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September 20, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-20

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most popular play in emu
summer theatre history
eastern michiqon
university theatre
Saturday
September 20
on a 71:00and 10:00 P.M.
HOT
tin Sunday
roof September 21
____________________8:00P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED-$1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
Box Office Open Daily: 12:45-8:30 P.M
AIR-CONDITIONED DANIEL QUIRK AUDITORIUM
BONUS PRODUCTION

Saturday, September 20, 1969

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

President

cuts

back

drei
this

- -- -, -
ea,;

presses
Strike
resolved

for

reforms

at MSZ)
EAST LANSING (.)

11

fo rmandr ' 969
WASHINGTON 1, - President Nixon yeiirday' ordered a
cutback in draft calls to an average of less than 10,000 men
for each of the next three months.
The cutback, which would re .ulI in the Iuxet draft cal
in 41,2 years, will be accomplished by stUetching out a 29,000-
man draft for October through the remainder of the year.
Draft calls in November and December will be suspended.
The President also announced he will use an executive
order to institute basic reforms in the Selective Service Sys-
tem if Congress fails to approve his proposd draft legislation
by the end of this year.
The reforms would include the establishmet of a prime-
selection group system which would ons of 19 year-olds

Strik-

ing maintenance workers yes-
terday approved a contract
with Michigan State Univer-
sity, allowing classes to begin
next week, as previously
scheduled.
The 1,400 member affiliate of
the American Federation of State,
County, and Municipal Employees
voted unanimously to approve a
26-cents-an-hour wage increase
offered by the university.
Dr. Walter Adams, acting pre-
sident of MSU had ordered the
fall term postponed when t h e
union refused to accept a similar
offer.
In response to yesterday's agree-
ment, Adams announced .the
university would revert to its ori-
ginal schedule: registration early
next week followed by resumption
of classes Thursday morning.
Union acceptance of the con-
tract offer came swiftly yesterday
since members had voiced sup-
port Thursday for most of the
proposals offered by MSU Secre-
tary Jack Breslin.
Adams announced earlier that
MSU would not seek an injunc-
tion against the strike or try to
force binding arbitration. He made
it clear, however, he would not
open the university without a ra-
tified contract in order to pro-
tect the "health, safety and
morals" of the 30.000 students at
MSU.
Univeritfy spoke mtn said the
freshmen dormitories would be
open Sunday night, and new stu-
dents in upper classes were asked;
to report on Monday.
The contract between MSU and
the union will expire next year.
However, the agreement stipulates
that next year's negotiations
would be subject to binding arbi-
tration if no agreement is reached
by June 15.

--Daily--Jerry Wechsler
Dreamtig 0 nnoes
On the eve of another Michigan quest for a trip to Pasadena, a pep rally was held at the Physics-
Astronomy building last night. The cheerleaders hailed the victors valiant, and the crowd warmed
to the inspiring words of Doc hazel Losh. But words will become secondary to deeds as 'M' opens
the season today against Vanderbilt.
'NO MONEY A VAILABLE':
1 1 Me 1rules out ad(iftiollal

DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TODAY
"A MYSTERIOUSLY POWERFUL FILM!"
N.Y. Daily New,
"SHOULD BE SEEN AT
- LEAST TWICE..!"
N.Y. Times
r Tfl, S 1iA
S PIER PAOLO PASOLIN
ERNCE STAM SILVANA MANGANO
SI- ( .m s
FACES 3:10,7:001
TEOREMA 5:20, 9:151
"ONE OF THE YEAR S

and college students whose
deferments have expired.
Both actions were seen by ob-
servers as an attempt by the ad-
ministration to limit the effect of
the nationwide anti-war protests
expected this fall.
At a news conference following
Nixon's statement, Defense Sec-
retary Melvin R. Laird said the
draft reductions have been made
possible by the administration's
plans to withdraw s o m e 60,000
troops from Vietnam this y e a r
and to cut 150,000 men from the
armed forces.
Laird added that plans to draft
35,000 men in January will be re-
viewed in December.
As the first step in their at-
tempt to speed up draft reform,
the White House wiil send simp)i-
fied legislation to Congress seek;-
ing the repeal of alegalproviusiton
which requirestak l tal te ole
eligible men to be drafte ,
This provision prevents the useto
the random-selection Procedure
favored by the administratio)n.
If Congress doesn't a o e
legislation, the Presiden il in-
stitute a "moving age g_,roup iyte
which would make theoswldet en
in any given mont dur reur
19th year most yeabe to
draft.
However, Laird said he hoped:1 an.
executive order would not be e -
essary.
"I join the President in urng
in the strongest possible tem
congressional action on our reques
for approval of randomsecio
before congressional busine.",< ssi
concluded this year," he said.(
The 29,000 man total draf it call
for the remainder of the year<;,will1
be spread out by drafting 10,000
men during October and Novem-
ber. and 9,000 men inDembr

