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September 10, 1969 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-10

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ART PRINT LOAN
Liven up your room--rent a print from Art
Print Loan for a semester or year.
3511,3516 SAB
Tuesday 3-5
Wednesday 3-5, 7-9
Thursday 7-9
Friday 3-5

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1JtrI'ti3Fan

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NET'S PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, September 10, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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PETER OTOOLE KATHARINE HEPBURN
AMARTI N POL I
4 1~THE LION IN WINTER
4 Shows Daily ---1 :10-3:40-6.20-8.50

4TH
BIG
WEEK

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FQH VILLa3E
375 No.MAPLE RD. 7691300

Mon -Fri.:
7:00 & 9:30
Sat-Sun.:
2:30 4:40
7:00 & 9:30

the
news today
bt , Th Asi(tc atI' Pnu andi,, o II Prs,' Srt A
EGYPT'S AMBASSADOR ACCUSED the United States yes-
terday of aggression against his country by supplying supersonic
Phantom fighter-bombers to Israel.
Ambassador Ahmed Hassan el-FEki asserted that Israeli's mas-
sive raid into Egypt was an act of escalation resulting directly from
the delivery of the Phantoms.
First shipments of 50 Phantoms arrived recently in Israel, but
State Department press officer Robert McCloskey said the govern-
ment has "no evidence" that Israel used the Phantoms in yesterday's
raid
PRESIDENT NIXON will convene his top military and diplo-
matic advisers at the White House Friday for a new look at what
strategy to pursue in Vietnam.
The next U.S. troop withdrawal. possibilities for another peace
move in Paris, the impact of Ho Chi Minh's death, and the U.S.
split with Saigon on cease-lire observance are among leading items
"on the Vietnam docket.
The death last week of North Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh
has injected a new element into the strategy picture, though U.S.
analysts are not yet sur'e of what the long range implications may be.
Another issue, which is causing uneasiness in Washington, is
the split with President Nguyen Van Thieu's Saigon government over
observing the enemy-proclaimed cease-fire in honor of Ho's death.
Saigon reports showed that the Thieu regime was in effect rebuffing
the truce while the Americans were trying to go along with it.
Some Washington informants suggested that the U.S. andj
South Vietnamese forces responses to the truce call were different
in part because of different domestic pressures,
WASHINGTON IS NEGOTIATING with Syria to give it a
seat on the U.N. Security Council, in return for release of two
Israeli passengers of a jet hijacked to Damascus. 10 days ago,
a source close to the governinent said yesterday.
The Americans have consulted Israel and found it willing to go
along with the deal the source said.
Washington has admitted responsibility for the welfare and
release of the two men, while Israel has refused to give Syria
anything in exchange for then
RAIL SHIPMENT OF LETHAL GAS was halted Tuesday
by the Federal Railroad Administration leaving the Army with
the problem of disposing of 1,294 cylinders of phosgene gas that
remain from World War I.
A spokesman for the Railroad Administration said its action was
Prompted by complaints from congressmen, state officials and con-
cerned citizens. It is unlikely the gas will ever be shipped by raid,
lie added, unless something is done about the condition of the
cylinders. Presently, the cylinders do not meet federal safety stand-
ards.
The gas was being shipped from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal
near Denver, Colorado to two chemical companies that convert phos-
gene to commercial products. Now, Army officials say they may havet
to default on these two contracts, and one official added, "it will1
probably cost us substantial money"
A SMALL SINGLE-ENGINE PLANE knifed into the side of
an Allegheny Airlines DC9 jetliner with 82 persons aboard, and1
both craft plunged to the ground with no apparent survivors.1
The planes crashed about 10 miles southeast of Indianapolis.
The Allegheny plane was flight 853 in flight from Cincinnati to In-
dianapolis.
The collision occurred as the jetliner was descending from 6.0001
feet to 2,500 feet in partly cloudy skies in a landing approach to

Israel
with

I.

hits

amphibious

Arab

bas
assault
Biggest raid
sin1ce 1967
Mideast wa
TEL AVIV OP- An Israeli am-
phibious force with tanks and sup-
ported by planes slipped across the
Gulf of Suez Tuesday and rolled
over Egyptian army camps, guard
posts and radar stations, military
spokesmen said.
About 100 Egyptians were said
by Israel officers to have been
killed in the biggest action against
Egypt since the 1967 Middle East
var.
Cairo radio claims the invasion
was repulsed with the loss to Is-
rael of three planes, two torpedo
boats and heavy casualties. Israel
reported one plane lost to anti-
aircraft fire and one soldier slight
ly wounded.
The landing took place near El
Hasayer, about 28 miles south of
the port of Suez at the southern
end of the Suez Canal, and the
,task force turned south, running
unchecked 30 miles to Ras Za'far-
ana, also on the coast. the Israeli
army said.
pector At the same time, Israeli planes
fromattacked various Egyptian military
frm targets, including a Soviet-built
surface-to-air missile station at El
Hasayer. The missile facility was
knocked out of action, Israeli of-
ficers said.
In a nationwide radio and tesc-
vision broadcast. Israeli Prime
Minister Golda Meir told her peo-
ple: "The raid was meant to strike
at the bases and concentrations
of the Egyptian army which have
served as a base for commando
space in units laying mines and launching
attacks against Israeli positions."
ing also A communique added: "Through
briefly,:rapid progress, the force attacked
n school guard posts, army camps, radar
s phase stations, military vehicles and
rograms military encampments and inflict-
ore sig- ed on the enemy dozens of casual-
ity-wide ties both killed and inj'ired, and
also heavy damage to buildings,
ing said installations and vehicles," a com-
r'ograms munique said.
rom the "Enemy planes and vessels bid
nments. not interfere or hinder the Israeh
funds forces during the whole operation.
ally". See ISRAEL, Page 7

