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September 21, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YOUR CHANCE TO HELP KIDS WHO NEED YOU:
BE A TUTOR IN WILLOW RUN !
Work on Remedial Skills or Use Your Own Special
Talents to Start an Extracurricular Project
ALL MAJORS WELCOME
Call 763-3548 and Make an Appointment to See
Sharon Rosen or Come to 2547 SAB

second .opiuI i'4*Uu jhRe

a4I,

0frigtin

Dat'ly

NEWS PHONE: 764-05332
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0534

Sunday, September 21, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Fraternities

relax

rules

to

increase

M r-)
AMAHd
-OVOLA44WOW,

DIAL 8-6416
TODAY AT
3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
FUR
ALL
}YOUNG
LOVERS
WHEREVER
YOU
ARErJ

By CAROL HILDEBRAND
For some, next week's campus,
issue will be fraternity rush and
fraternities in general.
In a shortened one-week rush
period several hundred men will
look at the 43 fraternities on
campus, either seeking a bid or
just curiously noting merits and
demerits of the system.
To attract rushees, Inter-Fra-
ternity Council (IFC) this year
abolished a 50-year rule requir-
ing coats and ties at rush.
The move is in a way symbolic
of the fraternities' larger at-'
tempt to destroy the "look alike,

act alike, think alike" image they
have developed on campus.
"Individuals may dress as they
please." said Tom Mowry, exter-
nal vice president of IFC. "It's
artificial for us to be dressed
up now."
. Mowry estimates that Some 20
fraternities are really "anti-fra-
ternities". These appreciate vary-
ing viewpoints within the house,
they are concerned with campus
issues, and they are generally
aware of a student's right to his
individuality. About 10 houses,
Mowry guesses, are still of the
"rah-rah fraternity" vintage.
For the past year IFC has been

striving to extend its concerns to
campus and national issues, as
well as city problems.
The Fraternity Representatives
Association (FRA) was begun last
year. Mowry, its chairman, says
its purpose is to "find campus
issues, study them, tell fraternity
members about them, and elicit
support for them."
Fraternities have currently en-
dorsed the University bookstore
and the intra-mural building
fund. Last year they endorsed the
boycott of a local high-priced
store, the rent strike, and t h e
abolition of the language require-
ments.

Despite their "c h a n g e our as I know, there are only two like;
image" offensive, fraternities still that, and those aren't much of
have outspoken critics, however. fraternities anymore, but just
"I don't think they do much places to live," he said.
thinking about what's coming off Fraternities are generally veryI
in the U.S. or on the campus. internalized operations, requiring
They care about grad schools and little outside help and authority..
dates," observed Steve Touhey, Tom Schrader, treasurer of!
'69. Delta Tau Delta, explained t h a t
Touhey was president of his at his house one member is theI
Phi Zappa Psi pledge class the fraternity's paid manager. Ano-
winter of 1967, but eventually de- ther member, responsible f o r'
pledged. ordering food, gets free meals.
"The reason I got out was be- Paid actives or unpaid pledges are
cause they weren't like that," responsible for cleaning. The
commented Neil Dickman, anoth- cook, in fact, is the only non-
er former fraternity member who fraternity member involved in
depledged two years ago. "As far the house.

rush
Schrader estimates the average
cost of fraternity living is $145 a
month - incluidng d u e s and
social fees.
Dickman disagrees with him on
costs also. "I haven't been there
for two years, and I'm sure that
everything has gone up since
then. But when I was there t h e
straight cost was $150 a month,
and everything is tacked on from
there," he says.
"I also know that there are
others which are even higher," he
continued. "It's a pretty expen-
sive way to live," he said.

