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September 11, 1969 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

roge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

Thursday, September 1], 1969

~'g~ T~n THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, September 11, 1 969

Belt Midrash of Ann Arbor,
PRE-REGISTRATION FORM
Na me
Campus Address
Phone Number
Check those courses which are of interest to you, fill- out the
above farm, andJ mail to Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St., Ann
Arbor
FOR MORE DETAILS CALL 663-4129
1. HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS-Mrs. Ilana Mueller. j
2. HEBREW FOR GRADUATES OF BEGINNER'S HE-,
BREW--Mr. Alan Krashny.
.3. READINGS AND CONVERSATION IN PROGRAM-
MATIC THOUGHT IN HEBREW-Mr. Krashny and
staff.
4. BASIC JUDAISM-JEWISH ETHICS-Rabbi Gerald!
Goldman,
5. READINGS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT-Rabbi Mer-
vin Tomsky.
6. AN ADVANCED SEMINAR IN JEWISH HISTORY
AND SOCIAL EVOLUTION: PALESTINE 1926-
1956-Mr. Joseph Katan and staff.
7. A SURVEY OF JEWISH COMMUNITIES IN EUROPE
AND AMERICA: A MODERN HISTORICAL AND
SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIASPORA-w
Mr. Michael Harrison and staff.
8. PERSONAL WORTH AND COLLECTIVE IDENTITY
-Mr Jos ph D Ben-Dak.
9. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN LITERARY YIDDISHj
-Dr. Charles Krahmalkov.I
10. INTERMEDIATE MODERN LITERARY YIDDISH
Lecturer and time to be announced.
11. INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH MUSICOLOGY
Lecturer and time to be announced.
..12. INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH ART--Lecturer andI
timne to be announced.
13. RESEARCH AND READING: individual prepara-
tion of Research papers with individual guidance
and availability of Beit-Midrash staff.
14. HEBREW SPEAKING CLUB-For those who can
converse in Hebrew there will be a Hebrew con-
versational group.
Thbe in t ato re UM faculty and doctoral students who brir
I to the Be!;"itMid'rash both academic expertise and personal Jewish
orientati nrotable for their depth and variety. The Beit Midrash
i operated in cooperation with the Detroit Midrash, and some
cources are applicable there toward the Hebrew teachers certifi-
c Inst ue t mm btam UM credit
OFFICIAL REGISTRATION and ORIENTATION
SEPT. _-10-11, 7:30-9:30

DISRUPTION:

300 plan

SGC to (liscUss ipIlicationis of

U' girds forprotest;fall peace disruptig Reeints on bookstore
ROTC officers calm -oagayndauds to a ase there Regenbers contend
a Irt' n u m c (i .e itoacii e in erby 1yii 111 i k(H t , to tmembem cntend

(C mtuani m l : L I
conferred constantly over the dis-
ruption question. ROTC officers
maintained a complete calm and
made no special preparations for
the protests.
"We'll wait and see it it hap-
pens." said Navy ROTC stall
member Lon Nickols. "We don't
even know if there's going to be
a disruption." He said no specific
plans were made in anticipation
of trouble today.
"We intend to conduct classes
as normal," added Col. Antonio
Criscuolo of the Air Force. He
said disrupters would be prose-
cuted "through normal channels--
just like in any other school." He
declined to specify what action
would be taken.
Although no specific prepara-
tions were announced, Sanford
Security guards at North Hall,
where ROTC offices and classes
are located. v e r e reportedly
checking for student identifica-
tion cards of all people who en-
tered the building yesterday.
However. University Security
Officer Rolland Gainsley said he
did not order the guards to check
the identification and did not
know why it was being done. He
noted that the guards had been
stationed there since a bomb
rocked the building this sumner.
Rod Roberts. ,'70 chairman of
Dily Classifieds
B ritt, Results

