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September 18, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-18

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All the Other
Big Ten Schools
Have a Bookstore.
WHY NOT MICHIGAN?

Strikers, landlords brace for long s

By STEVE KOPPMAN
As the Ann Arbor rent strike
enters its eighth month, both
strikers and landlords are pre-
paring for what promises to be
a prolonged struggle.
The strike which began last
February and passed through a
summer slowdown should pick
up full f o r c e again soon as
strikers begin withholding their
October rent payments-as the
Tenants Union has urged.
Now, the ardous task of or-
ganizing - talking to tenants,
explaining the goals of the Ten-
ants' Union, and convincing
them to join the strike - must
begin again. After three nights
of organizers' workshops last

week, the union now has over
100 organizers, its planned min-
imum quota.
Tenants Union leaders say
the next few months w ill be
crucial in determining the fu-
ture course of the strike. They
expect landlords to pressure
strikers to quit the strike by of-
fering rent reductions and oth-
er improvements, which strike
leaders maintain, would only be
temporary, in the absence of a
strong Tenants Union.
What strikers are demanding,
basically, is recognition of the
Tenants Union as bargaining
agent for all future leases sign-
ed in this town. With this pow-
er, union leaders hope the or-

ganization could eventually in-
fluence other tenant-consumer
affairs - such as pressure the
city and University to build low-
cost housing.
If substantial numbers of
strikers continue withholding
rents despite landlord pressure,
strike leaders feel the landlords
will suffer severe financial loss-
es and consequently, recognize
the union and enter into nego-
tiations.
"We don't know exactly what
number of people we need to
break the landlords," says Ten-
ants Union spokesman Stuart
Katz, "but they're not going to
do anything until they have to.
If they're hurting, they'll rec-

ognize the union. If not, they
won't.
"Everyone should see the
strike as a long battle." adds
Katz.
So far, strike leaders expect
the strike will attract substan-
tially more support than last
year's core of 1200 strikers -
now that it has gained nation-
wide recognition in magazines
and newspapers, sparked strike
efforts in college towns through-
out the country, a n d demon-
strated in the local courts that
strikers will not be evicted.
"Things are running m u c h
more smoothly than they did
last year," s a y s Katz. "We're

probably going to get more
strikers than before.
"But we're realists, a n d we
just can't predict." he says. "A
month from now we'll be able to
make a significant assessment
of the way things are going."
The landlords show no signs
of relaxing their opposition to
the Union's goal of recognition.
Some landlords have told steer-
ing committee members in in-
formal conversations that they
might agree to recognize the
union if it first returns all rent
payments owed them.
Strike leaders dismiss this as
a ruse, and say that none of the
escrow fund should be released
until a satisfactory agreement

/ ruggle
with the landlords is reached.
Summit Associates has held
informal discussions with steer-
ing committee members on such
matters as damage deposits, but
the committee argues that no
agreements can be reached un-
til the company recognizes the
union.
Jay Gampbell, a Summit
manager, explains that h i s
company wants to rzach agree-
ments on some matters before it
recognizes the union and enters
formal negotiations. In addi-
tion, says Gampbell, some of
the union's goals - like rent
reductions -- are "not feasible."
Other landlords have been less
See TENANTS, Page 8

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Thursday, September 18, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