= -° ;

The motion picture to be
seen again and again- A
ANd AWOMAN

ACADEMIY+f
AWARDS!
WINNER.(

the
news today
1b) ThIe A '.o cdj) eN(l il/ d( .u0lt', cPres Sirii c

Senate questions
stock transaction,

STEVE McQUEEN
IN
THE G REAT ESCAPE
"Sheer escapism"
-Fromm
"Lies! All Lies"
-Goebbels
SAT.-SUN. at 7 and 9:15
SEPT. 20-21 Aud. A 75c
DOUBLE FEATURE- ENDS TUESDAY

SEN. MIKE MANSFIELD charged yesterday that the U.S.
involvement in Laos had cost millions of dollars and hundreds of
lives.
Commenting in a report on a trip to Southeast Asia which included
stops in Laos, Mansfield, Senate majority leader, said he doubts that
U.S. troops are involved in combat in Laos, but warned that the cur-
rent course there could lead to a Vietnam-style military government
there.
Mansfield said that U.S. military forces in Laos are numbered in
the hundreds at a cost which exceeds $300 million a year. Sen. Stuart'
Symington (D-Mo.) , has already announced that his Foreign Rela-;
tions subcommittee on overseas commitments will begin closed hear-
ings on Laos on Oct. 14.
TROOP CONTRIBt'TING NATIONS besides the U.S. say
they may soon follow the U.S. lead in withdrawing forces from
South Vietnam. ,
However, at the meeting of foreign ministers from Thailand, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand, South Korea and the Philippines in the U.N..
representatives of each country said they had no plans to withdraw
any troops before the current withdrawal of 60,000 U.S. soldiers is
completed in December.
At the same time. Thanat Kjoman, Thai foreign minister, an-
nounced that both the timetable and the numbers have been agreed
upon for a withdrawal of troops from Thailand. Thanat refused to
disclose specifically what these were, however.
SEN. ROMAN L. IIRUSKA yesterday withdrew his n a m e
from the race for the post of Senate minority leader.
In withdrawing his name, Hruska threw his support to Sen. How-
ard Baker Jr. of Tennessee, who is left in the race with Sen. Hugh
Scott of Pennsylvania.
Hruska, now serving his third term, had been regarded as the
most conservative candidate in the race. Sen. Baker, only a freshman
senator, labels himself as a middle-of-the -roader, while Sen. Scott is
regarded as the most liberal of the three men.

by

Haynsworth

WASHINGTON (-Supreme Court nominee Clement F.
Haynsworth purchased $16,000 of Brunswick Corp. stock in
1967, six weeks after joining in a pro-Brunswick decision but
before the opinion was announced, the Justice Department
said yesterday.
It said after checking with Judge Haynsworth and with
his stock broker, Arthur McCall of Greenville, S.C., that the
broker suggested the purchase and that "none of the facts
indicate that information obtained in hearing the case
entered into the purchase." -
The department, in a letter fromUu
Asst,. Atty. Gen. William Rehn- ,UCLA may
quist to Chairman James 0. East-
land (D-Miss), of the Senate Judi- 1

c
c

-Associated Preys
1J'inciii 9'protIest
About 50 Biafrans, one carrying a casket filled with bones, danced
and sang in front of the White House yesterday calling for the
U.S. to secure freedom for their country.
ST UIDNI T PRESDENT:
Lower court convicts,
tWo (Iraft protesters

t

ULYSSESA SUPERB FILMI
ife Magazine
"BRILLIANT,
FORCEFUL AND
RESPECTABLE x
CINEMA ART".
wthef, - :r

ciary Committee, said also it is
doubtful the case involving liens
on fixtur'es for 10 bowling alleys,
"could conceivably have affected
the market value of Brunswick's
stock."
In testimony last week to the
committee, Haynsworth, currently
chief judge of the 4th U.S. Cir'-
cuit Court of Appeals, said in list-
ing his large stock portfolio "I
have disqualified myself in all;
cases in which I had a stock in-
terest."
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-Ind), who
raised the question of the judge's
Brunswick stock, called the matter
"an amazing coincidence" andt
said "My chief concern is with
the way this matter looks to the
public."'
"It sure looks bad to the pub-
lic," he added, although he went
on to s a y he certainly doesn't!
think Haynsworth "is on the
take" or would be influenced by
$16,000 worth of stock.
The AFL-CIO, which is oppos-
ing confirmation, issued a state-
ment saying the case "shows
again the indifference to ethical
niceties which has marked h i s
tenure on the bench."
The labor organization accused
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell and
Eastland of acting in collusion "to1