the University Services Commit-
tee of the University Activities
Center, told the ROTC meeting
UAC would sponsor an open forum
on the ROTC issue if this was
desired.
Roberts compared the forum to
a similar meeting which took place
after the student power protests
in 1966.
"After the forum three years
ago, the movement completely
dissolved.' he said. "The Univer-
sity officials seem to be hoping
this could happen again.''
Whistle Stop
truck burned
vandals set fire to a vehicle
owned by two Whistle Stop Res-
taurant employes about 9:00 p.m.
last night destroying the interior.
Rick Oliver who identified him-
self and Bruce Gilbert as the
owners said that they left the '59
El Camino Chevy pick-up truck
parked behind the Forest St. park-
ing structure briefly while making
a phone call and returned to find
it in flames.
'There was garbage and oil cans
piled in the back of the truck" re-
ported Oliver who said -vitnesses
to the incident had been question-
ed by Ann Arbor police. Police re-
fused to confirm the investigation.

Continued from Page 1
plans call for a march from Mich-
igan Stadium to the Diag follow-
ing the football game on Sept.
20.
In addition, Mobe leaders ex-
pect, several prominent spokes-
men of the anti-war movement to
deliver speeches at the teach-in.
University President Robben
W. Fleming has also indicated
plans to participate in the teach-
in and will deliver a speech on
the evening of Sept. 19.
According to Mobe leaders, how-
ever, the major purpose of the
meeting will be to conduct several
workshops to finalize plans for the
fall demonstrations.
The first protest will be a class
strike Oct. 15. to coincide with
similar action at other campuses.
According to Gladstone, the Oc-
tober protest will be followed by
demonstrations one day longer
each month for the duration of
the war.
"We will strike for one day in
October, two days in November,
three days in December, and so
until the soldiers are brought
home." Gladstone said.
The culmination of the nation-
wide anti-war protests will be a
march in Washington on Nov. 15,
similar to previous demonstrations
there.
According to Gladstone, N:w
Mobe is a coalition of some 115
national anti-war organizations.
including the old Mobilization to
End the War in Vietnam.
The peace groups merged at a
planning session in Cleveland dur-
ing the Fourh of July weekend,
Gladstone said.
The coalition's first action was
an anti-war protest outside Pre-
sident Nixon's summer home in
Sani Clemente. Cal. last month.

If the quiet of a University func-
tion is disturbed in the process
SGC could then be intentionally
violating its ovn rules.
If SGC does abolish the rule,
according to Central Student Judi-
cia ry Chairman Marc Wohl. the
case cannot be tried before the
student court.
"It's the function of CSJ to en-
force regulations set by Student,
Government Council," Wohl ex-
plained. "If they rescind the rule
there is no regulation on which an
aggrieved party, like the Regents,
can bring a complaint."
In such a case, it would have
to be heard before the administra-
tive boards of the respective
schools and colleges or before a
civil authority.
Although the University also has
fthe same ban on disruption. CSJ"
does not recognize that regulation
or the authority of the administra-
tive boards to make decisions on
students' non-academic conduct.
SGC President Marty McLaugh-
lin sidesteps the issue of violating
Council's disruption ban by con-
tending that those at the rally
should decide how to proceed. He
says SGC has little business de-
termining the position of the peo-
ple who will be doing the disrupt-
ing.
Van Der Hout says he favors
taking a chance in violating the
rule if it stands in the way of dis-
rupting the meeting. He hopes
disruption will bring about posi-
tive action on the bookstore.
But many SGC members fear
such a violation of the rule might
be construed in some circles as a
tacit abridgement of SGC's legiti-
macy. Administrators, they say,
could argue that Council has dis-
obeyed -its own rules and could
raise serious questions about the
legitimacy of SGC as a responsible
vehicle for student representation.
As a result, if the University de-
cides to discipline students for
possible disruption of the meeting,
the administration might very wellr
hand the case over to the faculty
administrative boards in the
schools and colleges for a judicial1
decision.
SGC member Bob Nelson saysI
"To take out the rule would givel
Fleming an excuse to give it to the1
faculty." And. Nelson argues. theK
faculty would impose a -stiffer<
punishment than would Central
Student Judiciary.t
In addition, several councilI
members believe CSJ would taker
a larger view of the issue and take1
note of the philosophical issues
which prompted a disruption. c
But McLaughlin says he thinks
cases would go to the faculty any- It

a sUUeiL Zsit L.LpLLi..U .D, LIIU iu is not 4I *, LUO Voe satrisiactor.