PROMISES REFORMS

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Laird

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A PROPOSAL for direct popular election of the president
survived a crucial House of Representatives test yesterday.
Supporters of the proposed constitutional amendment defeated a
substitute plan that would have awarded Electoral College votes on the
basis of popular vote in congressional districts. The direct election
proposal would abolish the Electoral College.
The vote was 192-159, indicating a close vote when the amend-
ment comes up for 'final approval today. A two-thirds majority is
required for approval and only 145 negative votes would defeat the
proposal.
THE SENATE voted yesterday to bar use of American coni-
bat troops in Laos and Thailand except where protection of U.S.
personnel is involved.
The 86-0 vote came on an amendment offered by Sen. John
Sherman Cooper IR-Ky.) to a $20 billion military authorization bill.'
The Senate also approved an amendment requiring a reduction
in the numerical strength of the armed forces to match the number,
of troops withdrawn from Vietnam.
K
JUDGE CLEMENT F. IIAYNSWORTH urged the Senate
to reject his nomination to the Supreme Court if it concludest
he acted improperly in a controversial case.
Haynsworth referred to suggestions that he should not have
ruled in a 1963 decision involving a textile combine which had con-
tracts with a vending machine company partly owned by Haynsworth.
Haynsworth said he received clearance to participate in the
case from his fellow judges on the U.S. Circuit Court and from the
late Robert F. Kennedy, then attorney general.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy claimed his brother had rejected only
charges of bribery and had not ruled on the ethical question involved.
SOUTHERN GOVERNORS yesterday approved a resolution
favoring nondiscriminatory education but urging restraint in
busing children.
The unprecendented action came at the annual Southern Gov-
ernors in Williamsburg, Va. The vote was 9-3, the bare three-fourths
majority required by conference rules for passage.
The compromise resolution was approved by the governors after
a statement condemning busing was narrowly defeated. Tuesday night
Vice President Agnew told the conference the Nixon administration
opposed busing just to achieve integration.l
RALPH T. SMITH was named by Illinois Gov. Richard B.
Ogilvie yesterday to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Sen. t
Everett M. Dirksen.
The speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives, Smith will
serve at least until January, 1970, the remainder of Dirksen's term.
Smith, a conservative Republican, will probably get his party's
nomination to run for a full term in the 1970 election.
THE WHITE HOUSE made public a task force report urg-
ing a space program featuring shuttle rockets, a space station.
and a manned Mars landing.
Vice President Spiro Agnew recommended adoption of a plan tot
send Americans to Mars about 1986.1

Laird announces draft plans

WASHINGTON (R - Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird
hinted yesterday that draft calls late this year will be sharply
cut as a result of troop withdrawals from South Vietnam.
"The Vietnamization program will have a very significant
effect on programmed draft calls for the months immediately
ahead," the defense chief told a news conference.
Without saying so specifically, he thus implied that Ithe
previously set October draft of 29,000 men may be scaled
down and later quotas kept low.
Laird said he expected to advise the Selective Service
system of "changes in draft calls""

WORKERS STRIKE:
MSU delays classes

tomorrow.
He also signaledl the start of a
Nixon administration campaign
to prod Congress into acting on
proposed reforms in the draft such
as instituting a lottery system
and switching the order of induc-
tions from older age groups to the
19-year category. He said he will
testify on the "urgent need" for
draft changes this week.
Spokesmen said Laird was re-
ferring to an appearance he will
make before the House Appropri-
ations Committee.
Laird's comments on the draft
came as he detailed the adminis-
tration's second troop cutback of
35,000 men - technically 40,500
military spaces - in Vietnam.
All four services will share in
the withdrawal, with the Marines
cutting 18.457 spaces with t h e
pullback of the remainder of its
3rd Division. The Army loses 14.-'
263, the Navy 5.239, and the Air
Force 2.541.
Only one Marine division will be
left in the provinces immediately
below the demilitarized zone and
Laird said the gap will be filled
by South Vietnam's 1st Division.
The latest reduction also will
mean another 20,000-man drop in
over-all U.S. military strength,
dropping the American force'
worldwide to about 3.39 million by
next July. Combined reductions in'
armed strength this year now to-
tal 150.000.
As for the over-all war situa-
tion. Laird said the United States
"has not made substantial pro-
gress" in the Paris peace talks but1
has progressed in the Vietnamiza-
tion program, the effort to make
South Vietnam more capable of
defending itself.
Laird disclosed that the Joint
Chiefs of Staff wanted to proceed,
more cautiously than other top
administration officials, but also!
sought to discourage the idea that
any major arguing was involved
in last week's White House de-
liberations involving the chiefs asI
well as Gen. Creighton W. Ab-
rams of the command in Vietnam.'
"I can assure you it was not a|E
contentious affair in any way,"
Laird said.