clothing fuiid

st

tijis year

'ov 8 4) a ai
S ICON '-rsen Nuen
Van Tniudelrdy'era tt
chc l n a oe lee of enm
-ateid atvt dpors
Predn Naixo repeatedlyorec
sai yeta wthawalh woudeals
Crmedmoet Uie fhtn g,00i
Tensexp.aTne a the aigree-s
meat0. srahddrn io

1' n1Wire serviceRepri ts
Governor Milliken has announc-
ed that the state will not appro-
priate additional funds as an
emergency clothing allowance for
mothers receiving Aid to Depend-
ent Children (ADC.
Welfare mothers in Ann Arbor
and the Citizen's Committee for'
School Clothing are currently ask-
ing the county to increase the
allocation of $27.50 per child pro-
vided for school clothing by the
state and county.
Last fall, the ADC mothers were
granted a $70 clothing allowance
following several demonstrations.

10 BEST I--New York Times
THE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE
John Cassavetes"'FAC ES"
"A MILESTONE!
A FINE ACHIEVEMENT"
Judith Crist

. S
..{A

I

761 -9700

I

riii a rr+ane rarrriwr an i ran nrarnrrrr rr

DOUBLE FEATURE-STARTS TOMORROW
"LIKE A VOLT JOLT FROM THE
THIRD RAIL'!"
Time
LE ROI JONES'
"D~UTCHAN
AND
"A SUPERB Showtimes Sunday
A, ULYSSES
3:00, 6:00, 9.00
"BRILLIANT DUTCHMAN
CINEMA ART.' 5:00, 8:00
-A ~ 1 /0FNSTRd PROODjC~iT4
C 4
LASER I CONCEIUI'
THE VERY LATEST IN ELECTRONIC ENTERTAINMENT
direct from its New York Pre-
inere Showing. See the Sonovi-
sion Krvoton Laser transform

the
bI he Assoia/ed Pre and C( eg Press~ Srie
TH E SOVIET GOVERNMENT yesterday reiterated its demand
that the U.S. end all internal interference in Vietnam.
In a lengthy policy speech to the United Nations General As-
sembly, Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko declared that total with-
drawal from Vietnam by the U.S. is a strict pre-requisite to peace.
Gromyko's speech- was seen as the Soviet Union's response to'
President Nixon's address to the General Assembly Thursday, which
called on the U.N. members to aid in bringing an end to the war.
In his speech yesterday Gromyko proposed the U.N. discuss pro-
hibiting of the development and stockpiling of chemical and bacteri-
ological weapons. However, he rejected Nixon's proposal to limit arms
shipments to the Middle East.
In a related speech, U.N. Secretary General U Thant urged the
U.S. and the Soviet Union to immediately begin the proposed talks
on the limitation of strategic weapons. Nixon had suggested in his
address that, a date be set for the start of such talks.
THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT announced yesterday it will
withdraw its nuclear strike force from NATO.
According to Defense Minister Leo Cadieux, the discontinuance
of the strike force will be accompanied by a 50 per cent reduction
in Canadian manpower in Europe.
Canada is the second country in NATO to substantially reduce
its commitment to the Western Hemisphere defense alliance. France
withdrew all its troops from NATO last year.