LSA facuity administrative ooardm
without. sending the case to CSJ.
Other Council members see a
possible compromise.
Roger Keats suggests amending
the rule to allow disruptions, but
only after all legitimate means of
finding a solution have been ex-
hausted.
SGC member Mary Livingston
has drawn up a clarification of the
rule that would modify the clause.
It now reads "Intentional ,disrup-
tion of 'University functions by de-
priving others of needed quiet,
light heat or other physical con-
ditions of work is prohibited.".
Miss Livingston says it should
read "disruption by depriving
students and faculty . ., is pro-
hibited." She purposefully excludes
administrators because she does
not see them as a constituency of
the University. This, quite clearly,
leaves SGC an escape valve to dis-
rupt next week's Regents meeting.
Miss Livingstin also recommends
undertaking an evalution of the
rule.
SGC member Joan Shemel, on
the other hand. favors withdrawal
of the rule. but she-like other
SGC members - admits she may
change her mind.
Most Council members do seem
to be decided on accepting Presi-
dent Fleming's offer, made Tues-
day, to arrange a meeting be-
tween SGC and the Regents over
the bookstore issue. But, by the
same token. the students are
skeptical of the value it will have.t
If any solution to the bookstore
question is agreed upon by the

t oest. tney say. the Regents
would agree on an administration
proposal- -which adtvocates fumld-
ing the bookstore through volun-
tary student contributions and
outside gift,.
"The administtation proposal."
says Nelson bluntly "is no pro-
posal at all." He and others do not
believe that students can raise the
funds without a fee assessment.
SGC members are groping for
a possible compromise, an alter-
native to the administration plan.
"Maybe we can organize some-
thing with registration to raise
the money," says Miss Shemel.
But she is not sure.
And there is some hesitation
about disrupting the meeting
Keats says that talks with stu-
dents this week have convinced
him that there is overwhelming
sentiment for the idea. of a Uni-
versity bookstore, but that few
persons are willing to disrupt the
meeting.
Miss Shemel says she is just
not sure how effective disrupting
the meeting would be. One Coun-
cil member said she favors a tui-
tion withholding as a more potent
weapon.
But disruption is not ruled out.
Few SGC members seem to want
to let the Regents postpone a vote
until their October meeting.
Even Keats-considered one of
the most conservative Council
members - said "We had this
bookstore plan ready for the Re-
gents in March. They better have
a legitimate reason for stalling
and it better not be needing more
time to think about it."

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.City mayre-open probe
of 5 Black Beret arrests
( unC iued fo i 1 I"staged" in order to search RE-
Mayor Harris had asked whether CALL headquarters and obtain a
the police should have known that list of names of people working
an attempt to arrest Hunter in- on the RECALL campaign.
side the building would probably The Berets also maintain that
provoke resistance. the police were more interested in
Krasny's report replied, "Groups harrassing them than in arresting
of this type always resist and feel Hunter, who walked out the front
they have a license to fight the door during the fight.
police. We cannot run from our Beyer said he arrived at the
sworn duty and turn our society office the following morning and
over to Revolutionaries." "the place was a mess."
Members of RECALL maintain He said the incident occurred
that Hunter never attempted to miore than a week after the war-
resist arrest but offered to go rant had been issued and Hunter
along with the officers if they had made no att mpt to flee or
would step back from the office hide.
and let him walk out the front "If the police had really wanted
door, but they refused to do so. to just pick Hunter up, they could
Furthermore. RECALL sources have done it at any time," he
feel the whole incident was added.

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