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EAST LANSING 01 1- Michi-
gan State University, has post-
poned fall registration for its 40,-
000 students in the face of an on-
going strike that has closed dormi-
tories and dining halls.
Some 1,400 maintenance work-
ers, who have stayed off jobs in
residence halls and research cent-
ers for more than six days, yestkr-
day rejected a contract that called
for a one-year salary increase
averaging 23 cents an hour.
Negotiations between the uni-
versity and the union began late
in May and union members con-
tinned to work without a con-
tract.

The motion picture to be
seen again and again- AIM AN
Ad WOMAN

ACADEMY
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State labor mediators were call-
ed into the dispute several times,
but no efforts to seek an injunc-
tion or binding arbitration w e r e
planned immediately, the univer-
sity said.
Dr. Walter Adams, acting uni-
versity president, said next Mon-
day's scheduled registration was
postponed because "we do not con-
sider it responsible administration
to open the university without a
ratified contract."
Adams said he took the step, af-
ter conferring with top univer-
sity officials, in order to protect
the "health, safety and morale"
of students.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
ag'd by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
('lass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
da' through Sunday morning Univer-
sit' year. Subscription rates. SIO by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tiesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3-00 by carrier, $300 by
mail,

Deny motion
to inspect
murder site
By ROBERT KRAFTOWITZ
County Circuit Court Judge
John W. Conlin yesterday declined
to issue an order allowing attom'-
neys for accused murderer John
Collins to inspect the alleged
scene of the crime.
Collins is charged with the pre-
meditated murder of Eastern
Michigan University coed Karen
Beineman. Miss Beineman was the
sixth coed murdered in the Ann
Arbor-Ypsilanti area since March.
At a pre-trial hearing yesterday
afternoon, Richard Ryan, cour't-
appointed defense attorney, claim-
ed he had not been allowed to in-
spect the home of State Police
Sgt. David Leik, Collins' uncle.
The prosecution has attempted
to prove the murder was commit-
ted in Leik's basement.
Conlin said he was legally bar-
red from ordering the inspection
of a private home without the
consent of the owner.
However, Ryan later indicated
he still might secure permission
from Leik to make an inspection.
At yesterday's hearing. Conlin
postponed until Oct. 1 considera-
tion of a motion by the defense
for suppression of certain evi-
dence introduced by the prosecu-
tion, including fingerprint com-
parisons of the defendant which
link him to the victim.
Ryan contended the evidence
was obtained illegally through the
use of faulty search warrants.
In response to a third motion
by the defense-that they be fur-
nished certain evidence obtained
by the prosecution-the judge or-
dered the two sides to attempt to
agree privately on release of the
evidence, which includes:
-Statements the prosecution
has obtained from any witnesses;
-Scientific reports on samples
of blood and hair taken from the
scene of the alleged murder.
The prosecution is not required
by law to provide the defense with
evidence it has obtained, and ob-
servers felt it was unlikely they
would.
However, Conlin said he would
make "a final ruling on any items
the two sides cannot agree on."

Ramsey Clark
former Atty. General

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BACH CLUB
presents
RONALD BYRNSIDE
speaking on
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Refreshments & FUN afterwards!
Thursday, Sept. 18, 8 P.M.
1236 Washtenaw (at S. Forest,
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(Last meetinq's attendance was
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For further info, coll 665-6806,
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Doors open at 8, Music of 9
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802 Monroe
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
NON I LUNCHF N 25c

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S1vBurkhard Strumpel, associate
PROF ERNEST P. YOUNG, University professor of economies
PR -F. ERNEstoP.:and a senior study director for the
Dept. of History: Survey Research Center of the
"Issues and Questions Concerning Institute for Social Research, is a
the Vietnam Action Teach-In" featured speaker at a conference
Sept. 17-19 in Madrid, Spain.
-- - --- - The conference is being present-
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sociation of business cycle research
I I institutes.
WOW!
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IN

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