t ire I)IaeI
instructor
By JIM HECK
College Press Service
San Francisco - The Univer-
sity of California Regents m a y
have turned UCLA into another
San Francisco State late last
night.
Voting in the longest secret ex-
ecutive session since the firing of
Clark Kerr, the Regents decided
to fire UCLA black philosophy
professor, Angela Davis. She is an
avowed American communist..
UCLA campus is expected to
erupt in violence within the week
if Chancellor Charles E. Young
goes ahead with the decision, as
expected.
The firing is the fourth imple-
mentation of a 1940 Regental by-
law forbidding communists to
teach on California campuses.
The last time it was used was in
1950 after a McCarthy hearing
held in the state.
Sources in Sacramento an-
nounced this morning the decis-

i'

EUGENE, Oregon 'CPS' The
student body president of the Uni-
versity of Oregon and a fellow

student have been sentenced to
two years in prison for 30 minutes
GEN. LEWIS HERSHEY yesterday told a group of students of nonviolent protest against the
he has no intention of resigning his Selective Service post. dit Mo.gan the president and
Speaking to a group of about 450 students assembled for a con- David Gwyther, a veteran activist,
vention of the conservatively oriented Association of Student Govern- face incarceration in a Lompoc,
ments, Hershey denied earlier reports that he would resign if certain Calif. federal prison as a result
changes were made in current draft procedures. aof their conviction in U.S. District
At the same meeting, Hershey commented that his only reaction Court last June on three counts'
to the cancellation of the November and December draft calls was of "disrupting Selective Service
that he would "have another breather for a couple of months." Con- Proceedings."
cerning the future, Hershey said he would fear a volunteer army and Both are currently free on bail
tdraft would be instituted instead to appeal the conviction and sen-
hoped a lottery datwudb nsiue nta.tence.
The students were also addressed yesterday by President Nixon
who claimed that "his administration was deeply concerned about Morgan acted as judge, Gwyther
the frustrations on U.S. campuses which boil over into violence." as prosecuting attorney, and 12
tother students as jurors in mock
trials conducted at Eugene and
Roseburg, Ore. local draft boards'

with using force to disrupt thex
meetings.
There were no injuries in the in-1
cidents and only two witnessest
testified there had been physical
contact between the students and1
the board members, but the prose-,
cutor, a U.S. attor'ney, contended
and the jury apparently agreed1
that the students' entry into theI
meeting was in itself an act of
force.
Morgan and Gwyther claimed
throughout the trial that they had!
engaged in no forceful disruption,
but rather had made peaceful ver-
bal presentations to dramatize1

"LIKE A VOLT JOLT FROM THE THIRD RAIL!
It hits even harder on the screen than it did on the stage!"
Time Magazine
LEROI JONES'
"DUTCH MAN"

CZECHOSLOVAKIAN POLITICAL LEADERS have appar-
ently decided the political fate of Alexander Dubeek and many of
his liberal supporters.
The announcement made by the Presidium, to which Dubcek still
belongs, indicated that after weeks of wrangling among Party Chief
Gustav Husak, Dubcek, and his opponents, a decision has been reach-
ed on fixing blame for events that led to the Soviet invasion.
Speculation was that Dubcek will lose at least his Presidium seat,
and Josef Smrkovski and a host of other Dubcek supporters probably
will be purged from the Central Committee.
most popular play in emu
summer theatre history

last winter.
In each of the two mock trials,
the students entered official board
meetings en masse, staged a kan-
geroo court in which board mem-
bers were pronounced guilty of
"crimes against humanity," and
left after a short time.
The mock jurors were never in-
dicted, but Morgan and Gwyther
were brought to trial and charged'