Radical Film Series
PRESENTS
HISTORIA DE UNA BATALLA
Distributed bv Newsreel
A documentary by Manuel Octavo Gomez about the illiteracy
campaign in Cuba in 1961. It shows the young people going
into the countryside to teach, and their successful return to
the city. The footage is juxtaposed with The Bay of Pigs
disaster of 1961, which serves to heighten the heroic struggle
of the Cubans to build a new society.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th
7-8-9-10-11
Admission 50c
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
Thursday and Friday
ALL
THESE
WOMEN
Ingmar Bergman
1964)
Bergman's first
color film
'A real ha ha."
John Gray
7 & 9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 7C AUDITORIUM

e( lae
}lprotest

A New York City policeman moves in to protect Deputy Inst
Joseph Fink of the city police force, center with glasses,
angry welfare demonstrators on the city's Lower East Side.

1D -'110 LID EUE. S

Cohen
By BARD MONTGOMERY
Education school Dean Wilbur
Cohen yesterday pledged to ini-
tiate social action and education
reforms, increasing student parti-
cipation and faculty leadership.
In his first state of the educa-
tion school address since his ap-
pointment July 1, Cohen said.
"Teachers must take a leadership
role in the reformation of our
institutions and processes."
He added the curriculum re-
forms would include an inter-dis-
ciplinary approach to educational

pledges refori

Police cllief, students (lelate
S. University suimmer riots.

studies, including public health,
law. social work and the broader .
social sciences.
Cohen's projected reforms in-
clude a multidisciplinary treat-
ment of educational studies, in-
cluding public health, law, social
work and the broader social sci-
e21c4's.
P-oriented instructional pro-
grains would be geared to service
and research projects such as
recently initiated teacher train-
ing program in Detroit public
schools, plus classroom and field
experience preparation for under-
graduates which is still in the
p~lanning stage.
Cohen also noted students' re-
presentation without voting priv-
ileges on the school's 'executive
and adiinistiative committees
and a student-run counseling of-
lice. He urged a further exten-
sion of the students' role, "allow-
ing them to take up their respon-
sibilities as teachers earlier and
more effectively."
The dean outlined an evaluation
of the school, including compari-
sons with other schools and re-
commendations from graduate
students, to determine priorities
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Clas postage paidrat Ann Arbor, Mich-
cmai, 420 May'nard St., Ann Arbor.;
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Universityj
year. Subscription rates: $9 by carrier,
10t by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
SnA:i.

for allocating funds andr
the coming year.
President Robben Flem
addressed the meeting
asking that the education
and other academic unit
money out of marginal p
into those judged to be m
nificant, to meet Univers
budget cuts.
Both Cohen and Flemi
that funding for new p
could not be expected fr
state and federal gover
Fleming concluded that
must be "generated interne

By IRA IIOFIFMAN
Antn Arbor Police Chief Walter
Krasny and a representative of
the Washtenaw County Sheriff's
Department faced the students
last night in an informal debate
on the summer's South University
riots before members of the Pilot
Program in Alice Lloyd Hall.
The high point of the talk was
Capt. William Hollis' explanation
of why h2 was accompanied by a
police dog for the debate.
"I was not told ghat type of
meeting I was coming to," he ex-
plained. "I though the group
inight be interested in a demon-
stration of a trained police dog."
"I was going to show you how
the dog works," he added.

Occasional diatribes from the
left, such as when one student
launched into a declaration of how
Woodstock proved "we have the
power to take over this country in
twenty years. usually drew groans
from the 100 students attending.
His comments. as it turned out,
were a lead-in to a question at to
wIhy the sheriff's deputy was wear-
ing a hat.
Hollis said it was part of the
regular equipment, just like a gun.
"Whenever an officer has a gun
he wears his hat,. Hollis ex-I
plained.
Also on the panel were Dave
Denair, who was arrested during'
the South University disturbances,,
and Daily managing editor Ron

Landsman. who was working for
the Associated Press at the time
and covered the riots.
Denair gave a long account of
his unpleasant experiences on the
first night of the riots, noting that,
he turned tip there only as a spec-
tator curious as to why there was
such a large crowd.
He said he was beaten by a p0-
liceman as lie stood on a sidewalk
near one of the disturbed areas. le
also described how one other nian
was showed face-first into a police
bus and kicked then,
Krasney questioned Denair's ac -
curacy, calling his statement "a
fiction story. I question 'he ac-
'curacy of some of his facts.'

Former 'U' economics
department head dies
Isaiah Leo Sharfman, chairman
of the University economics de-
partment for 27 years, died in
Washington yesterday at the age
of 83.
Prof. Sharfman, an authority on
transportation economics, wa3 the
author of the definitive study of
the Interstate Commerce CG)nmrais-
sion and often served on presi-
dential emergency, boards under
the Railway Labor Act.
His five-volume work on the
ICC, completed in 1937 and long
out of print, is being reprinted this
year.
Prof. Sharfman retired from the
U-M faculty in 1955 after 43 yeairs
of service.
He had lived in Washington for
the past two years. IsihStarfmanl

THE
COMPANY

"The Nation's Finest Ensemble!"
-Walter Kerr, N Y. Times
in
3 Brilliant
New Productions
Prior to N.Y.!
C & IL x. tL1

°r t"'t n',- SEPTEMBER 16-28
Xm

RICHARD
EASTON

SHAKESPEARE'S THOMPSON
SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 12
Ghelderoade's
> 4 i :. .. PaPnr;ag'wires 4-

N

OCTOBER14-26
TAMMY NIn- 'lft- t"AI AR r--1-

i

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