The County Board of Supervisors
has said the appropriation was
possible then because surplus
funds were available.
This year, however, the Super-
visors have claimed there is no
money available for an additional
clothing allowance.
The Supervisors stance was ap-
parently supported by Milliken's
statement.
The governor cited specific
wording in the budget for the De-
partment of Social Services which
provided no more than $3 million
in state money for an additional
clothing allowance.
The governor said that the Le-
gislature intended to rule out even
the possibility of payments in
addition to what was provided in
the budget.
"There is no choice in this mat-
ter." Milliken said. "There is no
money."
In a related development, the
Washtenaw County Social Services
Board has issued a statement
blasting the Supervisors for de-
manding an inquiry into the use
of state money by the Social Serv-
ices Board.
The statement, issued Thursday,
referred in particular to supervisor
David Byrd, an outspoken critic
of the board's welfare policies.
The supervisors approved a re-
solution Tuesday offered by Byrd
which asked state officials to
check reports that welfare money
from the state which could be
The Mfi higan Daily, edited aind man-
,~g(I by tulvit at rtle University ol
Mic e 764-052. Second
C... ptagepaid at Ann Arhor, Mici-
gua,430 Maynared S, Ann Arbor.
icgan 48104. PAJbl iheid daily Tile s-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
81 vear Sumnb-riptton rates: $10 by
ri r, y m a i
uha d morning Subsrip-
tion rtes: $:3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
ma il,

Coopsdii y

used locally was being refused by
the Social Services Board.
According to information ob-
tained by Byrd, as much as $100,-
000 a year may have been turned
back.
However, the Social Services
Board denied the charges saying
they were "appalled by apparent
lack of knowledge of county gov-
ernmental affairs and the irre-
sponsible attitude" exhibited by
Byrd."
'The irresponsibility inherent in
the resolution," the statement
added, is demonstrated by the fact
that the stated basis for a por-
tion of the resolution was a rum-
or, which is not only unfounded,
but which could not possibly be
factually correct.,

By ALEXA CANADY
A representative collection of the creations
of the 3,000 people belonging to the handicraft
cooperatives of the Federation of Southern Co-
operatives (FSC) areon display and being sold at
the Kiwanis Activities Center through tonight.
The display includes handmade quilts, dolls,
handicrafts and fruitcakes made by member or-
ganizations of FSC.
FSC is a non-profit organization with member
cooperatives in 17 southern states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia. It provides its more than 83
member cooperatives with business training,
marketing assistance, technical and financial
advisors, and organizational assistance.
The scope of FSC embraces four types of co-
operatives: agriculture, handicraft, credit union,
and consumer. John Perkins; supervisor of the
task force of community organizers in Missis-
sippi, says. "the 83 cooperatives represent 22,000
families who would ordinarily be on welfare."
Edward Truitt, Jr. from Homeland Distrib-
uting and Development Co. the company holding
the gift show, expanded Perkins point "the major
benefit is that FSC and Homeland are responding
to a need, a need for these cooperatives to oper-
ate and to get their goods marketed."
The type of people in the cooperatives vary
widely from the Mexican-American women that

form the Floristas dcl Rio Grande, to the black
women of the Freedom Quilinug Bee. or the ina
and women of the Blue Ridge Heathside Ccalts
Associates in Appalahia
"FSC is mainy financed b nts from. th
Ford, Field and New York lotndaions says Per-
kins. The FSC booklt also p0in1s out that it
receives assistance from the Offic' 01 LEonemic
Opportunity and the Small Business Administra-
Lion. Dues and fees friom the member. of SC
also provide a portion of its budget
Perkins, however, doesnt believe the coopera-
tive can become economically suece sstul in pres-
ent society. He maintains thai "'te cude eth-
ods of the cooperatives annot. compete with the
sophisticated machinery of Amariten indutry."
Per-kins feels that Instead of an econonmic
movement, "ths cooperative are another Phase
of the civil rights movement.
"We can only use them as a metho t f
change, they can only he sueees tl if they peak
to the political syse," he says.
"Blacks don't have an economi' ba.e. In
order to go into politics, they need mo-v thr
cooperative can provide that economic hase'" he
concludes.
Perkins gave the .oioie o V
cooperatives have en i eecn
black officials: Gen C ad Ho-
mes County, Alabama.

SOUTHERN FEDER I

Na! Nononono! IN-nt! " "Yes, you silly goose!"
d"Yes, I L 1 ?"J1s sir

- - - - - MONVOINI ORMNYA 1

MUSKAC

1 J
i -

.
b " j

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