets) (for mixed season
I add 50c for each Friday or Saturday ticket ordered to regular season price.)
CHEC ON: Ienclose stamped, self-addressed envelope. Please mail m tickets in September !
CHCjOE I enclose no envelope. Hold my tickets at the Box Office. I will pick themI
j ~up. (See hours above). -?1
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IMAIL ORDERS TO: UNIVERSITY PLAYERSI

Arrnrrlinn tn

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