hal lds the fujil PJ1L0 01
their opposition to military con- whitewash Judge Haynsworth in- ov.sRegan aunpdrhanceor
scription. stead of conducting a fair and I
Gwyther's attorney, citing a re- open-minded inquiry.
cent case in which the same judge Joseph L. Rauh, counsel for the An eleventh h o u r attempt by
sentenced a man found guilty on Leadership Conference on Civil I UCLA director of Afro-American
13 counts of federal tax evasion Rights, called on Haynsworth to Studies, Robert Singleton, failed
to 30 days in jail, questioned the withdraw as a nominee. last night. Only he and Chancel-
judicial priorities involved since, Rehnquists's letter said that the Ior Young were admitted in exec-
he said, the tax evader is mo- c a s e was assigned to a three- utive sessions. He had warned the
tivated by selfish ends, the draft judge panel including Haynsworth Regents "of grave consequences'
law violator by high ideals. in October 1967 and "It is at this if they went ahead with the decis-
But the judge, directing his point that the judges normally ion.
comments at Morgan and Gwyth- consider whether they a r e dis- Singleton has not indicated
er, said, "I don't know about your qualified in a case." After pur- what his newly organized depart-
idealism. There is a question in chasing the stock in December ment will do, but the Black Stu-
my mind whether you were sincere 1967 Haynsworth twice reviewed dents Union (BSUi has announc-
or whether you were trying to the decision before it was issued ed it will "begin some form of po-
avoid the draft." in Richmond. Va. tence activity."

EATa_._. _.NERAL___ _._Av.__.._

"A STRIKING EXPERIENCE
AND ONE WITH AN
IMPACT THAT IS ALL BUT
UNFORGETTABLE! Creates
a shattering impact. A
vision of undiluted harsh-
ness and lanauane of
untempered fury!"
Hollis Alpert.
Saturday Review
SUNDAY -
"Ulysses" -
"Dutchman"

'TOLD WITH BRUTAL
ELOQUENCE! Shirley Knight
i close to perfect-
tartling! Al Freeman Jr.
is excellent ' ---Brendan Gill,
The New York er
"THERE HAS NEVER BEEN
ANYTHING LIKE THIS ON
T1NE AMERICAN SCREEN!"
William Wolf. Cue Magazine
3:00, 6:00, 9:00
- 5:00, 8:00

on a
HOT
tin
roof

eastern michigan
university theatre
Saturday
September 20
7:00 and 10:00 P.M
Sunday
September 21
8:00 P.M.

MONDAY and TUESDAY-
"Ulysses" - 6:00, 9:00
"Dutchman" - 8:00 only
FIFT0 'I'T1EAT'E

761-9700

ALL SEATS RESERVED-$1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
Box Office Open Daily: 12:45-8:30 P.M.
AIR-CONDITIONED DANIEL QUIRK AUDITORIUM
BONUS PRODUCTION
WINNER!3 ACADEMY AWARDS
INCLUDING BEST ACTRESS KATHARINE HEPBURN
NOW SHOWING 3RD
A-r nrc'i 1A or) DDICT .C'rr

September 20, 21
L'AVENTURA
Dir. MICHELANGLO ANTONLONI (1960)
The director of "Blow Up" and the soon to be re-
leased "Zabriskie Point" presents this killer.
7 & 9 75 ARCHITECTUREI
662-8871 7 C AUDITORIUM
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, &9 P.M.
Proqram Information 662-6264
ACTION & SUSPENSE

LASER CONCEIT
THE VERY LATEST IN ELECTRONIC ENTERTAINMENT
"R"direct from its New York Pre-
miere Showinq. See the Sonovi-
ion Krypton Laser transform
music inmo 4 colonr, ful -di t

FOX EASTERN THEATRES ka
FOX VILLa5E
375 No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300
JEOM1 LLA
4 . PROD

MON.-FRI.--7:20 & 9:30
SAT._&SUN.--1-3
-----5:10-7 :20-9 :30

lHA presents
BUFFY
SAINTE
MARIE
Saturday, Oct. 4 - 8:30 P.M.

I KRL.ULAK FK rI...,,L " V'A VVEI

I

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